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Interaction of exercise and insulin action in humans.
Wasserman DH, Geer RJ, Rice DE, Bracy D, Flakoll PJ, Brown LL, Hill JO, Abumrad NN
(1991) Am J Physiol 260: E37-45
MeSH Terms: Adult, Amino Acids, Blood Glucose, Carbohydrate Metabolism, Epinephrine, Exercise, Fatty Acids, Nonesterified, Glucose, Glucose Clamp Technique, Glycerol, Humans, Insulin, Insulin Infusion Systems, Lactates, Male, Norepinephrine, Physical Exertion, Reference Values
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
To assess the interaction of exercise and insulin action, healthy males were studied with saline infusion (n = 5) or with a hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp (0.5, 1.0, 2.0, or 15.0 mU.kg-1.min-1; n = 5 at each dose) during rest (40 min), moderate-intensity cycle exercise (100 min), and recovery (100 min). Metabolism was assessed using isotopic methods and indirect calorimetry. During rest, exercise, and recovery with saline infusion, plasma glucose was unchanged, total glucose utilization (Rd) was 2.4 +/- 0.4, 4.9 +/- 0.2, and 2.6 +/- 0.2 mg.kg-1.min-1, and carbohydrate (CHO) oxidation (OX) was 1.4 +/- 0.3, 10.6 +/- 1.1, and 0.5 +/- 0.2 mg.kg-1.min-1. The glucose infusion, insulin-dependent Rd, and CHO OX increased synergistically when exercise and insulin clamps were combined. Exercise decreased (P less than 0.05) the half-maximal doses (ED50) and increased the maximal responses (Vmax) for insulin-dependent Rd and CHO OX. Estimates of insulin-independent Rd were 1.3 +/- 0.7, 4.1 +/- 1.3, and 1.9 +/- 0.7 mg.kg-1.min-1 and insulin-independent CHO OX were 1.2 +/- 0.9, 10.4 +/- 1.3, and 0.6 +/- 0.3 mg.kg-1.min-1 during rest, exercise, and recovery. Estimates during exercise were greater than those at rest (P less than 0.05). The total suppression of free fatty acids (FFA) and fat OX by insulin were elevated by exercise (P less than 0.05). In summary, exercise and insulin interact synergistically in stimulating Rd and CHO OX.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
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18 MeSH Terms
Deletion within the CYP17 gene together with insertion of foreign DNA is the cause of combined complete 17 alpha-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase deficiency in an Italian patient.
Biason A, Mantero F, Scaroni C, Simpson ER, Waterman MR
(1991) Mol Endocrinol 5: 2037-45
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adrenal Hyperplasia, Congenital, Aldehyde-Lyases, Base Sequence, Blotting, Southern, Chromosome Deletion, Cytochrome P-450 Enzyme System, DNA, DNA Transposable Elements, Exons, Humans, Introns, Italy, Male, Metabolism, Inborn Errors, Molecular Sequence Data, Mutation, Polymerase Chain Reaction, Steroid 17-alpha-Hydroxylase, Syndrome
Show Abstract · Added February 12, 2015
The molecular basis of 17 alpha-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase deficiency syndrome in a 14-yr-old 46,XY Italian patient was investigated by amplification, subcloning, and sequencing of specific exonic sequences from genomic DNA samples. A homozygous mutation, consisting of a 518-basepair (bp) deletion combined with a 469-bp insertion, was identified in the CYP17 gene of the patient. The deletion spans much of exon II, the whole intron 2, and a portion of exon III. A part (156 bp) of the inserted sequence shows 95.5% identity to the nuclear antigen-binding site on Marek disease virus DNA and sequences found in rearranged mitochondrial DNA of rat hepatoma cells. A similar degree of sequence identity (99%) was also found between the above sequences and part of the lac operon of E. coli. The inserted sequence is lacking the BamHI site in intron 2 of CYP17 and contains an in-frame stop codon (TAA). Thus, the mutated gene encodes a truncated nonfunctional steroid hydroxylase, giving rise to symptoms associated with complete combined 17 alpha-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase deficiency. The family history revealed that the patient is the child of a consanguineous marriage and has two genotypically and phenotypically female sisters also suffering from symptoms of the disease. Investigation of genomic DNA from these sisters revealed that in each case both CYP17 alleles contained the same mutation. On the other hand, the parents were found to be heterozygous for this mutation. The insertion could not be found in DNA from normal individuals or in the CYP17 gene of other Italian patients with the 17 alpha-hydroxylase deficiency syndrome.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
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20 MeSH Terms
Relationship between aerobic fitness level and daily energy expenditure in weight-stable humans.
