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Cyclooxygenase-2-dependent prostacyclin formation is regulated by low density lipoprotein cholesterol in vitro.
Smith LH, Boutaud O, Breyer M, Morrow JD, Oates JA, Vaughan DE
(2002) Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol 22: 983-8
MeSH Terms: Aspirin, Cells, Cultured, Cholesterol, Cholesterol, LDL, Cyclooxygenase 1, Cyclooxygenase 2, Dose-Response Relationship, Drug, Endothelium, Vascular, Enzyme Inhibitors, Epoprostenol, Humans, Isoenzymes, Membrane Proteins, Prostaglandin-Endoperoxide Synthases, RNA, Messenger, Transcription, Genetic, Umbilical Veins
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
Reduction of plasma low density lipoprotein (LDL) levels is associated with a reduced risk of myocardial infarction, stroke, and death. Some of this clinical benefit may be derived from an improvement in endothelium-dependent vasodilation. In the present study, we examined the effects of LDL reduction on cyclooxygenase (COX) activity and prostacyclin (PGI2) production. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells exposed to reduced concentrations of LDL demonstrated increased PGI2 production in a dose-dependent manner (from 0.75+/-0.2 to 2.6+/-0.2 ng/mL, P<0.0001). This alteration in PGI2 production did not result from LDL-induced changes in PGI2 synthase expression. However, selective inhibition of COX-2, but not COX-1, blocked PGI2 production under low cholesterol conditions. Addition of exogenous cholesterol induces dose-dependent reductions in endothelial COX-2 expression as measured by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and by Western blotting. Pretreatment of cells with actinomycin D, a transcription inhibitor, reduced COX-2-derived PGI2 production by 45.9% (from 0.55+/-0.09 to 0.25+/-0.08 ng/mL). Taken together, these observations indicate that endothelial PGI2 production is regulated by cholesterol at the transcriptional level and that cholesterol-sensitive transcriptional pathways that regulate COX-2 expression are present in vascular tissue.
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17 MeSH Terms
Caloric restriction lowers plasma lipoprotein (a) in male but not female rhesus monkeys.
Edwards IJ, Rudel LL, Terry JG, Kemnitz JW, Weindruch R, Zaccaro DJ, Cefalu WT
(2001) Exp Gerontol 36: 1413-8
MeSH Terms: Aging, Animals, Arteriosclerosis, Cholesterol, Cholesterol, LDL, Diet, Reducing, Energy Intake, Female, Lipoprotein(a), Macaca mulatta, Male, Risk Factors, Sex Characteristics
Show Abstract · Added February 24, 2014
Many age-associated pathophysiological changes are retarded by caloric restriction (CR). The present study has investigated the effect of CR on plasma lipoprotein (a) [Lp(a)], an independent risk factor for the age-associated process of atherosclerosis. Rhesus monkeys were fed a control diet (n=19 males, 12 females) or subjected to CR (n=20 males, 11 females fed 30% less calories) for >2 years. All female animals were premenopausal. Plasma Lp(a) levels in control animals were almost two fold higher for males than females (47+/-9 vs 25+/-5mg/dl mean+/-SEM, p=0.05). CR resulted in a reduction in circulating Lp(a) in males to levels similar to those measured in calorie-restricted females, (27+/-5 vs 24+/-4 mg/dl mean+/-SEM). For all animals, plasma Lp(a) was correlated with total cholesterol (r=0.27, p=0.03) and LDL cholesterol (r=0.50, p=0.0001) whether unadjusted or after adjustment for treatment, gender or group. These studies introduce a new mechanism whereby CR may have a beneficial effect on risk factors for the development of atherosclerosis in primates.
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13 MeSH Terms
Re-emergence of fibrates in the management of dyslipidemia and cardiovascular risk.
