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Results: 81 to 90 of 92

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Operative technique for safe pulmonary lobectomy in Sprague-Dawley rats.
Roman CD, Hanley GA, Beauchamp RD
(2002) Contemp Top Lab Anim Sci 41: 28-30
MeSH Terms: Anesthesia, Inhalation, Angiogenesis Inhibitors, Animals, Indoles, Lung, Male, Models, Animal, Pneumonectomy, Postoperative Complications, Pyrroles, Rats, Rats, Sprague-Dawley, Surgery, Veterinary, Thoracotomy, Wound Healing
Show Abstract · Added May 3, 2013
To perform safe and effective animal surgery, it is essential to follow a well- disciplined approach. We recently have embarked on a variety of wound-healing studies that involve multiple operative techniques including thoracotomy with lobectomy. Such procedures require specific attention to effective anesthesia and ventilation as well as a structured and safe approach to the actual procedure. We have developed operative techniques for thoracotomy and pulmonary lobectomy that limit animal morbidity and mortality. Using general anesthesia, we safely and effectively completed right thoracotomy and pulmonary lobectomy in 51 of the 54 (>94%) of the Sprague-Dawley rats that were our subjects. We effectively ventilated the animals with inhalation anesthesia, avoiding the need for endotracheal intubation. The three mortalities occurred during early experiments and were attributable to easily identified technical errors. Our animals did not experience postoperative respiratory complications. Postoperative recovery was excellent, and no appreciable postoperative morbidity was encountered.
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15 MeSH Terms
Blockade of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor and epidermal growth factor receptor signaling for therapy of metastatic human pancreatic cancer.
Baker CH, Solorzano CC, Fidler IJ
(2002) Cancer Res 62: 1996-2003
MeSH Terms: Angiogenesis Inhibitors, Animals, Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols, Apoptosis, Cell Division, Deoxycytidine, Endothelium, Vascular, ErbB Receptors, Humans, Immunohistochemistry, Male, Mice, Mice, Nude, Neoplasm Metastasis, Neovascularization, Pathologic, Pancreatic Neoplasms, Phthalazines, Pyridines, Pyrimidines, Pyrroles, Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Kinases, Receptors, Growth Factor, Receptors, Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor, Signal Transduction, Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
We determined whether concurrent blockage of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor and epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor signaling by two novel tyrosine kinase inhibitors, PTK 787 and PKI 166, respectively, can inhibit angiogenesis and, hence, the growth and metastasis of human pancreatic carcinoma in nude mice. Highly metastatic human pancreatic carcinoma L3.6pl cells were injected into the pancreas of nude mice. Seven days later, groups of mice began receiving oral doses of PTK 787 and PKI 166 three times weekly. Some groups of mice also received i.p. injections of gemcitabine twice a week. The mice were necropsied when the control mice became moribund. Treatment with PTK 787 and PKI 166, with gemcitabine alone, or with the combination of PTK 787, PKI 166, and gemcitabine produced 69, 50, and 97% reduction in the volume of pancreatic tumors, respectively. Administration of protein tyrosine kinase inhibitors and gemcitabine also significantly decreased the incidence of lymph node and liver metastasis. The therapeutic efficacy directly correlated with a decrease in circulating proangiogenic molecules (VEGF, interleukin-8), a decrease in microvessel density, a decrease in proliferating cell nuclear antigen staining, and an increase in apoptosis of tumor cells and endothelial cells. Therapies produced by combining gemcitabine with either PKI 166 or PTK 787 were similar to those produced by combining gemcitabine with both PKI 166 and PTK 787. These results suggest that blockade of either epidermal growth factor receptor or VEGF receptor signaling combined with chemotherapy provides an effective approach to the therapy of pancreatic cancer.
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25 MeSH Terms
Endothelial survival factors as targets for antineoplastic therapy.