Sharp TA, Reed GW, Sun M, Abumrad NN, Hill JO
(1992) Am J Physiol 263: E121-8
MeSH Terms: Aerobiosis, Body Composition, Body Temperature, Body Weight, Calorimetry, Indirect, Cross-Sectional Studies, Eating, Energy Metabolism, Female, Humans, Male, Oxygen Consumption, Physical Fitness, Rest, Retrospective Studies
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
The relationship between exercise and energy expenditure is unclear, with some suggestions that exercise leads to increased energy expenditure over and beyond the increase due to the exercise itself. In this cross-sectional study, we examined the relationships among aerobic fitness level, body composition, and total daily energy expenditure in 78 subjects. Daily energy expenditure (determined in a whole room calorimeter) was significantly correlated with both fat-free mass (FFM) and aerobic fitness (estimated from maximum aerobic capacity or VO2max). However, multiple-regression analysis demonstrated that, after accounting for FFM, VO2max did not explain a significant amount of the remaining variation in energy expenditure. In addition, the relationship between resting metabolic rate and both FFM and VO2max was evaluated using data from 214 weight-stable subjects analyzed retrospectively. The results were identical with the results obtained from the 78 subjects in that VO2max did not have effects independent of FFM on energy expenditure. We conclude that aerobic fitness does not have a direct effect on energy expenditure. However, it may have effects that are mediated through body composition, since in both populations studied here, VO2max was positively correlated with FFM and negatively correlated with adiposity.
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15 MeSH Terms
Short-term effects of dietary-fat ingestion on energy expenditure and nutrient balance.
Bennett C, Reed GW, Peters JC, Abumrad NN, Sun M, Hill JO
(1992) Am J Clin Nutr 55: 1071-7
MeSH Terms: Adult, Basal Metabolism, Calorimetry, Dietary Carbohydrates, Dietary Fats, Dietary Proteins, Energy Metabolism, Humans, Lipid Metabolism, Male, Middle Aged, Oxidation-Reduction, Oxygen Consumption, Physical Fitness
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
Joule for joule, dietary fat may promote obesity more than protein or carbohydrate. In this study we determined whether the addition of 50 g dietary fat to a standard breakfast would increase energy expenditure or fat oxidation during the immediate 6-h postprandial period or over the ensuing 18 h. We also determined whether subjects with a high level of aerobic physical fitness would show a greater increase in fat oxidation after the ingestion of the extra fat than would less fit subjects. Adding fat did not increase fat oxidation or energy expenditure either during the immediate 6-h postprandial period or over the following 18 h. This was true regardless of the subject's fitness level. Acutely, dietary fat ingested in excess of its usual rate of oxidation appears to be stored in the body. Being physically fit does not appear to provide an advantage in avoiding short-term storage of excess dietary fat.
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14 MeSH Terms
Lactic acidosis: effect of treatment on intracellular pH and energetics in living rat heart.