Linton MF, Fazio S
(2000) Curr Atheroscler Rep 2: 29-35
MeSH Terms: Angiography, Cardiovascular Diseases, Cholesterol, HDL, Cholesterol, LDL, Clinical Trials as Topic, Clofibrate, Drug Interactions, Humans, Hyperlipidemias, Hypolipidemic Agents, Preventive Medicine, Risk Factors, Ultrasonography
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
It is now widely accepted that low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is not the only atherogenic component of the lipid profile and that abnormalities in the metabolism and plasma levels of triglycerides and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) may lead to accelerated growth of atherosclerotic lesions. Fibrates are the drugs of first choice in the management of hypertriglyceridemia, and are also able to substantially raise HDL. The recently published Veterans Administration-High-density Lipoprotein Intervention Trial (VA-HIT) trial showed that fibrate treatment in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD), low HDL, modestly elevated triglycerides, and normal LDL reduces the risk of a recurrent coronary event by 25%. A reasonable approach to the dyslipidemic patient with high CHD risk is to tailor the intervention to the specific lipoprotein abnormality. Under these assumptions fibrate therapy should become widespread, considering that the most common lipid alteration in CHD and patients with diabetes is low HDL and high triglycerides.
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13 MeSH Terms
In vitro oxidation of low-density lipoprotein in two species of nonhuman primates subjected to caloric restriction.
Cefalu WT, Terry JG, Thomas MJ, Morgan TM, Edwards IJ, Rudel LL, Kemnitz JW, Weindruch R
(2000) J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci 55: B355-61
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cholesterol, HDL, Cholesterol, LDL, Energy Intake, Female, In Vitro Techniques, Lipids, Lipoproteins, LDL, Macaca fascicularis, Macaca mulatta, Male, Oxidation-Reduction, Oxidative Stress, Triglycerides, Vitamin E
Show Abstract · Added February 24, 2014
Caloric restriction (CR), which increases longevity and retards age-associated diseases in laboratory rodents, is being evaluated in nonhuman primate trials. CR reduces oxidative stress in rodents and appears to improve risk factors for cardiovascular disease in nonhuman primates. We tested the hypothesis that low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidizability is reduced in two monkey species (rhesus and cynomolgus) subjected to chronic CR. In both species, no significant differences occurred between CR and control animals on total, LDL, or high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol. In rhesus monkeys, triglycerides were higher in controls than CR (139 +/- 23 vs 66 +/- 8 mg/dl,p < .01, respectively). LDL from CR rhesus monkeys was reduced in triglyceride content and molecular weight compared to controls, whereas LDL composition in cynomolgus monkeys was similar in CR and control animals. In keeping with minor deviations in lipids, antioxidants, and LDL composition, no consistent differences in in vitro LDL oxidizability were apparent between CR and controls in either species.
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15 MeSH Terms
A randomized trial comparing the effect of casein with that of soy protein containing varying amounts of isoflavones on plasma concentrations of lipids and lipoproteins.
Crouse JR, Morgan T, Terry JG, Ellis J, Vitolins M, Burke GL
(1999) Arch Intern Med 159: 2070-6
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Caseins, Cholesterol, HDL, Cholesterol, LDL, Double-Blind Method, Female, Humans, Isoflavones, Lipids, Lipoprotein(a), Male, Middle Aged, Soybean Proteins, Triglycerides
Show Abstract · Added February 24, 2014
CONTEXT - Isolated soy protein reduces plasma concentrations of total and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol.
OBJECTIVE - To identify the agent(s) responsible for the cholesterol-lowering effect of soy in mildly hypercholesterolemic volunteers: isoflavones isolated together with soy protein or soy protein itself.
DESIGN - Double-blind randomized parallel trial.
SETTING - Single-center study.
PARTICIPANTS - A total of 156 healthy men and women with LDL cholesterol levels between 3.62 mmol/L (140 mg/dL) and 5.17 mmol/L (200 mg/dL) after instruction in a National Cholesterol Education Program Step I diet and recruited by advertisement from the community.