Reinmuth N, Stoeltzing O, Liu W, Ahmad SA, Jung YD, Fan F, Parikh A, Ellis LM
(2001) Cancer J 7 Suppl 3: S109-19
MeSH Terms: Angiogenesis Inhibitors, Angiopoietin-1, Animals, Antineoplastic Agents, Cell Survival, Endothelial Growth Factors, Endothelium, Vascular, Enzyme Inhibitors, Humans, Indoles, Integrins, Lymphokines, Membrane Glycoproteins, Neoplasms, Neovascularization, Pathologic, Pericytes, Pyrroles, Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Kinases, Receptor, TIE-2, Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A, Vascular Endothelial Growth Factors
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
Angiogenesis is essential for the growth and metastasis of solid tumors. The angiogenic process includes not only development of new blood vessels but also maintenance of the existing vasculature. Recent studies have demonstrated that several factors induce angiogenesis and also function as endothelial cell survival factors. Vascular endothelial growth factor, a potent angiogenic factor, is an endothelial cell survival factor whose tyrosine kinase receptors are limited to endothelial cells. Members of the angiopoietin family also bind to an endothelial cell-specific tyrosine kinase receptor. Angiopoietin-1 has been shown to stabilize endothelial cell networks, whereas angiopoietin-2 is antagonistic to angiopoietin-1 and destabilizes endothelial cell networks. Pericytes contribute to endothelial cell stabilization by cell-cell contact, secretion of survival factors, or both. In addition, integrins may function as endothelial cell survival factors by numerous mechanisms after binding to the extracellular matrix. The effects of many endothelial cell survival factors act in concert with vascular endothelial growth factor to enhance this essential step in angiogenesis. Targeting any of the aforementioned mechanisms for endothelial cell survival may provide novel therapeutic antineoplastic strategies.
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21 MeSH Terms
Inhibition of growth and metastasis of human pancreatic cancer growing in nude mice by PTK 787/ZK222584, an inhibitor of the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases.
Solorzano CC, Baker CH, Bruns CJ, Killion JJ, Ellis LM, Wood J, Fidler IJ
(2001) Cancer Biother Radiopharm 16: 359-70
MeSH Terms: Adenocarcinoma, Angiogenesis Inhibitors, Animals, Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols, Apoptosis, Deoxycytidine, Enzyme Inhibitors, Humans, In Situ Nick-End Labeling, Male, Mice, Mice, Nude, Neoplasm Invasiveness, Neoplasm Metastasis, Neoplasm Proteins, Neoplasm Transplantation, Pancreatic Neoplasms, Phthalazines, Platelet Endothelial Cell Adhesion Molecule-1, Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen, Pyridines, Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Kinases, Receptors, Growth Factor, Receptors, Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor, Tumor Cells, Cultured, Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
Since vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) plays a major role in tumor angiogenesis, we determined whether blockage of VEGF receptor signaling using a novel tyrosine kinase inhibitor (PTK 787) decreases the growth and metastasis of human pancreatic carcinoma growing orthotopically in nude mice. Human pancreatic L3.6pl cells were injected into the pancreas of nude mice. Seven days later, groups of mice were given daily oral administrations of PTK 787 alone, twice weekly i.p. injections of gemcitabine, or combination therapy. The mice were necropsied when control mice became moribund (day 35). Therapy with PTK 787 alone, gemcitabine alone, or the combination of both agents produced respectively 60%, 70%, and 81% inhibition in the volume of pancreatic cancers. The combination therapy significantly decreased the incidence of lymph node and liver metastasis, leading to a significant increase in survival. Microvessel density (MVD) was significantly decreased in tumors treated with either PTK 787 alone or PTK 787 plus gemcitabine. MVD directly correlated with tumor cell proliferation and inversely correlated with apoptosis of tumor cells and associated endothelial cells. Collectively, our results demonstrate that blockade of VEGF-R signaling may provide an additional approach to the therapy of pancreatic cancer.
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26 MeSH Terms
Angiogenesis and cancer metastasis: antiangiogenic therapy of human pancreatic adenocarcinoma.
Baker CH, Solorzano CC, Fidler IJ
(2001) Int J Clin Oncol 6: 59-65
MeSH Terms: Angiogenesis Inhibitors, Carcinoma, Endothelial Growth Factors, Humans, Lymphokines, Neoplasm Metastasis, Neoplastic Cells, Circulating, Neovascularization, Pathologic, Pancreatic Neoplasms, Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A, Vascular Endothelial Growth Factors
Added March 5, 2014
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11 MeSH Terms
In vivo intracellular signaling as a marker of antiangiogenic activity.
