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Results: 5471 to 5478 of 5478

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A radioimmunometric antibody-binding assay for evaluation of xenoantisera to melanoma-associated antigens.
McCabe RP, Quaranta V, Frugis L, Ferrone S, Reisfeld RA
(1979) J Natl Cancer Inst 62: 455-63
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antibodies, Neoplasm, Antibody Specificity, Antigens, Neoplasm, Cell Line, Cytotoxicity Tests, Immunologic, Humans, Immunoglobulin G, Male, Melanoma, Neoplasms, Experimental, Rabbits, Radioimmunoassay, Staphylococcal Protein A
Show Abstract · Added March 27, 2014
A radioimmunometric antibody-binding assay was developed with the use of 125I-labeled protein A of Staphylococcus aureus (SpA) for the evaluation of xenoantisera to human melanoma-associated antigens. Antisera were produced in New Zealand male albino rabbits by the injection of cultured human melanoma cells or soluble, partially purified melanoma-associated antigens isolated from these cells. Xenoantisera were rendered operationally specific for melanoma-associated antigens by absorption with human red cells and cultured lymphoblasts. The methodologic parameters and the quantitative relationships among xenoantisera, cultured melanoma target cells, and 125I-labeled SpA and their effect on the measurement of xenoantibody binding were critically evaluated. Data indicated the usefulness of the radioimmunometric assay in monitoring the efficacy of absorption and in characterizing the specificity of xenoantisera to melanoma-associated antigens. The radioimmunometric binding assay when modified and used as a binding inhibition assay was effective in the assessment of the serologic activity of soluble melanoma-associated antigens and thus may be used to monitor the progress of antigen purification.
1 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
14 MeSH Terms
Glucagonoma syndrome in a 19-year-old woman.
Riddle MC, Golper TA, Fletcher WS, Ensinck JW, Smith PH
(1978) West J Med 129: 68-72
MeSH Terms: Adenoma, Islet Cell, Adult, Female, Glucagon, Humans, Neoplasm Metastasis, Pancreatic Neoplasms, Skin Manifestations, Syndrome
Added August 10, 2015
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
9 MeSH Terms
Relationship of adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate and guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate to growth of dimethylbenz(a)anthracene-induced mammary tumors in rats.
Matusik RJ, Hilf R
(1976) J Natl Cancer Inst 56: 659-61
MeSH Terms: 9,10-Dimethyl-1,2-benzanthracene, Animals, Castration, Cyclic AMP, Cyclic GMP, Cyclophosphamide, Estrogens, Female, Insulin, Mammary Neoplasms, Experimental, Ovary, Prolactin, Rats
Show Abstract · Added June 11, 2010
Alteration of growth of dimethylbenz[a]anthracene-induced mammary tumors was caused by removal of estrogen (ovariectomy), or insulin (diabetes), or by inhibition of prolactin secretin (treatment with an ergoline derivative). The levels of cyclic AMP (cAMP) and cGMP were measured in carcinomas classified as growing, static, and regressing. The amount of cAMP, expressed as pmoles/mg tumor weight or pmoles/mg protein, was lowest in growing tumors, intermediate in static tumors, and highest in those regressing. No correlation was seen between tumor growth and cGMP levels. Cyclophosphamide-induced tumor stasis did not elevate cAMP levels. The data suggest a role of cAMP in arrest of hormone-induced tumor growth.
1 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
13 MeSH Terms
Membrane glycoprotein differences between normal lactating mammary tissue and the R3230 AC mammary tumor.
Shin BC, Ebner KE, Hudson BG, Carraway KL
(1975) Cancer Res 35: 1135-40
MeSH Terms: Adenosine Triphosphatases, Animals, Cell Fractionation, Cell Membrane, Electrophoresis, Polyacrylamide Gel, Female, Glycoproteins, Lactation, Mammary Glands, Animal, Mammary Neoplasms, Experimental, Neoplasm Transplantation, Nucleotidases, Pregnancy, Rats
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
Membrane glycoproteins have been studied in the normal lactating mammary gland and R3230 AC mammary tumor of the rat. Plasma membrane-enriched fractions were obtained from these tissues by discontinuous sucrose gradient centrifugation of a microsomal preparation from the tissue homogenates. The lightest membrane fractions (F-1 and F-2) have the greatest enrichment of plasma membrane markers, with a 14- to 20-fold purification of 5'-nucleotidase and Na+-K+ -adenosine triphosphatase over the homogenate values in both tumor and normal tissues for F-1. Electron microscopy shows smooth membrane vesicles for these fractions. Polypeptide analysis by acrylamide gel electrophoresis shows essentially the same patterns for F-1 and F-2 and only relatively minor differences between membrane components of tumor and normal tissues. Glycoprotein analysis of the polyacrylamide gels by periodate-Schiff staining indicates more dramatic differences. Membrane Fraction F-1 from normal tissue contains two major glycoproteins, GP-II and GP-III, while Fractions F-2 and F-3 contain an additional glycoprotein, GP-I, with a higher apparent molecular weight. In the tumor, the component corresponding to GP-III is decreased or absent and a new component GP-IV is seen at a lower apparent molecular weight.
