Other search tools

About this data

The publication data currently available has been vetted by Vanderbilt faculty, staff, administrators and trainees. The data itself is retrieved directly from NCBI's PubMed and is automatically updated on a weekly basis to ensure accuracy and completeness.

If you have any questions or comments, please contact us.

Results: 31 to 39 of 39

Publication Record

Connections

A methodological issue in the analysis of second-primary cancer incidence in long-term survivors of childhood cancers.
Yasui Y, Liu Y, Neglia JP, Friedman DL, Bhatia S, Meadows AT, Diller LR, Mertens AC, Whitton J, Robison LL
(2003) Am J Epidemiol 158: 1108-13
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Age Distribution, Aged, Breast Neoplasms, Child, Child, Preschool, Female, Humans, Incidence, Middle Aged, Neoplasms, Second Primary, Proportional Hazards Models, SEER Program, United States
Show Abstract · Added March 27, 2014
Survival of childhood cancer patients has increased remarkably in the last several decades due to therapeutic improvements. Associated with this progress is the emerging need to accurately assess/minimize late effects of cancer therapy in long-term survivors. This paper considers a methodological issue in assessing the risk of second-primary malignant neoplasms, a major late effect of concern, using second-primary female breast cancer as an example. In the assessment of second-primary malignant neoplasm risk, attained age is a critical factor that must be taken into account. Even with follow-up of decades, childhood-cancer survivors are still at relatively young ages for developing adult-onset diseases. Attained ages at follow-up, however, modify cancer risk considerably; for example, in the general population, women aged 40 years have about fivefold increased breast cancer risk compared with women aged 30 years. A failure to account for the natural age-associated increase of risk could alter, or even reverse, analytical conclusions. This problem was studied empirically by both descriptive and regression analyses of two major studies of long-term childhood-cancer survivors, the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (1975-1999) and the Late Effects Study Group (1955-1994). These showed appreciable differences in the analytical results by not accounting for the natural age-associated increase of risk, illustrating a significant impact of this methodological issue on study conclusions.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
15 MeSH Terms
The risk of second primary tumors after resection of stage I nonsmall cell lung cancer.
Rice D, Kim HW, Sabichi A, Lippman S, Lee JJ, Williams B, Vaporciyan A, Smythe WR, Swisher S, Walsh G, Putnam JB, Hong WK, Roth J
(2003) Ann Thorac Surg 76: 1001-7; discussion 1007-8
MeSH Terms: Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung, Female, Humans, Isotretinoin, Lung Neoplasms, Male, Middle Aged, Neoplasm Staging, Neoplasms, Second Primary, Prospective Studies
Show Abstract · Added March 27, 2014
BACKGROUND - The incidence of second primary lung cancers (SPLC) after resection of nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is estimated to be 1% to 4% per patient year. The overall effect of SPLC on survival after resection of stage I NSCLC is unknown. Here we report the incidence, management, and outcome of SPLC in a large prospective cohort of patients who underwent careful follow-up.
METHODS - National Cancer Institute Intergroup Trial NCI #I91-0001 examined the effectiveness of isotretinoin A for chemoprevention of second primary tumors, the primary endpoint in that trial. Prospective data from patients randomly assigned to the placebo arm were analyzed.
RESULTS - Five hundred sixty-nine patients underwent complete resection of pathologic stage I NSCLC. The median follow-up was 5.9 years. Second primary tumors developed in 88 (15%) patients. Of these, 49 (56%) were SPLC (incidence = 1.99/100 patient-years), with a median interval from initial surgery of 4.2 years. Second primary lung cancer never developed in patients who had never smoked (n = 44, p = 0.046; never versus ever smokers). Current smokers had a higher incidence of SPLC than former smokers (hazard ratio = 1.91, p = 0.03). Age, sex, stage, histology, tumor location and initial surgery had no effect on SPLC development. Despite semiannual follow-up with chest radiographs, 12 (24%) patients had metastatic disease at the time of diagnosis of SPLC. Surgical resection was performed in 31 (63%) SPLC patients. Median survival was 4.1 years in those who underwent surgery and 1.4 years in those who did not (p = 0.003). Overall SPLC-related mortality in the original cohort was 3.7%.
CONCLUSIONS - Patients who undergo surgery for SPLC can achieve prolonged survival. Despite close follow-up however many patients with SPLC present with advanced disease. That indicates a need for continued lifelong postoperative surveillance.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
10 MeSH Terms
Near-precise interchromosomal recombination and functional DNA topoisomerase II cleavage sites at MLL and AF-4 genomic breakpoints in treatment-related acute lymphoblastic leukemia with t(4;11) translocation.