Solorzano CC, Jung YD, Bucana CD, McConkey DJ, Gallick GE, McMahon G, Ellis LM
(2001) Cancer Res 61: 7048-51
MeSH Terms: Androstadienes, Angiogenesis Inhibitors, Biomarkers, Tumor, Blotting, Western, Endothelial Growth Factors, Endothelium, Vascular, Enzyme Activation, Enzyme Inhibitors, Flavonoids, Fluorescent Antibody Technique, Humans, Indoles, Liver Neoplasms, Lymphokines, MAP Kinase Signaling System, Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Kinases, Neovascularization, Pathologic, Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases, Phosphoinositide-3 Kinase Inhibitors, Phosphorylation, Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases, Proto-Oncogene Proteins, Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt, Pyrroles, Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Kinases, Receptors, Growth Factor, Receptors, Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor, Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A, Vascular Endothelial Growth Factors, Wortmannin
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
Alterations in endothelial cell (EC) signaling could serve as a marker of effective antiangiogenic therapy. We determined the effect of an antiangiogenic tyrosine kinase inhibitor, SU6668, on tumor EC signaling in liver metastases in mice. In vitro immunofluorescence verified that pretreatment of ECs with SU6668 before exposure to VEGF decreased in vitro phosphorylation of Erk and Akt. Using double-fluorescence immunohistochemistry, phosphorylated Erk and Akt were constitutively expressed in ECs in liver metastases in untreated mice, but SU6668 blocked activation of these signaling intermediates. Determining the activation status of the Erk and Akt signaling pathways in tumor ECs may serve as a surrogate marker for the effectiveness of antiangiogenic regimens.
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30 MeSH Terms
Matrix metalloproteinases as targets for therapy in Kaposi sarcoma.
Fingleton B, Matrisian LM
(2001) Curr Opin Oncol 13: 368-73
MeSH Terms: Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome, Angiogenesis Inhibitors, Humans, Matrix Metalloproteinases, Neovascularization, Pathologic, Sarcoma, Kaposi
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
Acquired immune deficiency syndrome-associated Kaposi sarcoma is a progressive and occasionally fatal condition. The strong angiogenic component of this disease makes it particularly suitable for treatment with the emerging class of drugs that act as antiangiogenic agents. Matrix metalloproteinases have been shown to play prominent roles in the angiogenic process, and small molecule inhibitors of these enzymes are currently being tested as antiangiogenic agents in various malignancies. Given that matrix metalloproteinases contribute to multiple steps of the angiogenic process, inhibitors of these enzymes, either alone or in combination with other agents, may represent a particularly effective therapeutic approach for Kaposi sarcoma.
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6 MeSH Terms
Inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor signaling leads to reversal of tumor resistance to radiotherapy.
Geng L, Donnelly E, McMahon G, Lin PC, Sierra-Rivera E, Oshinka H, Hallahan DE
(2001) Cancer Res 61: 2413-9
MeSH Terms: Angiogenesis Inhibitors, Animals, Cell Survival, Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation, Endothelial Growth Factors, Endothelium, Vascular, Enzyme Inhibitors, Glioblastoma, Indoles, Lymphokines, Melanoma, Experimental, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Neovascularization, Pathologic, Pyrroles, Radiation Tolerance, Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Kinases, Receptors, Growth Factor, Receptors, Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor, Signal Transduction, Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A, Vascular Endothelial Growth Factors
Show Abstract · Added February 28, 2014
Certain refractory neoplasms, such as glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and melanoma, demonstrate a resistant tumor phenotype in vivo. We observed that these refractory tumor models (GBM and melanoma) contain blood vessels that are relatively resistant to radiotherapy. To determine whether the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (Flk-1/KDR) may be a therapeutic target to improve the effects of radiotherapy, we used the soluble extracellular component of Flk-1 (ExFlk), which blocks vascular endothelial growth factor binding to Flk-1 receptor expressed on the tumor endothelium. Both sFlk-1 and the Flk-1-specifc inhibitor SU5416 eliminated the resistance phenotype in GBM and melanoma microvasculature as determined by both the vascular window and Doppler blood flow methods. Human microendothelial cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cells showed minimal radiation-induced apoptosis. The Flk-1 antagonists sFlk-1 and SU5416 reverted these cell models to apoptosis-prone phenotype. Flk-1 antagonists also reverted GBM and melanoma tumor models to radiation-sensitive phenotype after treatment with 3 Gy. These findings demonstrate that the tumor microenvironment including the survival of tumor-associated endothelial cells contributes to tumor blood vessel resistance to therapy.
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22 MeSH Terms
The effect of an angiostatic steroid on neovascularization in a rat model of retinopathy of prematurity.