INTERVENTION - One of 5 daily diets (25 g of casein [for isoflavone-free comparison] or 25 g of isolated soy protein containing 3, 27, 37, or 62 mg of isoflavones).
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES - Change and percent change from baseline in plasma concentrations of triglycerides and total, LDL, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol after 9 weeks.
RESULTS - Compared with casein, isolated soy protein with 62 mg of isoflavones lowered total and LDL cholesterol levels by 4% (P = .04) and 6% (P = .01), respectively. In patients with LDL cholesterol levels in the top half of the population studied (>4.24 mmol/L [>164 mg/dL]), comparable reductions were 9% (P<.001) and 10% (P = 001), respectively; in this group, isolated soy protein with 37 mg of isoflavones reduced total (P = .007) and LDL (P = .02) cholesterol levels by 8%, and there was a dose-response effect of increasing amounts of isoflavones on total and LDL cholesterol levels. Plasma concentrations of triglycerides and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol were unaffected. Ethanol-extracted isolated soy protein containing 3 mg of isoflavones did not significantly reduce plasma concentrations of total or LDL cholesterol.
CONCLUSIONS - Naturally occurring isoflavones isolated with soy protein reduce the plasma concentrations of total and LDL cholesterol without affecting concentrations of triglycerides or high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in mildly hypercholesterolemic volunteers consuming a National Cholesterol Education Program Step I diet. Ethanol-extracted isolated soy protein did not significantly reduce plasma concentrations of total or LDL cholesterol.
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15 MeSH Terms
Lysosomal sequestration of free and esterified cholesterol from oxidized low density lipoprotein in macrophages of different species.
Yancey PG, Jerome WG
(1998) J Lipid Res 39: 1349-61
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cells, Cultured, Cholesterol, Cholesterol Esters, Cholesterol, LDL, Columbidae, Kinetics, Lipoproteins, LDL, Lysosomes, Macrophages, Macrophages, Peritoneal, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred Strains, Monocytes, Species Specificity
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
Macrophage foam cells of atherosclerotic lesions store lipid in lysosomes and cytoplasmic inclusions. Oxidized low density lipoprotein (oxLDL) has been proposed to be the atherogenic particle responsible for the free and esterified cholesterol stores in macrophages. Currently, however, there is a paucity of data showing that oxLDL can induce much cholesterol accumulation in cells. The present studies compare the ability of mildly oxLDL (TBARS = 5 to 10 nmols/mg LDL protein) with acetylated LDL to induce free cholesterol (FC) and esterified cholesterol (EC) accumulation in pigeon, THP-1, and mouse macrophages. Mildly oxLDL stimulated high levels of loading comparable to acLDL where the cellular cholesterol concentrations ranged from 160 to 420 microg/mg cell protein with EC accounting for 52-80% of the cholesterol. Pigeon and THP-1 macrophages stored most (60-90%) of oxLDL cholesterol (both FC and EC) in lysosomes, and the bulk (64-88%) of acLDL cholesterol in cytoplasmic inclusions. Consistent with lysosomal accumulation, cholesterol esterification was 75% less in THP-1 macrophages enriched with oxLDL cholesterol compared with acLDL. Furthermore, addition of an acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase inhibitor did not significantly affect either cholesterol loading or the percent distribution of FC and EC in THP-1 and pigeon cells incubated with oxLDL. Surprisingly, mouse macrophages stored most of oxLDL (71%) and acLDL (83%) cholesterol within cytoplasmic inclusions. Also, in mouse macrophages, esterification paralleled cholesterol loading, and was 3-fold more in oxLDL treated cells compared with acLDL treated cells. Inhibition of ACAT led to a 62% and 90% reduction in the %EC in oxLDL and acLDL treated mouse macrophages, respectively. The results demonstrate that mildly oxidized low density lipoprotein (oxLDL) stimulates macrophage foam cell formation and lipid engorgement of lysosomes. However, the fate of oxLDL cholesterol markedly differs in macrophages of different species.