Zahler R, Barrett E, Majumdar S, Greene R, Gore JC
(1992) Am J Physiol 262: H1572-8
MeSH Terms: Acidosis, Lactic, Animals, Bicarbonates, Energy Metabolism, Hemodynamics, Hydrogen, Hydrogen-Ion Concentration, Intracellular Membranes, Lactates, Lactic Acid, Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, Male, Myocardium, Phosphates, Rats, Rats, Inbred Strains
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
Systemic acidemia may impair cardiac contractility and predispose to arrhythmias. Moreover, bicarbonate treatment may further depress cardiac performance and increase mortality. Whether changes in myocardial intracellular pH or energy metabolism underlie this diminished performance has not been clarified in the in vivo setting. Thus we investigated the effect of lactic acidosis and two proposed treatments on myocardial energetics and intracellular pH in anesthetized living rats. A previously validated 31P-labeled nuclear magnetic resonance (31P-NMR) spectroscopic technique using saturating pulses was used to follow myocardial intracellular pH, phosphocreatine (PCr), ATP, and inorganic phosphate (Pi). After obtaining baseline values, we infused lactic acid to achieve a level greater than 5 mM. We then added an infusion of either bicarbonate (n = 7) or saline (n = 5). During lactic acid infusion, arterial pH declined (from 7.27 to 7.07, P less than 0.0001), but myocardial intracellular pH did not change (7.13 vs. 7.07, P not significant). The ratio of PCr to Pi, however, decreased with acidemia (from 3.13 to 2.24, P = 0.004), suggesting impaired energy metabolism. Compared with saline, bicarbonate infusion restored systemic pH (from 7.08 to 7.29), but myocardial pH was unaltered. In addition, PCr/Pi declined further following bicarbonate treatment (1.41 vs. 2.42, P = 0.08) but not following saline. Thus, despite reversal of systemic acidemia, bicarbonate treatment was associated with more severe impairment of energy metabolism than saline. This suggests a mechanism for previously reported adverse cardiac effects of bicarbonate treatment.
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16 MeSH Terms
Nutrient balance and energy expenditure during ad libitum feeding of high-fat and high-carbohydrate diets in humans.
Thomas CD, Peters JC, Reed GW, Abumrad NN, Sun M, Hill JO
(1992) Am J Clin Nutr 55: 934-42
MeSH Terms: Adult, Body Composition, Body Weight, Calorimetry, Dietary Carbohydrates, Dietary Fats, Dietary Proteins, Eating, Energy Intake, Energy Metabolism, Female, Humans, Male, Obesity, Oxidation-Reduction, Random Allocation, Regression Analysis
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
To study the influence of diet composition on regulation of body weight, we fed 21 weight-stable subjects (11 lean, 10 obese) high-carbohydrate (HC) and high-fat (HF) diets for 1 wk each. Although diet composition was fixed, total energy intake was unrestricted. Subjects had a higher energy intake on the HF (11,039 +/- 2700 kJ/d) than on the HC (10,672 +/- 2617 kJ/d) diet (P less than 0.05), but energy expenditure was not different between diets. On day 7 of the HC diet, carbohydrate (CHO) oxidation was significantly related to CHO intake with the slope of the regression line 0.99, suggesting that overall CHO balance was near zero. However, the slope of the regression line was greater for obese than for lean subjects. On day 7 of the HF diet, fat oxidation was significantly related to fat intake but the slope of the line was 0.50, suggesting that overall fat balance was positive. However, this relationship was due entirely to lean subjects, with obese subjects showing no relationship between fat intake and oxidation.
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17 MeSH Terms
Short-term regulation of insulin-mediated glucose utilization in four-day fasted human volunteers: role of amino acid availability.