Lovett BD, Lo Nigro L, Rappaport EF, Blair IA, Osheroff N, Zheng N, Megonigal MD, Williams WR, Nowell PC, Felix CA
(2001) Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 98: 9802-7
MeSH Terms: Antigens, Neoplasm, Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols, Catechols, Child, Chromosome Breakage, Chromosomes, Human, Pair 11, Chromosomes, Human, Pair 4, Combined Modality Therapy, Cyclophosphamide, DNA Topoisomerases, Type II, DNA, Neoplasm, DNA-Binding Proteins, Dactinomycin, Etoposide, Female, Histone-Lysine N-Methyltransferase, Humans, Ifosfamide, Isoenzymes, Models, Genetic, Molecular Sequence Data, Myeloid-Lymphoid Leukemia Protein, Neoplasm Proteins, Neoplasms, Second Primary, Nuclear Proteins, Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma, Proto-Oncogenes, Radiotherapy, Adjuvant, Recombination, Genetic, Rhabdomyosarcoma, Alveolar, Soft Tissue Neoplasms, Transcription Factors, Transcriptional Elongation Factors, Translocation, Genetic, Vincristine
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
We analyzed the der(11) and der(4) genomic breakpoint junctions of a t(4;11) in the leukemia of a patient previously administered etoposide and dactinomycin by molecular and biochemical approaches to gain insights about the translocation mechanism and the relevant drug exposure. The genomic breakpoint junctions were amplified by PCR. Cleavage of DNA substrates containing the normal homologues of the MLL and AF-4 translocation breakpoints was examined in vitro upon incubation with human DNA topoisomerase IIalpha and etoposide, etoposide catechol, etoposide quinone, or dactinomycin. The der(11) and der(4) genomic breakpoint junctions both involved MLL intron 6 and AF-4 intron 3. Recombination was precise at the sequence level except for the overall gain of a single templated nucleotide. The translocation breakpoints in MLL and AF-4 were DNA topoisomerase II cleavage sites. Etoposide and its metabolites, but not dactinomycin, enhanced cleavage at these sites. Assuming that DNA topoisomerase II was the mediator of the breakage, processing of the staggered nicks induced by DNA topoisomerase II, including exonucleolytic deletion and template-directed polymerization, would have been required before ligation of the ends to generate the observed genomic breakpoint junctions. These data are inconsistent with a translocation mechanism involving interchromosomal recombination by simple exchange of DNA topoisomerase II subunits and DNA-strand transfer; however, consistent with reciprocal DNA topoisomerase II cleavage events in MLL and AF-4 in which both breaks became stable, the DNA ends were processed and underwent ligation. Etoposide and/or its metabolites, but not dactinomycin, likely were the relevant exposures in this patient.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
35 MeSH Terms
Second malignant neoplasms in five-year survivors of childhood cancer: childhood cancer survivor study.
Neglia JP, Friedman DL, Yasui Y, Mertens AC, Hammond S, Stovall M, Donaldson SS, Meadows AT, Robison LL
(2001) J Natl Cancer Inst 93: 618-29
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Child, Cohort Studies, Female, Humans, Incidence, Male, Middle Aged, Multivariate Analysis, Neoplasms, Second Primary, Retrospective Studies, Risk Factors
Show Abstract · Added March 27, 2014
BACKGROUND - Because survival rates among childhood cancer patients are increasing, assessing the risk of second and subsequent malignant neoplasms (SMNs) is ever more important. Using the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study cohort, we identified the risk of SMNS:
METHODS - A retrospective cohort of 13 581 children diagnosed with common cancers before age 21 years and surviving at least 5 years was constructed with the use of data from patients treated at 25 U.S. and Canadian institutions. SMNs were ascertained through self-administered questionnaires and verified by pathology reports. Information on therapeutic exposures was abstracted from medical records. The risk of SMN was evaluated by standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) and excess absolute risk. Poisson multiple regression models were used to assess the impact of host and therapy factors on the risk of developing SMNS: All statistical tests were two-sided.
RESULTS - In 298 individuals, 314 SMNs were identified (SIR = 6.38; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 5.69 to 7.13). The largest observed excess SMNs were bone and breast cancers (SIR = 19.14 [95% CI = 12.72 to 27.67] and SIR = 16.18 [95% CI = 12.35 to 20.83], respectively). A statistically significant excess of SMNs followed all childhood cancers. In multivariate regression models adjusted for therapeutic radiation exposure, SMNs of any type were independently associated with female sex (P<.001), childhood cancer at a younger age (P for trend <.001), childhood Hodgkin's disease or soft-tissue sarcoma (P<.001 and P =.01, respectively), and exposure to alkylating agents (P for trend =.02). Twenty years after the childhood cancer diagnosis, the cumulative estimated SMN incidence was 3.2%. However, only 1.88 excess malignancies occurred per 1000 years of patient follow-up.
