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Adenovirus-mediated p53 gene transfer in sequence with cisplatin to tumors of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer.
Nemunaitis J, Swisher SG, Timmons T, Connors D, Mack M, Doerksen L, Weill D, Wait J, Lawrence DD, Kemp BL, Fossella F, Glisson BS, Hong WK, Khuri FR, Kurie JM, Lee JJ, Lee JS, Nguyen DM, Nesbitt JC, Perez-Soler R, Pisters KM, Putnam JB, Richli WR, Shin DM, Walsh GL, Merritt J, Roth J
(2000) J Clin Oncol 18: 609-22
MeSH Terms: Adenoviruses, Human, Adult, Aged, Antibodies, Viral, Antineoplastic Agents, Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung, Cisplatin, Combined Modality Therapy, DNA Mutational Analysis, DNA, Neoplasm, Female, Gene Transfer Techniques, Genes, p53, Genetic Vectors, Humans, In Situ Nick-End Labeling, Injections, Intralesional, Lung Neoplasms, Male, Middle Aged, Organ Specificity, Staining and Labeling
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
PURPOSE - To determine the safety and tolerability of adenovirus-mediated p53 (Adp53) gene transfer in sequence with cisplatin when given by intratumor injection in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC).
PATIENTS AND METHODS - Patients with advanced NSCLC and abnormal p53 function were enrolled onto cohorts receiving escalating dose levels of Adp53 (1 x 10(6) to 1 x 10(11) plaque-forming units [PFU]). Patients were administered intravenous cisplatin 80 mg/m(2) on day 1 and study vector on day 4 for a total of up to six courses (28 days per course). Apoptosis was determined by the terminal deoxynucleotidyl- transferase-dUTP nick-end labeling assay. Evidence of vector-specific sequences were determined using reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Vector dissemination and biodistribution was monitored using a series of assays (cytopathic effects assay, Ad5 hexon enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, vector-specific polymerase chain reaction assay, and antibody response assay).
RESULTS - Twenty-four patients (median age, 64 years) received a total of 83 intratumor injections with Adp53. The maximum dose administered was 1 x 10(11) PFU per dose. Transient fever related to Adp53 injection developed in eight of 24 patients. Seventeen patients achieved a best clinical response of stable disease, two patients achieved a partial response, four patients had progressive disease, and one patient was not assessable. A mean apoptotic index between baseline and follow-up measurements increased from 0.010 to 0.044 (P =.011). Intratumor transgene mRNA was identified in 43% of assessable patients.
CONCLUSION - Intratumoral injection with Adp53 in combination with cisplatin is well tolerated, and there is evidence of clinical activity.
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22 MeSH Terms
Divergence of brain prostaglandin H synthase activity and oxidative damage in mice with encephalitis.
Valyi-Nagy T, Sidell KR, Marnett LJ, Roberts LJ, Dermody TS, Morrow JD, Montine TJ
(1999) J Neuropathol Exp Neurol 58: 1269-75
MeSH Terms: Aldehydes, Animals, Brain, Cell Line, Encephalitis, Viral, Immunohistochemistry, In Situ Nick-End Labeling, Lipid Peroxides, Mice, Oxidation-Reduction, Prostaglandin-Endoperoxide Synthases, Reoviridae Infections
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
Several lines of evidence point to inflammation and increased oxidant injury in brain regions of patients with Alzheimer disease (AD). Prostaglandin H synthase (PGHS) catalyzes the limiting step in prostaglandin synthesis and generates a potent oxidizing agent as by-product. One form of PGHS, PGHS-2, is induced by pro-inflammatory signals; thus leading to the 2-step hypothesis that pro-inflammatory signals in AD brain induce PGHS-2 that in turn contributes to brain oxidant injury. Here we have tested directly this 2-step hypothesis in a murine reovirus type 3 encephalitis model by measuring cerebral PGHS activity and quantifying oxidant injury. Our results showed a robust chronic inflammatory infiltrate and a 2-fold increase in PGHS activity in encephalitic mice compared with controls. Despite these changes, there was no significant increase in F2-isoprostanes or F4-neuroprostanes, accurate in vivo biomarkers of oxidant injury, and only minimal accumulation of protein adducts from the lipid peroxidation product 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal in the most intensely inflamed brain regions. These results challenge the proposal of others that pro-inflammatory induction of PGHS activity significantly contributes to oxidant injury in brain.
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12 MeSH Terms
Inhibition of copper-zinc superoxide dismutase induces cell growth, hypertrophic phenotype, and apoptosis in neonatal rat cardiac myocytes in vitro.
