Future directions in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis research. An NHLBI workshop report.

Blackwell TS, Tager AM, Borok Z, Moore BB, Schwartz DA, Anstrom KJ, Bar-Joseph Z, Bitterman P, Blackburn MR, Bradford W, Brown KK, Chapman HA, Collard HR, Cosgrove GP, Deterding R, Doyle R, Flaherty KR, Garcia CK, Hagood JS, Henke CA, Herzog E, Hogaboam CM, Horowitz JC, King TE, Loyd JE, Lawson WE, Marsh CB, Noble PW, Noth I, Sheppard D, Olsson J, Ortiz LA, O'Riordan TG, Oury TD, Raghu G, Roman J, Sime PJ, Sisson TH, Tschumperlin D, Violette SM, Weaver TE, Wells RG, White ES, Kaminski N, Martinez FJ, Wynn TA, Thannickal VJ, Eu JP
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2014 189 (2): 214-22

PMID: 24160862 · PMCID: PMC3983890 · DOI:10.1164/rccm.201306-1141WS

The median survival of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) continues to be approximately 3 years from the time of diagnosis, underscoring the lack of effective medical therapies for this disease. In the United States alone, approximately 40,000 patients die of this disease annually. In November 2012, the NHLBI held a workshop aimed at coordinating research efforts and accelerating the development of IPF therapies. Basic, translational, and clinical researchers gathered with representatives from the NHLBI, patient advocacy groups, pharmaceutical companies, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to review the current state of IPF research and identify priority areas, opportunities for collaborations, and directions for future research. The workshop was organized into groups that were tasked with assessing and making recommendations to promote progress in one of the following six critical areas of research: (1) biology of alveolar epithelial injury and aberrant repair; (2) role of extracellular matrix; (3) preclinical modeling; (4) role of inflammation and immunity; (5) genetic, epigenetic, and environmental determinants; (6) translation of discoveries into diagnostics and therapeutics. The workshop recommendations provide a basis for directing future research and strategic planning by scientific, professional, and patient communities and the NHLBI.

MeSH Terms (11)

Animals Biomedical Research Disease Models, Animal Extracellular Matrix Genetic Predisposition to Disease Humans Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis Inflammation Mice Pulmonary Alveoli Respiratory Mucosa

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