Neonatal CD71+ Erythroid Cells Do Not Modify Murine Sepsis Mortality.

Wynn JL, Scumpia PO, Stocks BT, Romano-Keeler J, Alrifai MW, Liu JH, Kim AS, Alford CE, Matta P, Weitkamp JH, Moore DJ
J Immunol. 2015 195 (3): 1064-70

PMID: 26101326 · PMCID: PMC4506905 · DOI:10.4049/jimmunol.1500771

Sepsis is a major cause of neonatal mortality and morbidity worldwide. A recent report suggested that murine neonatal host defense against infection could be compromised by immunosuppressive CD71(+) erythroid splenocytes. We examined the impact of CD71(+) erythroid splenocytes on murine neonatal mortality to endotoxin challenge or polymicrobial sepsis and characterized circulating CD71(+) erythroid (CD235a(+)) cells in human neonates. Adoptive transfer or an Ab-mediated reduction in neonatal CD71(+) erythroid splenocytes did not alter murine neonatal survival to endotoxin challenge or polymicrobial sepsis challenge. Ex vivo immunosuppression of stimulated adult CD11b(+) cells was not limited to neonatal splenocytes; it also occurred with adult and neonatal bone marrow. Animals treated with anti-CD71 Ab showed reduced splenic bacterial load following bacterial challenge compared with isotype-treated mice. However, adoptive transfer of enriched CD71(+) erythroid splenocytes to CD71(+)-reduced animals did not reduce bacterial clearance. Human CD71(+)CD235a(+) cells were common among cord blood mononuclear cells and were shown to be reticulocytes. In summary, a lack of effect on murine survival to polymicrobial sepsis following adoptive transfer or diminution of CD71(+) erythroid splenocytes under these experimental conditions suggests that the impact of these cells on neonatal infection risk and progression may be limited. An unanticipated immune priming effect of anti-CD71 Ab treatment, rather than a reduction in immunosuppressive CD71(+) erythroid splenocytes, was likely responsible for the reported enhanced bacterial clearance. In humans, the well-described rapid decrease in circulating reticulocytes after birth suggests that they may have a limited role in reducing inflammation secondary to microbial colonization.

Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

MeSH Terms (18)

Adoptive Transfer Animals Antibodies Antigens, CD Bone Marrow Cells CD11b Antigen Endotoxins Erythroid Cells Female Fetal Blood Humans Male Mice Mice, Inbred C57BL Receptors, Transferrin Reticulocytes Sepsis Spleen

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