Siwik DA, Tzortzis JD, Pimental DR, Chang DL, Pagano PJ, Singh K, Sawyer DB, Colucci WS
(1999) Circ Res 85: 147-53
MeSH Terms: Animals, Animals, Newborn, Apoptosis, Cardiomegaly, Cell Division, Cell Membrane, Cells, Cultured, Chelating Agents, Ditiocarb, Gene Expression Regulation, Enzymologic, Hypertrophy, In Situ Nick-End Labeling, In Vitro Techniques, Muscle Fibers, Skeletal, Myocardium, Oxidative Stress, Phenotype, Rats, Superoxide Dismutase, Superoxides
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
Oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathophysiology of myocardial failure. We tested the hypothesis that inhibition of endogenous antioxidant enzymes can regulate the phenotype of cardiac myocytes. Neonatal rat ventricular myocytes in vitro were exposed to diethyldithiocarbamic acid (DDC), an inhibitor of cytosolic (Cu, Zn) and extracellular superoxide dismutase (SOD). DDC inhibited SOD activity and increased intracellular superoxide in a concentration-dependent manner. A low concentration (1 micromol/L) of DDC stimulated myocyte growth, as demonstrated by increases in protein synthesis, cellular protein, prepro-atrial natriuretic peptide, and c-fos mRNAs and decreased sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)ATPase mRNA. These actions were all inhibited by the superoxide scavenger Tiron (4,5-dihydroxy-1,3-benzene disulfonic acid). Higher concentrations of DDC (100 micromol/L) stimulated myocyte apoptosis, as evidenced by DNA laddering, characteristic nuclear morphology, in situ terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated nick end-labeling (TUNEL), and increased bax mRNA expression. DDC-stimulated apoptosis was inhibited by the SOD/catalase mimetic EUK-8. The growth and apoptotic effects of DDC were mimicked by superoxide generation with xanthine plus xanthine oxidase. Thus, increased intracellular superoxide resulting from inhibition of SOD causes activation of a growth program and apoptosis in cardiac myocytes. These findings support a role for oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of myocardial remodeling and failure.
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20 MeSH Terms
NeuroD is required for differentiation of the granule cells in the cerebellum and hippocampus.
Miyata T, Maeda T, Lee JE
(1999) Genes Dev 13: 1647-52
MeSH Terms: Animals, Apoptosis, Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factors, Cell Count, Cell Differentiation, Cerebellum, Genetic Therapy, Hippocampus, In Situ Nick-End Labeling, Insulin, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Mice, Neurologic Mutants, Mice, Transgenic, Nerve Tissue Proteins, Neurons, Phenotype, Promoter Regions, Genetic, Recombinant Fusion Proteins, Transgenes
Show Abstract · Added July 7, 2015
NeuroD, a bHLH transcription factor, is implicated in differentiation of neurons and pancreatic beta cells. NeuroD-null mice die shortly after birth due to severe neonatal diabetes. To examine if there is postnatal neuronal phenotype in these mice, we rescued them from neonatal lethality by introducing a transgene encoding the mouse neuroD gene under the insulin promoter. These mice survive to adulthood but display severe neurological phenotype due to neuronal deficit in the granule layers of the cerebellum and hippocampus. We show here that NeuroD is required for these postnatally generated microneurons to undergo proper differentiation, the absence of which results in cell death.
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20 MeSH Terms
Mechanisms of apoptosis in T cells from patients with renal cell carcinoma.
