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Results: 41 to 47 of 47

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Prospective evaluation and clinical utility of on-site monitoring of coagulation in patients undergoing cardiac operation.
Despotis GJ, Santoro SA, Spitznagel E, Kater KM, Cox JL, Barnes P, Lappas DG
(1994) J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 107: 271-9
MeSH Terms: Blood Coagulation Tests, Blood Transfusion, Cardiac Surgical Procedures, Clinical Protocols, Deamino Arginine Vasopressin, Female, Hemorrhage, Hemostasis, Surgical, Humans, Intraoperative Complications, Male, Microcirculation, Monitoring, Intraoperative, Plasma, Platelet Transfusion, Prospective Studies, Protamines
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
Although laboratory coagulation tests permit a rational approach to both diagnosis and management of coagulation disorders after cardiopulmonary bypass, their clinical utility is limited by delays in obtaining results. This study was designed to evaluate prospectively the impact of on-site coagulation testing on blood product use, operative time, and intraoperative management of microvascular bleeding. Patients who underwent cardiac procedures involving cardiopulmonary bypass and subsequently developed microvascular bleeding were randomly assigned to receive either standard therapy (n = 36) or therapy defined by a treatment algorithm based on results from an on-site coagulation monitoring laboratory (n = 30). No differences were found between treatment groups in hematologic assay data, operative procedures, or duration of cardiopulmonary bypass. Patients treated in accordance with on-site laboratory results (algorithm therapy) received significantly less intraoperative fresh frozen plasma (0.4 +/- 1.1 U versus 2.4 +/- 2.8 U; p = 0.0006) during the treatment interval, had shorter operative times, and had less mediastinal chest tube drainage during the initial perioperative interval (158 +/- 169 ml versus 326 +/- 258 ml; p = 0.003) than did patients in the standard therapy group. Patients who underwent algorithm therapy also received fewer platelet (1.6 +/- 5.9 versus 6.4 +/- 8.2 U; p = 0.02) and red blood cell (1.9 +/- 1.7 U versus 4.1 +/- 4.1 U; p = 0.01) transfusions after the operation. Nine of 36 (25%) standard group patients received initial therapy which differed from that which would have been guided by the on-site algorithm protocol. Our findings indicate that rapid and accurate coagulation test results can guide specific therapy and optimize treatment of microvascular bleeding in patients who undergo cardiac operations.
1 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
17 MeSH Terms
Intravenous immunoglobulin administration: an evaluation of vital sign monitoring.
Camp-Sorrell D, Wujcik D
(1994) Oncol Nurs Forum 21: 531-5
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Bone Marrow Transplantation, Clinical Protocols, Drug Hypersensitivity, Female, Humans, Immunoglobulins, Intravenous, Male, Middle Aged, Monitoring, Physiologic, Nursing Assessment, Nursing Audit, Nursing Evaluation Research, Retrospective Studies, Time Factors, Workload
Show Abstract · Added March 27, 2014
PURPOSE/OBJECTIVES - To determine if adverse reactions to IV immunoglobulin G (IVIG) were being detected by nurses and frequent vital sign monitoring.
DESIGN - Retrospective chart review.
SETTING - Bone marrow transplant (BMT), medical oncology, and pediatric units and the outpatient clinic of a 720-bed hospital in middle Tennessee.
SAMPLE - 62 charts of patients undergoing BMT who had received IVIG. METHODS/MAIN RESEARCH VARIABLES: Charts were reviewed for patient demographics, number and type of IVIG infusion, incidence of adverse reactions, and related information.
FINDINGS - Nine reactions were documented out of 731 separate infusions. Only three reactions could be linked directly to IVIG infusion. Of the nine reactions, only four were detected by nursing personnel during vital sign monitoring.
CONCLUSIONS - Nursing time devoted to frequent vital sign assessment does not seem to be warranted. Protocol for administration and monitoring of IVIG at this institution was changed to reflect these findings.
IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING PRACTICE - Frequent vital sign monitoring is advised for the initial IVIG dose. If no adverse reactions occur, only baseline vital sign monitoring is advised for subsequent infusions. Patients are taught to recognize and report symptoms of adverse reactions.
0 Communities
1 Members
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17 MeSH Terms
Report of the American-European consensus conference on ARDS: definitions, mechanisms, relevant outcomes and clinical trial coordination. The Consensus Committee.
Bernard GR, Artigas A, Brigham KL, Carlet J, Falke K, Hudson L, Lamy M, LeGall JR, Morris A, Spragg R
(1994) Intensive Care Med 20: 225-32
MeSH Terms: Clinical Protocols, Clinical Trials as Topic, Europe, Forecasting, Goals, Health Care Costs, Humans, Incidence, Morbidity, Prevalence, Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult, Risk Factors, Treatment Outcome, United States
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), a process of non-hydrostatic pulmonary edema and hypoxemia associated with a variety of etiologies carries a high morbidity, mortality (10-90%) and financial cost. The reported annual incidence in the United States is 150,000 cases, but this figure has been challenged and may be different in Europe. Part of the reason for these uncertainties is the heterogeneity of diseases underlying ARDS and the lack of uniform definitions for ARDS. Thus, those whose wish to know the true incidence and outcome on this clinical syndrome are stymied. The European American Consensus Committee on ARDS was formed to focus on these issues and on the pathophysiologic mechanisms of the process. It was felt that international coordination between North America and Europe in clinical studies of ARDS was becoming increasingly important in order to address the recent plethora of potential therapeutic agents for the prevention and treatment of ARDS.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
14 MeSH Terms
The American-European Consensus Conference on ARDS. Definitions, mechanisms, relevant outcomes, and clinical trial coordination.
Bernard GR, Artigas A, Brigham KL, Carlet J, Falke K, Hudson L, Lamy M, Legall JR, Morris A, Spragg R
(1994) Am J Respir Crit Care Med 149: 818-24
MeSH Terms: Americas, Clinical Protocols, Clinical Trials as Topic, Europe, Humans, Incidence, Oxygen Inhalation Therapy, Prevalence, Prognosis, Radiography, Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult, Risk Factors
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), a process of nonhydrostatic pulmonary edema and hypoxemia associated with a variety of etiologies, carries a high morbidity, mortality (10 to 90%), and financial cost. The reported annual incidence in the United States is 150,000 cases, but this figure has been challenged, and it may be different in Europe. Part of the reason for these uncertainties are the heterogeneity of diseases underlying ARDS and the lack of uniform definitions for ARDS. Thus, those who wish to know the true incidence and outcome of this clinical syndrome are stymied. The American-European Consensus Committee on ARDS was formed to focus on these issues and on the pathophysiologic mechanisms of the process. It was felt that international coordination between North America and Europe in clinical studies of ARDS was becoming increasingly important in order to address the recent plethora of potential therapeutic agents for the prevention and treatment of ARDS.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
12 MeSH Terms
Clinical judgment and therapeutic decision making.
Hlatky MA, Califf RM, Harrell FE, Lee KL, Mark DB, Muhlbaier LH, Pryor DB
(1990) J Am Coll Cardiol 15: 1-14
MeSH Terms: Cardiology, Cardiovascular Diseases, Clinical Protocols, Decision Making, Humans, Information Systems, Meta-Analysis as Topic, Prognosis, Proportional Hazards Models, Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic, Research Design
Show Abstract · Added February 28, 2014
Clinical decision making is under increased scrutiny due to concerns about the cost and quality of medical care. Variability in physician decision making is common, in part because of deficiencies in the knowledge base, but also due to the difference in physicians' approaches to clinical problem solving. Evaluation of patient prognosis is a critical factor in the selection of therapy, and careful attention to methodology is essential to provide reliable information. Randomized controlled clinical trials provide the most solid basis for the establishment of broad therapeutic principles. Because randomized studies cannot be performed to address every question, observational studies will continue to play a complementary role in the evaluation of therapy. Randomized studies in progress, meta analyses of existing data, and increased use of administrative and collaborative clinical data bases will improve the knowledge base for decision making in the future.