Flakoll PJ, Wentzel LS, Rice DE, Hill JO, Abumrad NN
(1992) Diabetologia 35: 357-66
MeSH Terms: Adult, Amino Acids, Analysis of Variance, Biological Availability, Blood Glucose, Energy Metabolism, Fasting, Fatty Acids, Nonesterified, Glucagon, Glucose, Homeostasis, Humans, Insulin, Kinetics, Male, Reference Values
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
Glucose homeostasis in men fasted for 84 h was assessed using isotopes, indirect calorimetry and forearm balance techniques during a basal period and three sequential hyperinsulinaemic euglycaemic clamps each lasting for 150 min. Two protocols (n = 12 in each) were used: subjects were either allowed to develop hypoaminoacidaemia or received a commercial solution of L-amino acids while maintaining near-basal plasma leucine levels. Insulin infusions resulted in 3-, 35- and 650-fold increases in plasma insulin levels in both protocols. The infusion of amino acids produced a rightward shift in the dose-response curve of insulin's effect on suppressing hepatic glucose production, indicating decreased sensitivity in addition to blunting of the maximal responsiveness. Total body glucose rate of disappearance was progressively increased with escalating insulin doses, but was 22% lower at the intermediate and highest insulin doses in the group that was infused with amino acids (3.44 +/- 0.53 vs 4.82 +/- 0.71 and 7.72 +/- 1.01 vs 10.36 +/- 1.08 mg.kg-1.min-1, respectively; p less than 0.05). Forearm balance data confirmed the isotopic data, since amino acid infusions blunted the insulin-mediated increase in net forearm glucose utilization (by 50-83%). Furthermore, the infusion of amino acids resulted in marked reductions in the rate of carbohydrate oxidation and storage as assessed by indirect calorimetry. The data indicate that the amino acid-mediated suppression of glucose utilization and carbohydrate oxidation is exerted on the responsive component of insulin action.
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16 MeSH Terms
Metabolic regulation in peripheral tissues and transition to increased gluconeogenic mode during prolonged exercise.
Wasserman DH, Lacy DB, Bracy D, Williams PE
(1992) Am J Physiol 263: E345-54
MeSH Terms: Amino Acids, Animals, Arteries, Biological Availability, Blood Glucose, Carbon Dioxide, Dogs, Fatty Acids, Nonesterified, Glucose, Hindlimb, Lactates, Lactic Acid, Lipid Metabolism, Liver, Oxygen, Physical Exertion, Pyruvates, Time Factors
Show Abstract · Added August 19, 2014
To assess the means by which peripheral metabolism facilitates the transition to a gluconeogenic state, dogs were studied during 150 min of moderate treadmill exercise. Metabolism in the working hindlimb was assessed with arteriovenous difference and isotopic techniques (n = 9). In a separate group (n = 6), hepatic metabolism was assessed using arteriovenous differences. Limb glucose uptake (LGU) and oxidation (GOX) rose from 33 +/- 10 and 5 +/- 2 to 101 +/- 20 and 54 +/- 15 mumol/min at 10 min of exercise. LGU continued to rise (151 +/- 21 mumol/min at 150 min), while GOX declined. Nonoxidative glucose metabolism (GNOX) was 28 +/- 10 mumol/min at rest and 47 +/- 24 and 108 +/- 16 mumol/min at 10 and 150 min of exercise. Limb nonglycemic (predominantly glycogen) pyruvate formation rose from 52 +/- 22 to 198 +/- 54 and 242 +/- 74 mumol/min at 10 and 150 min of exercise. The gradual increase in GNOX and the high glycogenolytic rate were paralleled by accelerated lactate, pyruvate, and glutamine releases. Limb glycerol release rose promptly and remained elevated during exercise. Plasma nonesterified fatty acids (NEFAs) rose gradually and paralleled the gradual rise in GNOX (r = 0.93). The resulting rise in hepatic NEFA delivery was highly correlated to hepatic O2 uptake (r = 0.87), hepatic vein lactate-to-pyruvate ratio (r = 0.90), and intrahepatic gluconeogenic efficiency (r = 0.96). In summary, during exercise, 1) the primary fate of the added glucose consumed by the working limb is initially oxidation, but becomes GNOX as exercise duration progresses; 2) glycogenolysis rises promptly, but attains its highest rate at the end of exercise; 3) the late increases in GNOX and glycogenolysis relate to an increased gluconeogenic precursor release from the working limb; 4) although lipolysis increases promptly and is sustained, circulating NEFAs rise only gradually; and 5) the gradual rise in plasma NEFAs is highly correlated to the shift from GOX to GNOX and the adjustments in hepatic metabolism that are necessary for the full gluconeogenic response.