1 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
14 MeSH Terms
Comparative studies on highly metabolically active histone acetylation.
Moore M, Jackson V, Sealy L, Chalkley R
(1979) Biochim Biophys Acta 561: 248-60
MeSH Terms: Acetylation, Animals, Cell Cycle, Cell Division, Cell Line, Dactinomycin, Histone Deacetylases, Histones, Liver Neoplasms, Experimental, Mitosis, Neoplasm Proteins, Skin, Tetrahymena pyriformis, Thymus Gland
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
Histone acetate is hydrolyzed rapidly in logarithmically dividing hepatoma tissue culture cells (Jackson, V., Shires, A., Chalkley, R. and Granner, D.K. (1975) J. Biol. Chem. 250, 4856--4863). The phenomenon has been analyzed further in hepatoma tissue culture cells at various stages of the cell cycle, in stationary phase, and in the presence of actinomycin D. We also investigated the phenomenon in Tetrahymena pyriformis macronuclei, bovine thymocytes, and human foreskin fibroblasts. The data suggest that this highly metabolically active histone acetylation while altered in mitotic cells, is independent of the overall rate of cell division, and is only slightly sensitive to actinomycin D. Finally, we conclude that the same general phenomenon is found in both cancerous and normal cells and is apparently common to cells from various stages of the evolutionary scale.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
14 MeSH Terms
Prostaglandins: role in the humoral manifestations of medullary carcinoma of the thyroid and inhibition by somatostatin.
Roberts LJ, Hubbard WC, Bloomgarden ZT, Bertagna XY, McKenna TJ, Rabinowitz D, Oates JA
(1979) Trans Assoc Am Physicians 92: 286-91
MeSH Terms: Adult, Carcinoma, Chronic Disease, Diarrhea, Erythema, Humans, Male, Neoplasm Metastasis, Prostaglandin Antagonists, Prostaglandins, Somatostatin, Thyroid Neoplasms
Added December 10, 2013
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
12 MeSH Terms
Blockade of the flush associated with metastatic gastric carcinoid by combined histamine H1 and H2 receptor antagonists. Evidence for an important role of H2 receptors in human vasculature.
Roberts LJ, Marney SR, Oates JA
(1979) N Engl J Med 300: 236-8
MeSH Terms: Female, Histamine, Histamine H1 Antagonists, Histamine H2 Antagonists, Humans, Hyperemia, Malignant Carcinoid Syndrome, Middle Aged, Neoplasm Metastasis, Receptors, Histamine, Receptors, Histamine H1, Receptors, Histamine H2, Stomach Neoplasms
Added December 10, 2013
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
13 MeSH Terms
Effect of pH on hyperthermic cell survival.
Freeman ML, Dewey WC, Hopwood LE
(1977) J Natl Cancer Inst 58: 1837-9
MeSH Terms: Cell Survival, Cells, Cultured, Hot Temperature, Hydrogen-Ion Concentration, Hyperthermia, Induced, Neoplasms
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
Chinese hamster ovary cells incubated with various concentrations of CO2, to obtain extracellular pH values in the range of 6.40-7.85, were heated at 45.5C for 5, 10, or 20 minutes. Thermal sensitivity increased sharply from pH 7.35 to 6.65 (i.e., survival decreased from 1 X 10(-2) to 3 X 10(-5) for 20 minutes of heating), but remained constant from pH 7.35 to 7.85. The enhanced thermal sensitivity at pH values below pth 7.35 suggested that tumors should be preferentially destroyed by heat relative to normal tissue, since reports indicated that tumors were more acidic than the surrounding normal tissue.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
6 MeSH Terms