Uzzo RG, Rayman P, Kolenko V, Clark PE, Bloom T, Ward AM, Molto L, Tannenbaum C, Worford LJ, Bukowski R, Tubbs R, Hsi ED, Bander NH, Novick AC, Finke JH
(1999) Clin Cancer Res 5: 1219-29
MeSH Terms: Apoptosis, Blood Cells, Carcinoma, Renal Cell, DNA Fragmentation, Fas Ligand Protein, Humans, In Situ Nick-End Labeling, Ionomycin, Jurkat Cells, Kidney Neoplasms, Lymphocyte Activation, Lymphocytes, Tumor-Infiltrating, Membrane Glycoproteins, Muromonab-CD3, Neoplasm Proteins, Polymerase Chain Reaction, RNA, Messenger, RNA, Neoplasm, T-Lymphocytes, Cytotoxic, Tetradecanoylphorbol Acetate, Tumor Cells, Cultured, fas Receptor
Show Abstract · Added May 27, 2014
Tumors may escape immune recognition and destruction through the induction of apoptosis in activated T lymphocytes. Results from several laboratories suggest that FasL (L/CD95L) expression in tumors may be responsible for this process. In this study of patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC), we provide evidence for two mechanisms of T-cell apoptosis. One mechanism involves the induction of apoptosis via FasL expression in tumor cells. This is supported by several observations, including the fact that tumor cells in situ as well as cultured cell lines expressed FasL mRNA and protein by a variety of techniques. The FasL in RCC is functional because in coculture experiments, FasL+ tumors induced apoptosis in Fas-sensitive Jurkat T cells and in activated peripheral blood T cells but not in resting peripheral blood T cells. Most importantly, antibody to FasL partially blocked apoptosis of the activated T cells. Moreover, Fas was expressed by T cells derived from the peripheral blood (53% median) and tumor (44.3% median) of RCC patients. Finally, in situ staining for DNA breaks demonstrated apoptosis in a subset of T cells infiltrating renal tumors. These studies also identified a second mechanism of apoptosis in RCC patient peripheral T cells. Whereas these cells did not display DNA breaks when freshly isolated or after culture for 24 h in medium, peripheral blood T cells from RCC patients underwent activation-induced cell death after stimulation with either phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate/ionomycin or anti-CD3/CD28 antibodies. Apoptosis mediated by exposure to FasL in tumor cells or through T-cell activation may contribute to the failure of RCC patients to develop an effective T-cell-mediated antitumor response.
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22 MeSH Terms
Adenovirus-mediated p53 gene transfer in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer.
Swisher SG, Roth JA, Nemunaitis J, Lawrence DD, Kemp BL, Carrasco CH, Connors DG, El-Naggar AK, Fossella F, Glisson BS, Hong WK, Khuri FR, Kurie JM, Lee JJ, Lee JS, Mack M, Merritt JA, Nguyen DM, Nesbitt JC, Perez-Soler R, Pisters KM, Putnam JB, Richli WR, Savin M, Schrump DS, Shin DM, Shulkin A, Walsh GL, Wait J, Weill D, Waugh MK
(1999) J Natl Cancer Inst 91: 763-71
MeSH Terms: Adenoviridae, Adult, Aged, Bronchoscopy, Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung, DNA, Viral, Disease Progression, Female, Gene Transfer Techniques, Genes, p53, Genetic Therapy, Genetic Vectors, Humans, In Situ Nick-End Labeling, Lung Neoplasms, Male, Middle Aged, Patient Selection, Survival Analysis, Tomography, X-Ray Computed, Treatment Outcome
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
BACKGROUND - Preclinical studies in animal models have demonstrated tumor regression following intratumoral administration of an adenovirus vector containing wild-type p53 complementary DNA (Ad-p53). Therefore, in a phase I clinical trial, we administered Ad-p53 to 28 patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) whose cancers had progressed on conventional treatments.
METHODS - Patients received up to six, monthly intratumoral injections of Ad-p53 by use of computed tomography-guided percutaneous fine-needle injection (23 patients) or bronchoscopy (five patients). The doses ranged from 10(6) plaque-forming units (PFU) to 10(11) PFU.
RESULTS - Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis showed the presence of adenovirus vector DNA in 18 (86%) of 21 patients with evaluable posttreatment biopsy specimens; vector-specific p53 messenger RNA was detected by means of reverse transcription-PCR analysis in 12 (46%) of 26 patients. Apoptosis (programmed cell death) was demonstrated by increased terminal deoxynucleotide transferase-mediated biotin uridine triphosphate nick-end labeling (TUNEL) staining in posttreatment biopsy specimens from 11 patients. Vector-related toxicity was minimal (National Cancer Institute's Common Toxicity Criteria: grade 3 = one patient; grade 4 = no patients) in 84 courses of treatment, despite repeated injections (up to six) in 23 patients. Therapeutic activity in 25 evaluable patients included partial responses in two patients (8%) and disease stabilization (range, 2-14 months) in 16 patients (64%); the remaining seven patients (28%) exhibited disease progression.
CONCLUSIONS - Repeated intratumoral injections of Ad-p53 appear to be well tolerated, result in transgene expression of wild-type p53, and seem to mediate antitumor activity in a subset of patients with advanced NSCLC.
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21 MeSH Terms
The renal lesions that develop in neonatal mice during angiotensin inhibition mimic obstructive nephropathy.