Penn JS, Rajaratnam VS, Collier RJ, Clark AF
(2001) Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci 42: 283-90
MeSH Terms: Angiogenesis Inhibitors, Animals, Animals, Newborn, Blotting, Northern, Disease Models, Animal, Female, Humans, Infant, Newborn, Injections, Male, Nuclease Protection Assays, Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor 1, Pregnadienediols, RNA Probes, RNA, Messenger, Random Allocation, Rats, Rats, Sprague-Dawley, Retinal Neovascularization, Retinopathy of Prematurity, Vitreous Body
Show Abstract · Added October 9, 2013
PURPOSE - The inhibition of angiogenesis by angiostatic steroids has been demonstrated in a variety of systems, including rabbit and rat cornea. There is considerable interest in the therapeutic potential of this class of compounds for angiogenic ocular conditions such as diabetic retinopathy, macular degeneration, and retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). This study was designed to test the capacity of an angiostatic steroid, anecortave acetate, to inhibit retinal neovascularization using a rat model of ROP and to investigate the mechanism of the effect.
METHODS - At birth, rats were placed in an atmosphere of varying oxygen that produces retinal neovascular changes that approximate human ROP. The rats then received intravitreal injections of either anecortave acetate or vehicle at varying times, and all were subsequently placed in room air. Retinas were assessed for plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1 mRNA level by RNase protection assay at 1, 2, and 3 days after injection and for normal and abnormal blood vessel growth 3 days later.
RESULTS - A significant reduction in the severity of abnormal retinal neovascularization was observed in the steroid-treated eyes compared with vehicle-injected eyes in ROP rats, yet the extent of normal total retinal vascular area was not significantly different. The drug had no effect on either retinal vascular area or neovascularization when tested in room air-raised control rats. Drug-injected eyes demonstrated a six- to ninefold increase in PAI-1 mRNA at 1 to 3 days after injection.
CONCLUSIONS - This study represents the first therapeutic effect of an angiostatic steroid in an animal model of neovascular retinopathy. Additionally, the induction of PAI-1 indicates a mechanism of action for this class of compounds, and this is a novel finding in vivo. Because anecortave acetate significantly inhibited pathologic retinal angiogenesis in this model, while not significantly affecting normal intraretinal vessels, it holds therapeutic potential for a number of human ocular conditions in which angiogenesis plays a critical pathologic role.
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21 MeSH Terms
The CXC chemokine receptor 2, CXCR2, is the putative receptor for ELR+ CXC chemokine-induced angiogenic activity.
Addison CL, Daniel TO, Burdick MD, Liu H, Ehlert JE, Xue YY, Buechi L, Walz A, Richmond A, Strieter RM
(2000) J Immunol 165: 5269-77
MeSH Terms: Administration, Topical, Amino Acid Motifs, Amino Acid Sequence, Angiogenesis Inhibitors, Animals, Antibodies, Blocking, Cell Migration Inhibition, Cells, Cultured, Chemokines, CXC, Cornea, Endothelium, Vascular, Humans, Immune Sera, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Microcirculation, Molecular Sequence Data, Neovascularization, Physiologic, Pertussis Toxin, Rats, Receptors, Interleukin-8B, Virulence Factors, Bordetella
Show Abstract · Added May 31, 2013
We have previously shown that members of the ELR(+) CXC chemokine family, including IL-8; growth-related oncogenes alpha, beta, and gamma; granulocyte chemotactic protein 2; and epithelial neutrophil-activating protein-78, can mediate angiogenesis in the absence of preceding inflammation. To date, the receptor on endothelial cells responsible for chemotaxis and neovascularization mediated by these ELR(+) CXC chemokines has not been determined. Because all ELR(+) CXC chemokines bind to CXC chemokine receptor 2 (CXCR2), we hypothesized that CXCR2 is the putative receptor for ELR(+) CXC chemokine-mediated angiogenesis. To test this postulate, we first determined whether cultured human microvascular endothelial cells expressed CXCR2. CXCR2 was detected in human microvascular endothelial cells at the protein level by both Western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry using polyclonal Abs specific for human CXCR2. To determine whether CXCR2 played a functional role in angiogenesis, we determined whether this receptor was involved in endothelial cell chemotaxis. We found that microvascular endothelial cell chemotaxis in response to ELR(+) CXC chemokines was inhibited by anti-CXCR2 Abs. In addition, endothelial cell chemotaxis in response to ELR(+) CXC chemokines was sensitive to pertussis toxin, suggesting a role for G protein-linked receptor mechanisms in this biological response. The importance of CXCR2 in mediating ELR(+) CXC chemokine-induced angiogenesis in vivo was also demonstrated by the lack of angiogenic activity induced by ELR(+) CXC chemokines in the presence of neutralizing Abs to CXCR2 in the rat corneal micropocket assay, or in the corneas of CXCR2(-/-) mice. We thus conclude that CXCR2 is the receptor responsible for ELR(+) CXC chemokine-mediated angiogenesis.
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23 MeSH Terms