Incidence of catheter-related bloodstream infections in neonates following removal of peripherally inserted central venous catheters.

Casner M, Hoesli SJ, Slaughter JC, Hill M, Weitkamp JH
Pediatr Crit Care Med. 2014 15 (1): 42-8

PMID: 24141656 · DOI:10.1097/PCC.0b013e31829f5feb

OBJECTIVES - Catheter-associated bloodstream infections are a significant source of morbidity and healthcare cost in the neonatal ICU. Previous studies examining the prevalence of bloodstream infections after removal of peripherally inserted central venous catheters in neonates are equivocal.

DESIGN - A retrospective cohort study.

PATIENTS - All infants with peripherally inserted central venous catheters treated at the Vanderbilt neonatal ICU between 2007 and 2009.

MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS - We evaluated the following outcomes: 1) bloodstream infections, 2) culture-negative sepsis, 3) number of sepsis evaluations, and 4) number of significant apnea/bradycardia events comparing odds ratios between 72 hours before and 72 hours after peripherally inserted central venous catheter removal. We analyzed a total of 1,002 peripherally inserted central venous catheters in 856 individual infants with a median (interquartile range) gestational age of 31 weeks (28-37 wk) and a median birth weight of 1,469 g (960-2,690 g). Comparing 72 hours before with 72 hours after peripherally inserted central venous catheter removal did not show a difference in the prevalence of bloodstream infections (9 vs 3, p = 0.08), prevalence of culture-negative sepsis (37 vs 40, p = 0.73), number of sepsis evaluations (p = 0.42), or number of apnea/bradycardia events (p = 0.32). However, in peripherally inserted central venous catheter not used for delivery of antibiotics, there was a 3.83-fold increase in odds for culture-negative sepsis following peripherally inserted central venous catheter removal (95% confidence interval, 1.48-10.5; p = 0.001). For infants less than 1,500 g birth weight (very low birth weight), odds for culture-negative sepsis increased to 6.3-fold following removal of peripherally inserted central venous catheters not used for antibiotic delivery (95% confidence interval, 1.78-26.86; p < 0.01).

CONCLUSIONS - Although these data do not support the routine use of antibiotics for sepsis prophylaxis prior to peripherally inserted central venous catheter removal, they suggests that very low birth weight infants not recently exposed to antibiotics are at increased odds for associated adverse events following discontinuation of their peripherally inserted central venous catheter.

MeSH Terms (20)

Anti-Bacterial Agents Apnea Birth Weight Bradycardia Catheter-Related Infections Catheterization, Peripheral Catheters, Indwelling Central Venous Catheters Device Removal Female Gestational Age Humans Incidence Infant, Newborn Infant, Very Low Birth Weight Male Prevalence Sepsis Time Factors Vancomycin

Connections (1)

This publication is referenced by other Labnodes entities:

Links