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18 MeSH Terms
The effects of acute elevations in plasma cortisol levels on alanine metabolism in the conscious dog.
Goldstein RE, Reed GW, Wasserman DH, Williams PE, Lacy DB, Buckspan R, Abumrad NN, Cherrington AD
(1992) Metabolism 41: 1295-303
MeSH Terms: 3-Hydroxybutyric Acid, Alanine, Animals, Blood Glucose, Carbohydrate Metabolism, Carbon Radioisotopes, Consciousness, Dogs, Epinephrine, Female, Glucagon, Gluconeogenesis, Glucose, Glycerol, Hydrocortisone, Hydroxybutyrates, Insulin, Lactates, Liver, Male, Norepinephrine, Time Factors
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
The present study was undertaken to determine whether an acute physiological increase in plasma cortisol level had significant effects on alanine metabolism and gluconeogenesis within 3 hours in conscious, overnight-fasted dogs. Each experiment consisted of an 80-minute tracer and dye equilibration period, a 40-minute basal period, and a 3-hour experimental period. A primed, continuous infusion of [3-3H]glucose and continuous infusions of [U-14C]alanine and indocyanine green dye were initiated at the start of the equilibration period and continued throughout the experiment. Dogs were studied with (1) a hydrocortisone infusion ([CORT] 3.0 micrograms.kg-1.min-1, n = 5), (2) hydrocortisone infused as in CORT, but with pancreatic hormones clamped using somatostatin and basal intraportal replacement of insulin and glucagon (CLAMP+CORT, n = 5), or (3) saline infusion during a pancreatic clamp (CLAMP, n = 5). Glucose production and gluconeogenesis were determined using tracer and arteriovenous difference techniques. During CLAMP, all parameters were stable except for a modest 67% +/- 6% increase in gluconeogenic conversion of alanine to glucose and a 53% +/- 26% increase in gluconeogenic efficiency. When plasma cortisol levels were increased fourfold during CLAMP+CORT, there was no change in the concentration, production, or clearance of glucose. Gluconeogenic conversion of alanine to glucose increased 10% +/- 34% and gluconeogenic efficiency increased 65% +/- 43%, while net hepatic alanine uptake (NHAU) increased 60% +/- 19% and hepatic fractional extraction of alanine increased 38% +/- 12%. Cortisol did not cause an increase in the arterial glycerol level or net hepatic glycerol uptake.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
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22 MeSH Terms
The effect of poisoning with Dithane M-45 on oxygen uptake and energy balance in adult rats.
Gawecki J, Urbanowicz M, Buchowski M, Borowicz T
(1976) Acta Physiol Pol 27: 169-74
MeSH Terms: Animals, Body Weight, Calorimetry, Depression, Chemical, Energy Metabolism, Female, Intestinal Absorption, Maneb, Oxygen Consumption, Rats, Thiocarbamates, Thyroid Gland, Time Factors, Zineb
Show Abstract · Added July 31, 2015
Adult white rats were kept on natural diet containing various doses of Dithane M-45 (Mn and Zn ethylene-bisdithiocarbamate). Oxygen uptake (VO2), metabolic rate and energy balance were determined at intervals of several days. Oxygen uptake and metabolic rate were not significantly changed in animals receiving Dithane M-45 in concentrations of 5 and 50 ppm but they were significantly decreased in the animals kept on the diet containing the preparation in concentrations of 500, 2000 and 5000 ppm. The authors conclude that changes in body weight of animals after poisoning with Dithane M-45 are due, both to reduced supply and requirements for energy.
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14 MeSH Terms