Miyazaki Y, Tsuchida S, Fogo A, Ichikawa I
(1999) Kidney Int 55: 1683-95
MeSH Terms: Actins, Angiotensin II, Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors, Angiotensinogen, Animals, Animals, Newborn, Apoptosis, Cell Division, Disease Models, Animal, Epidermal Growth Factor, Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental, In Situ Hybridization, In Situ Nick-End Labeling, Insulin-Like Growth Factor I, Kidney Diseases, Kidney Medulla, Kidney Pelvis, Macrophages, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Muscle, Smooth, Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A, Platelet-Derived Growth Factor, Pressure, RNA, Messenger, Transforming Growth Factor beta, Ureter, Ureteral Obstruction
Show Abstract · Added January 20, 2012
BACKGROUND - Inhibition of angiotensin action, pharmacologically or genetically, during the neonatal period leads to renal anomalies involving hypoplastic papilla and dilated calyx. Recently, we documented that angiotensinogen (Agt -/-) or angiotensin type 1 receptor nullizygotes (Agtr1 -/-) do not develop renal pelvis nor ureteral peristaltic movement, both of which are essential for isolating the kidney from the high downstream ureteral pressure. We therefore examined whether these renal anomalies could be characterized as "obstructive" nephropathy.
METHODS - Agtr1 -/- neonatal mice were compared with wild-type neonates, the latter subjected to surgical complete unilateral ureteral ligation (UUO), by analyzing morphometrical, immunohistochemical, and molecular indices. Agtr1 -/- mice were also subjected to a complete UUO and were compared with wild-type UUO mice by quantitative analysis. To assess the function of the urinary tract, baseline pelvic and ureteral pressures were measured.
RESULTS - The structural anomalies were qualitatively indistinguishable between the Agtr1 -/- without surgical obstruction versus the wild type with complete UUO. Thus, in both kidneys, the calyx was enlarged, whereas the papilla was atrophic; tubulointerstitial cells underwent proliferation and also apoptosis. Both were also characterized by interstitial macrophage infiltration and fibrosis, and within the local lesion, transforming growth factor-beta 1, platelet-derived growth factor-A and insulin-like growth factor-1 were up-regulated, whereas epidermal growth factor was down-regulated. Moreover, quantitative differences that exist between mutant kidneys without surgical obstruction and wild-type kidneys with surgical UUO were abolished when both underwent the same complete surgical UUO. The hydraulic baseline pressure was always lower in the pelvis than that in the ureter in the wild type, whereas this pressure gradient was reversed in the mutant.
CONCLUSION - The abnormal kidney structure that develops in neonates during angiotensin inhibition is attributed largely to "functional obstruction" of the urinary tract caused by the defective development of peristaltic machinery.
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28 MeSH Terms
A transient role for ciliary neurotrophic factor in chick photoreceptor development.
Fuhrmann S, Heller S, Rohrer H, Hofmann HD
(1998) J Neurobiol 37: 672-83
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antioxidants, Apoptosis, Ascorbic Acid, Cell Differentiation, Cells, Cultured, Chick Embryo, Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor, Immunohistochemistry, In Situ Nick-End Labeling, Nerve Tissue Proteins, Photoreceptor Cells, Vertebrate, Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Kinases, Receptor, Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor, Receptors, Nerve Growth Factor, Retinal Rod Photoreceptor Cells, Rod Opsins, Stem Cells, Time Factors, Vitamin A, Vitamin E
Show Abstract · Added November 19, 2015
Previous studies suggest that ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) may represent one of the extrinsic signals controlling the development of vertebrate retinal photoreceptors. In dissociated cultures from embryonic chick retina, exogenously applied CNTF has been shown to act on postmitotic rod precursor cells, resulting in an two- to fourfold increase in the number of cells acquiring an opsin-positive phenotype. We now demonstrate that the responsiveness of photoreceptor precursors to CNTF is confined to a brief phase between their final mitosis and their terminal differentiation owing to the temporally restricted expression of the CNTF receptor (CNTFR alpha). As shown immunocytochemically, CNTFR alpha expression in the presumptive photoreceptor layer of the chick retina starts at embryonic day 8 (E8) and is rapidly down-regulated a few days later prior to the differentiation of opsin-positive photoreceptors, both in vivo and in dissociated cultures from E8. We further show that the CNTF-dependent in vitro differentiation of rods is followed by a phase of photoreceptor-specific apoptotic cell death. The loss of differentiated rods during this apoptotic phase can be prevented by micromolar concentrations of retinol. Our results provide evidence that photoreceptor development depends on the sequential action of different extrinsic signals. The time course of CNTFR alpha expression and the in vitro effects suggest that CNTF or a related molecule is required during early stages of rod differentiation, while differentiated rods depend on additional protective factors for survival.
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21 MeSH Terms