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Role of Helicobacter pylori cagA(+) strains and specific host immune responses on the development of premalignant and malignant lesions in the gastric cardia.
Peek RM, Vaezi MF, Falk GW, Goldblum JR, Perez-Perez GI, Richter JE, Blaser MJ
(1999) Int J Cancer 82: 520-4
MeSH Terms: Adenocarcinoma, Age Factors, Aged, Antibodies, Bacterial, Antigens, Bacterial, Bacterial Proteins, Barrett Esophagus, Cardia, Female, Gastritis, Heat-Shock Proteins, Helicobacter pylori, Humans, Immunoglobulin A, Immunoglobulin G, Male, Metaplasia, Middle Aged, Precancerous Conditions, Stomach Neoplasms
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
The incidence rates of gastric cardia and esophageal adenocarcinomas are increasing, but data suggest that carriage of cagA(+) Helicobacter pylori strains may protect against development of Barrett's esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma. Our aims were to examine the relationship between pre-malignant and malignant lesions in the gastric cardia and serum antibodies to H. pylori antigens in patients with and without complications of Barrett's esophagus. The prevalence of carditis was 40% in controls compared with 13% in patients with complicated or uncomplicated Barrett's esophagus and cardia adenocarcinoma (p < 0.001). Cardia intestinal metaplasia (IM) and atrophy were present and concordant in 28% of controls but less frequent in patients with Barrett's alone or with dysplasia/adenocarcinoma (0% for each, p < 0.001). Carriage of cagA(+) strains was present in 34% of patients with carditis and significantly associated with increased frequency and severity of cardia inflammation, IM, and atrophy but not with adenocarcinoma. IgA and HspA seropositivity were significantly increased in H. pylori-colonized patients with carditis compared to persons with normal cardia histology (p Copyright 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
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20 MeSH Terms
Benign breast diseases and premalignant breast disease.
Page DL, Dupont WD
(1998) Arch Pathol Lab Med 122: 1048-50
MeSH Terms: Breast Diseases, Carcinoma, Intraductal, Noninfiltrating, Diagnosis, Differential, Female, Humans, Neoplasm Recurrence, Local, Precancerous Conditions, Terminology as Topic
Added March 21, 2014
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8 MeSH Terms
The effect of folic acid supplementation on the risk for cancer or dysplasia in ulcerative colitis.
Lashner BA, Provencher KS, Seidner DL, Knesebeck A, Brzezinski A
(1997) Gastroenterology 112: 29-32
MeSH Terms: Adult, Cohort Studies, Colitis, Ulcerative, Colorectal Neoplasms, Female, Folic Acid, Hematinics, Humans, Male, Odds Ratio, Precancerous Conditions, Risk Assessment
Show Abstract · Added September 30, 2015
BACKGROUND & AIMS - Two case-control studies have shown that folate may protect against neoplasia in ulcerative colitis. This historical cohort study was performed to better define this association.
METHODS - The records of 98 patients with ulcerative colitis who had disease proximal to the splenic flexure for at least 8 years were reviewed. Documented folate use of at least 6 months was deemed a positive exposure.
RESULTS - Of the patients, 29.6% developed neoplasia and 40.2% took folate supplements. The adjusted relative risk (RR) of neoplasia for patients taking folate was 0.72 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.28-1.83). The dose of folate varied with the risk of neoplasia (RR, 0.54 for 1.0 mg folate; RR, 0.76 for 0.4 mg folate in a multivitamin compared with patients taking no folate). Folate use also varied with the degree of dysplasia (RR for cancer, 0.45; RR for high-grade dysplasia, 0.52; RR for low-grade dysplasia, 0.75 compared with patients with no dysplasia) (P = 0.08).
CONCLUSIONS - Although not statistically significant, the RR for folate supplementation on the risk of neoplasia is < 1 and shows a dose-response effect, consistent with previous studies. Daily folate supplementation may protect against the development of neoplasia in ulcerative colitis.
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12 MeSH Terms
Liver regeneration and hepatocarcinogenesis in transforming growth factor-alpha-targeted mice.