CONCLUSIONS - Success in treating children with cancer should not be overshadowed by the incidence of SMNS: However, patients and health-care providers must be aware of risk factors for SMNs so that surveillance is focused and early prevention strategies are implemented.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
13 MeSH Terms
Surgical resection of non-small cell carcinoma after treatment for small cell carcinoma.
Smythe WR, Estrera AL, Swisher SG, Merriman KW, Walsh GL, Putnam JB, Vaporciyan AA, Roth JA
(2001) Ann Thorac Surg 71: 962-6
MeSH Terms: Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung, Carcinoma, Small Cell, Female, Humans, Lung Neoplasms, Male, Middle Aged, Neoplasms, Second Primary, Survival Rate, Treatment Outcome
Show Abstract · Added March 27, 2014
BACKGROUND - Development of non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) in patients previously treated for small cell carcinoma (SCLC/NSCLC) is well described; however, little is known about clinical outcome.
METHODS - A single-institution 20-year review was performed. Patient characteristics and survival for SCLC/ NSCLC patients were compared with those for control patients matched for stage, resection, and previous malignancy.
RESULTS - One thousand four hundred four patients with small cell carcinoma were identified, and 29 underwent therapy for metachronous NSCLC: 11 of 29 patients underwent surgical resection, 10 of these 11 (90%) were stage I. Compared with surgically treated stage I NSCLC patients, SCLC/NSCLC patients were more likely to have squamous histology (70% versus 35%, p = 0.026); and subanatomic resection (90% versus 17.4%, p < 0.0005). The SCLC/NSCLC patients had significantly poorer survival when compared with stage I NSCLC patients undergoing any resection (24.53 versus 74.43 months, p = 0.003) and stage I NSCLC patients receiving wedge resection (24.53 versus 58.39 months, p = 0.006). Survival was similar to NSCLC patients with a history of previous treated extrathoracic solid malignancy.
CONCLUSIONS - Surgical resection for SCLC/NSCLC patients is feasible, but poorer prognosis is noted when compared with stage-matched control patients. Surgical candidates should be carefully chosen, and alternative local control modalities considered.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
10 MeSH Terms
Combined chest wall resection with vertebrectomy and spinal reconstruction for the treatment of Pancoast tumors.
York JE, Walsh GL, Lang FF, Putnam JB, McCutcheon IE, Swisher SG, Komaki R, Gokaslan ZL
(1999) J Neurosurg 91: 74-80
MeSH Terms: Adenocarcinoma, Adult, Aged, Bone Cements, Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung, Carcinoma, Squamous Cell, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, Laminectomy, Lung Neoplasms, Male, Methylmethacrylate, Middle Aged, Neoplasm Invasiveness, Neoplasm Recurrence, Local, Neoplasm Staging, Neoplasms, Second Primary, Orthopedic Fixation Devices, Orthopedic Procedures, Pain, Pancoast Syndrome, Pneumonectomy, Spinal Neoplasms, Spine, Thoracic Neoplasms, Thoracic Surgical Procedures, Thoracotomy
Show Abstract · Added March 27, 2014
OBJECT - Traditionally, superior sulcus tumors of the lung that involve the chest wall and spinal column have been considered to be unresectable, and historically, patients harboring these tumors have been treated with local radiation therapy with, at best, modest results. The value of gross-total resection remains unclear in this patient population; however, with the recent advances in surgical technique and spinal instrumentation, procedures involving more radical removal of such tumors are now possible. At The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, the authors have developed a new technique for resecting superior sulcus tumors that invade the chest wall and spinal column. They present a technical description of this procedure and results in nine patients in whom stage IIIb superior sulcus tumors extensively invaded the vertebral column.
METHODS - These patients underwent gross-total tumor resection via a combined approach that included posterolateral thoracotomy, apical lobectomy, chest wall resection, laminectomy, vertebrectomy, anterior spinal column reconstruction with methylmethacrylate, and placement of spinal instrumentation. There were six men and three women, with a mean age of 55 years (range 36-72 years). Histological examination revealed squamous cell carcinoma (three patients), adenocarcinoma (four patients), and large cell carcinoma (two patients). The mean postoperative follow-up period was 16 months. All patients are currently ambulatory or remained ambulatory until they died. Pain related to tumor invasion improved in four patients and remained unchanged in five. In three patients instrumentation failed and required revision. There was one case of cerebrospinal fluid leakage that was treated with lumbar drainage and one case of wound breakdown that required revision. Two patients experienced local tumor recurrence, and one patient developed a second primary lung tumor.