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16 MeSH Terms
Cholesterol-fed heterozygous Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic rabbits: a new model for atherosclerosis.
Atkinson JB, Hoover RL, Berry KK, Swift LL
(1989) Atherosclerosis 78: 123-36
MeSH Terms: Animals, Aorta, Arteriosclerosis, Cholesterol, Dietary, Cholesterol, HDL, Cholesterol, LDL, Cholesterol, VLDL, Coronary Vessels, Disease Models, Animal, Heterozygote, Hyperlipidemias, Lipids, Microscopy, Electron, Myocardium, Rabbits
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
Homozygous Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic (WHHL) rabbits are used widely to study atherosclerosis, but the WHHL heterozygous rabbit has received little attention. To study their potential as a model for atherosclerosis, heterozygous WHHL and New Zealand white (NZW) rabbits were fed diets containing 0%, 0.5% and 1.0% cholesterol. Plasma lipids were analyzed at 0, 4, 8, 12, 16 and 24 weeks, and animals were killed at 12 and 24 weeks. Plasma cholesterol levels were significantly higher in cholesterol-fed WHHL heterozygotes at 8 weeks compared with NZW rabbits, but no differences were apparent at other times. Atherosclerotic plaques in the aortas of cholesterol-fed WHHL heterozygous rabbits differed from those in NZW rabbits, in that the WHHL had complicated lesions with necrosis, cholesterol clefts, fibrous caps and calcification, similar to that found in humans and homozygous WHHL rabbits. In contrast, NZW rabbits had predominantly foam cell lesions. Heterozygous WHHL rabbits also had less extensive extravascular foam cell deposits. Our results suggest that the cholesterol-fed heterozygous WHHL rabbit may provide a promising model for studying the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis.
0 Communities
1 Members
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15 MeSH Terms
Lovastatin in the treatment of multifactorial hyperlipidemia associated with proteinuria.
Golper TA, Illingworth DR, Morris CD, Bennett WM
(1989) Am J Kidney Dis 13: 312-20
MeSH Terms: Adrenal Cortex Hormones, Adult, Cholesterol, Dietary, Cholesterol, HDL, Cholesterol, LDL, Clinical Trials as Topic, Female, Humans, Hypercholesterolemia, Lovastatin, Male, Middle Aged, Nephrotic Syndrome, Proteinuria, Random Allocation
Show Abstract · Added August 10, 2015
The efficacy and safety of lovastatin as a hypolipidemic agent were evaluated in ten adult patients with secondary hypercholesterolemia due to proteinuria (greater than 2 g/d) and (in seven patients) concurrent corticosteroid therapy. Patients were on a low-cholesterol diet throughout the study. After a 4-week baseline period, patients were randomized to receive either placebo or 10 mg lovastatin twice daily for a period of 6 weeks. The dose of lovastatin was increased to 20 mg twice daily for 6 weeks, and 40 mg twice daily for 6 weeks in the latter group. Those patients who received placebo for the first 6 weeks subsequently received 10, 20, and 40 mg of lovastatin twice daily in a stepped dose regimen, with each dose given for 6 weeks. Lovastatin was well tolerated by all patients and none withdrew from the study. Baseline plasma cholesterol concentrations (390 +/- 20 mg/dL; mean +/- SEM) decreased 22% (P less than 0.003) at the lowest dose of 10 mg twice daily, 27% at 20 mg twice daily, and 33% at 40 mg twice daily. Baseline plasma triglycerides decreased by 25% (P less than 0.05) at the highest dosage. Concentrations of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol fell by 29%, 34%, and 45% on doses of 10, 20, and 40 mg of lovastatin twice daily. Concentrations of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol increased slightly. Serum creatinine concentrations and proteinuria were not affected by lovastatin therapy. We conclude that lovastatin was a well-tolerated and extremely effective hypocholesterolemic agent in patients with persistent secondary hypercholesterolemia associated with proteinuria or proteinuria and concurrent corticosteroid therapy.
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15 MeSH Terms