Russell WE, Kaufmann WK, Sitaric S, Luetteke NC, Lee DC
(1996) Mol Carcinog 15: 183-9
MeSH Terms: Animals, Carcinogens, Cocarcinogenesis, Diethylnitrosamine, Hepatectomy, Humans, Iodine Radioisotopes, Liver Neoplasms, Experimental, Liver Regeneration, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Precancerous Conditions, Radioimmunoassay, Transforming Growth Factor alpha
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
Transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF alpha), a member of the epidermal growth factor receptor ligand family, has been implicated in the regeneration and transformation of liver. Our recent development of mice that are homozygous for a disrupted TGF alpha gene allowed us to assess the requirement for this growth factor in these complex processes. We report here that although a 70% hepatectomy produced a significant increase in hepatic TGF alpha protein levels in wild-type mice, liver regeneration nevertheless proceeded normally in the absence of the growth factor. The hepatocyte labeling indices determined for homozygous targeted and wild-type mice at 36 and 48 h after hepatectomy were comparable, and the total liver DNA to body weight ratios 8 d after hepatectomy were essentially identical for the two genotypes. These results indicate that TGF alpha, is not necessary for liver regeneration. To test its requirement in liver carcinogenesis, young mice were administered single doses of diethylnitrosamine (DEN) with or without subsequent chronic treatment with the promoting agent phenobarbital (PB). Both wild-type and homozygous mutant male mice treated with DEN or DEN plus PB developed multiple preneoplastic foci or tumors by 9 mo of age with relatively high incidence. However, while five of 88 tumors in wild-type mice attained a diameter greater than 5 mm and were classified as hepatocellular carcinomas, none of 132 tumors in livers of targeted mice reached this size. Furthermore, three of these large wild-type tumors expressed significantly elevated levels of TGF alpha protein compared with normal liver. These results indicate that TGF alpha is not required for early events in chemically induced hepatocarcinogenesis but suggest that it could be important in the progression from small preneoplastic foci to large tumors.
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15 MeSH Terms
Diagnostic criteria and cancer risk of proliferative breast lesions.
Jensen RA, Dupont WD, Page DL
(1993) J Cell Biochem Suppl 17G: 59-64
MeSH Terms: Biopsy, Breast Diseases, Breast Neoplasms, Carcinoma in Situ, Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast, Carcinoma, Lobular, Female, Humans, Hyperplasia, Precancerous Conditions, Risk Factors
Show Abstract · Added March 21, 2014
Breast cancer risk assessment in women following a benign breast biopsy is a promising area with regard to intermediate endpoint determination, and has been particularly fostered by the consensus agreement concerning the risk attributed to specific diagnoses [1]. Several recent studies have largely verified this approach [2-4], and a recent report demonstrates general agreement among most expert pathologists regarding diagnostic criteria for these lesions [5]. However, in a limited number of cases, determining exact levels of risk for individual patients has been problematic as a result of a failure by pathologists to achieve consensus on diagnostic criteria for these same lesions. This situation has arisen primarily because it is much more tenable to disagree over subjective diagnostic criteria, than it is to argue with robustly supported epidemiological data. Without agreement on reproducible diagnostic criteria, widely promulgated consensus risk estimates for these specific histologic entities are no longer applicable. In addition, those individuals who choose different diagnostic criteria for proliferative breast lesions fail to realize that the terminology, epidemiological risk estimates, and diagnostic criteria used by Dupont and Page are inexorably linked. Since the publication of the consensus statement [1], those using the terms of "atypical ductal hyperplasia" and "atypical lobular hyperplasia" have by default accepted the diagnostic criteria of Dupont and Page. Therefore, surgical pathologists who desire to make use of the consensus risk estimates must familiarize themselves with diagnostic criteria for the various histologic entities that comprise proliferative disease of the breast as defined by Dupont and Page [6].(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
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11 MeSH Terms
A splice variant of alpha 6 integrin is associated with malignant conversion in mouse skin tumorigenesis.
Tennenbaum T, Belanger AJ, Glick AB, Tamura R, Quaranta V, Yuspa SH
(1995) Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 92: 7041-5
MeSH Terms: Alternative Splicing, Animals, Blotting, Western, Carcinoma, Cell Adhesion, Cell Transformation, Neoplastic, Fluorescent Antibody Technique, Integrin alpha6, Integrins, Mice, Mice, Inbred BALB C, Neoplasms, Experimental, Oncogene Proteins v-fos, Papilloma, Polymerase Chain Reaction, Precancerous Conditions, RNA, Messenger, Skin Neoplasms
Show Abstract · Added March 27, 2014
The epithelial-specific integrin alpha 6 beta 4 is suprabasally expressed in benign skin tumors (papillomas) and is diffusely expressed in carcinomas associated with an increase in the proliferating compartment. Analysis of RNA samples by reverse transcriptase-PCR and DNA sequencing revealed that chemically or oncogenically induced papillomas (n = 8) expressed a single transcript of the alpha 6 subunit, identified as the alpha 6 A splice variant. In contrast, carcinomas (n = 13) expressed both alpha 6A and an alternatively spliced form, alpha 6B. Primary keratinocytes and a number of keratinocyte cell lines that vary in biological potential from normal skin, to benign papillomas, to well-differentiated slowly growing carcinomas exclusively expressed alpha 6A. However, I7, an oncogene-induced cell line that produces highly invasive carcinomas, expressed both alpha 6A and alpha 6B transcript and protein. The expression of alpha 6B in I7 cells was associated with increased attachment to a laminin matrix compared to cell lines exclusively expressing alpha 6A. Furthermore, introduction of an alpha 6B expression vector into a papilloma cell line expressing alpha 6A increased laminin attachment. When a papilloma cell line was converted to an invasive carcinoma by introduction of the v-fos oncogene, the malignant cells expressed both alpha 6A and alpha 6B, while the parent cell line and cells transduced with v-jun or c-myc, which retained the papilloma phenotype, expressed only alpha 6A. Comparative analysis of alpha 6B expression in cell lines and their derived tumors indicate that alpha 6B transcripts are more abundant in tumors than cell lines, and alpha 6B is expressed to a greater extent in poorly differentiated tumors. These results establish a link between malignant conversion and invasion of squamous tumor cells and the regulation of transcript processing of the alpha 6 beta 4 integrin.