0 Communities
1 Members
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11 MeSH Terms
Estimating the likelihood of severe coronary artery disease.
Pryor DB, Shaw L, Harrell FE, Lee KL, Hlatky MA, Mark DB, Muhlbaier LH, Califf RM
(1991) Am J Med 90: 553-62
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Clinical Protocols, Coronary Disease, Electrocardiography, Evaluation Studies as Topic, Female, Humans, Likelihood Functions, Male, Medical History Taking, Middle Aged, Physical Examination, Predictive Value of Tests, Prevalence, Radiography, Thoracic, Reproducibility of Results, Risk Factors
Show Abstract · Added February 28, 2014
PURPOSE - To determine which clinical characteristics obtained by a physician during an initial clinical examination are important for estimating the likelihood of severe coronary artery disease, and to determine whether estimates based on these characteristics remain valid when applied prospectively and in different patient groups.
PATIENTS AND METHODS - We examined clinical characteristics predictive of severe disease in 6,435 consecutive symptomatic patients referred for suspected coronary artery disease between 1969 and 1983.
RESULTS - Eleven of 23 characteristics were important for estimating the likelihood of severe coronary artery disease. A model using these characteristics accurately estimated the likelihood of severe disease in an independent sample of 2,342 patients referred since 1983. The model also accurately estimated the prevalence of severe disease in large series of patients reported in the literature.
CONCLUSIONS - These findings suggest that the clinician's initial evaluation can identify patients at high or low risk of anatomically severe coronary artery disease. Cost-conscious quality care is encouraged by identifying patients at higher risk for severe coronary artery disease who are most likely to benefit from further evaluation.
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18 MeSH Terms
High risk of human papillomavirus infection and cervical squamous intraepithelial lesions among women with symptomatic human immunodeficiency virus infection.
Vermund SH, Kelley KF, Klein RS, Feingold AR, Schreiber K, Munk G, Burk RD
(1991) Am J Obstet Gynecol 165: 392-400
MeSH Terms: Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome, Adult, Blotting, Southern, Carcinoma, Squamous Cell, Cervix Uteri, Clinical Protocols, Female, HIV Seropositivity, Humans, Middle Aged, Odds Ratio, Papillomaviridae, Risk, Tumor Virus Infections, Uterine Cervical Neoplasms, Zidovudine
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
We investigated the relationship of human papillomavirus (by cervicovaginal lavage and Southern blot), human immunodeficiency virus, and squamous intraepithelial lesions in 96 high-risk women in the Bronx, New York. Antibodies for human immunodeficiency virus were detected in 51 (53%) women. Of the 33 women with symptomatic human immunodeficiency virus infection, 23 (70%) had human papillomavirus infection compared with 4 of 18 (22%) asymptomatic women who were human immunodeficiency virus seropositive and 10 of 45 (22%) uninfected women (p less than 0.0001). The rate of squamous intraepithelial lesions was 52% (14 of 27) for women with both viruses detected, 18% (6 of 34) for women with either virus detected, and 9% (3 of 35) for uninfected women. Among symptomatic human immunodeficiency virus-infected women, a strong association between human papillomavirus infection and squamous intraepithelial lesions was demonstrated (odds ratio, 12; 95% confidence interval, 1.3 to 108). Risk was highest for younger women from ethnic or racial minority groups. Advanced human immunodeficiency virus-related disease, with its associated immunosuppression, seems to exacerbate human papillomavirus-mediated cervical cytologic abnormalities. Public health measures are needed to provide Papanicolaou smear screening and appropriate clinical follow-up and treatment for women at high risk for human immunodeficiency virus infection.
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16 MeSH Terms