Tolerability to beta-blocker therapy among heart failure patients in clinical practice.

Butler J, Khadim G, Belue R, Chomsky D, Dittus RS, Griffin M, Wilson JR
J Card Fail. 2003 9 (3): 203-9

PMID: 12815570 · DOI:10.1054/jcaf.2003.34

BACKGROUND - Although beta-blockers were well-tolerated by heart failure (HF) patients in clinical trials, tolerability of these drugs in a general population of HF patients is not well-described.

METHODS - We studied a total of 308 encounters with beta-blockers therapy in 268 ambulatory HF patients. Side effects and frequency and predictors of discontinuation of therapy were studied. Independent predictors of discontinuation were assessed.

RESULTS - Weight gain (59%), fatigue (56%), dizziness (41%), and dyspnea (29%) were the most common side effects. Fifty-one patients (19%) were discontinued on therapy with any 1 particular beta-blocker. Fatigue (30%) and hypotension (28%) were the most common reasons for discontinuation. Forty (78%) of these were given a trial with a different beta-blocker. Of these, 22 (55%) attempts with a different beta-blocker were tolerated. Thus the overall absolute discontinuation rate was only 7% for patients who were given a trial with different beta-blockers or 11% for the entire study population. Independent predictors of discontinuation of therapy included advanced symptoms, nonischemic etiology, history of pulmonary disease, and higher diuretic doses.

CONCLUSION - Side effects with beta-blockers in a general population of HF patients are common; however, with changes in medical management, most patients can tolerate them eventually. In case of intolerance to one kind, a trial with a different beta-blocker is indicated.

MeSH Terms (12)

Adrenergic beta-Antagonists Algorithms Dizziness Dyspnea Fatigue Female Heart Failure Humans Hypotension Male Middle Aged Weight Gain

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