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18 MeSH Terms
Retinoid refractoriness occurs during lung carcinogenesis despite functional retinoid receptors.
Kim YH, Dohi DF, Han GR, Zou CP, Oridate N, Walsh GL, Nesbitt JC, Xu XC, Hong WK, Lotan R
(1995) Cancer Res 55: 5603-10
MeSH Terms: Animals, Base Sequence, Bronchi, Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung, Cell Count, Cell Division, Cycloheximide, Dactinomycin, Epithelium, Humans, Keratolytic Agents, Lung Neoplasms, Mice, Molecular Sequence Data, Precancerous Conditions, Protein Synthesis Inhibitors, Rats, Receptors, Retinoic Acid, Tretinoin, Tumor Cells, Cultured
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
Retinoids have demonstrated activity in the prevention of second primary tumors in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). They also contribute to the normal growth and differentiation of human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells. Because retinoids mediate their actions through retinoid nuclear receptors (RARs and RXRs), aberrant signaling through retinoid receptors could contribute to lung carcinogenesis. Using a lung carcinogenesis model consisting of normal, premalignant, and malignant HBE cells, we examined all-trans retinoic acid (t-RA)-induced changes in cellular growth. These studies revealed that t-RA treatment inhibited the growth of normal HBE cells, but premalignant and malignant HBE cells were relatively resistant to t-RA. Coincident with the development of retinoid refractoriness, basal expression of the retinoic acid nuclear receptor beta (RAR-beta) increased. Analysis of receptor function by gel shift and transient transfection assays of normal, premalignant, and malignant HBE cells demonstrated that receptor-DNA binding and transcriptional activation properties were intact in the t-RA-refractory malignant HBE cells. To compare these findings to NSCLCs in patients, we investigated retinoid receptor expression in NSCLC biopsies. A subset of the tumors expressed RAR-beta, reflecting the RAR-beta expression observed in the malignant HBE cells in culture. These findings demonstrate that retinoid receptor function was intact in the t-RA-refractory malignant HBE cell line, suggesting that the defect in retinoid signaling in this lung carcinogenesis model is not intrinsic to the retinoid receptors.
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20 MeSH Terms
The epidemiologic study of anatomic markers for increased risk of mammary cancer.
Dupont WD, Rogers LW, Vander Zwaag R, Page DL
(1980) Pathol Res Pract 166: 471-80
MeSH Terms: Breast Neoplasms, Female, Humans, Precancerous Conditions, Prospective Studies, Risk, Tennessee
Added March 21, 2014
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7 MeSH Terms
Are breast cysts a premalignant marker?
Page DL, Dupont WD
(1986) Eur J Cancer Clin Oncol 22: 635-6
MeSH Terms: Breast, Breast Neoplasms, Female, Fibrocystic Breast Disease, Humans, Precancerous Conditions, Prognosis, Risk
Added March 21, 2014
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8 MeSH Terms
Atypical hyperplastic lesions of the female breast. A long-term follow-up study.
Page DL, Dupont WD, Rogers LW, Rados MS
(1985) Cancer 55: 2698-708
MeSH Terms: Adult, Age Factors, Aged, Biopsy, Breast, Breast Neoplasms, Carcinoma in Situ, Carcinoma, Intraductal, Noninfiltrating, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, Hyperplasia, Middle Aged, Precancerous Conditions, Prognosis, Risk, Time Factors
Show Abstract · Added March 21, 2014
A total of 10,542 breast biopsy specimens obtained between 1950 and 1968 were studied. Examples of atypical "ductal" (ADH) and atypical lobular hyperplasia (ALH), defined as having only some features of carcinoma in situ (CIS), were diagnosed in 3.6% of these specimens. In the same series, CIS was diagnosed in 1.7% of biopsy specimens excluding those with invasive cancer. The subsequent risk of invasive breast carcinoma after ALH or ADH was 4-5 times that of the general population. Follow-up was 90% successful and extended 17 years after biopsy. History of breast cancer in a mother, sister, or daughter doubled the risk of subsequent invasive carcinoma development (to 8 times for ALH and 10 times for ADH). The authors conclude that among the epithelial hyperplastic lesions of the human breast, a minority may be recognized by their resemblance to CIS which have a clinically significant elevation of subsequent breast cancer risk. This risk is one-half that of CIS.
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17 MeSH Terms