CONCLUSIONS - The authors conclude that in selected patients, combined radical resection of superior sulcus tumors of the lung that involve the chest wall and spinal column may represent an acceptable treatment modality that can offer a potential cure while preserving neurological function and providing pain control.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
28 MeSH Terms
Pathologic features of initial adenomas as predictors for metachronous adenomas of the rectum.
Yang G, Zheng W, Sun QR, Shu XO, Li WD, Yu H, Shen GF, Shen YZ, Potter JD, Zheng S
(1998) J Natl Cancer Inst 90: 1661-5
MeSH Terms: Adenoma, Adult, China, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Neoplasms, Second Primary, Predictive Value of Tests, Rectal Neoplasms, Risk, Severity of Illness Index, Sigmoidoscopy
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
BACKGROUND - Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in the world, arising mostly from pre-existing adenomatous polyps (adenomas) of the large bowel. Patients with colorectal adenomas are at increased risk of colorectal cancer because of a high recurrence rate for adenomas. We followed a cohort of 1490 patients with rectal adenomas to determine whether recurrence might be related to pathologic characteristics of the initial adenomas.
METHODS - The patients were identified in Haining County, China, from 1977 through 1978 by means of examination with a 15-cm rigid sigmoidoscope. They were followed by endoscopic examination at years 2, 4, 6, 11, and 16 after their initial polypectomy. New adenomas in the rectum were identified in 280 patients in these follow-up examinations.
RESULTS - Statistically significant twofold to threefold elevated risks of metachronous (recurrent) adenomas were observed for patients who had more than two initial adenomas or whose most advanced initial adenoma was more than 1.0 cm in size, was of villous/tubulovillous type, or showed moderate to severe dysplasia. Much stronger associations were observed for advanced metachronous neoplasms, which are defined as cancers or adenomas with severe dysplasia, with multivariate adjusted relative risks (95% confidence interval) of 4.2 (1.8-9.9) for a large initial adenoma (>1.0 cm), 8.1 (4.2-15.6) for villous/tubulovillous architecture, and 14.4 (5.0-41.3) for severe dysplasia. In particular, patients who had a large (>1.0 cm) adenoma with severe dysplasia at baseline had a relative risk of 37 (7.8-174.7) of developing advanced metachronous neoplasms compared with patients who had small adenoma(s) with mild dysplasia.
CONCLUSIONS - The risk of metachronous adenomas is closely related to the pathology of initial adenomas, thus allowing identification of a high-risk group of adenoma patients for close surveillance after their initial polypectomy.
0 Communities
2 Members
0 Resources
13 MeSH Terms
Anaplastic renal cell carcinoma following neuroblastoma.
Krigman HR, Bentley RC, Strickland DK, Miller CR, Dehner LP, Washington K
(1995) Med Pediatr Oncol 25: 52-9
MeSH Terms: Anaplasia, Carcinoma, Renal Cell, Child, Combined Modality Therapy, Female, Humans, Immunohistochemistry, Infant, Kidney Neoplasms, Neoplasms, Second Primary, Neuroblastoma
Show Abstract · Added April 12, 2016
Renal cell carcinoma is unusual in children. We report a case of anaplastic renal cell carcinoma arising in a 7-year-old girl following treatment for Stage III neuroblastoma. The renal cell carcinoma has unusual histologic and ultrastructural features, which are discussed. The case is further unusual in that few children with advanced stage neuroblastoma survive long enough to develop second malignant neoplasms.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
11 MeSH Terms
Osteosarcoma oncogene expression detected by in situ hybridization.
Wang H, Rodgers WH, Chmell MJ, Svitek C, Schwartz HS
(1995) J Orthop Res 13: 671-8
MeSH Terms: Adult, Animals, Bone Neoplasms, Child, Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic, Humans, In Situ Hybridization, Matrix Metalloproteinase 3, Matrix Metalloproteinase 7, Metalloendopeptidases, Mice, Neoplasm Proteins, Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced, Neoplasms, Second Primary, Osteosarcoma, Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-fos, RNA Probes, RNA, Neoplasm, Transforming Growth Factor beta
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
Fifteen archival human osteosarcoma specimens were examined by in situ hybridization for the expression of human and mouse transforming growth factor-beta (isoforms 1, 2, and 3), c-fos, and metalloproteinase (stromelysin-3 and matrilysin). Osteosarcoma subtypes were confirmed by review of patients' radiographs, histopathology, and age at diagnosis. The outcome and method of treatment were documented. The subtypes of osteosarcoma consisted of nine conventional osteosarcomas and two each of fibroblastic, telangiectatic, and post-radiation osteosarcomas. Each specimen was histologically examined under light microscopy, and then adjacent paraffin sections were assayed with sense and anti-sense RNA probes by in situ hybridization. The probes localized to the neoplastic cells, confirming the methodology of the technique. Human transforming growth factor-beta 1 had the most uniform binding affinity to the osteosarcomas examined and was more specific in binding than mouse transforming growth factor-beta 1. Specific mRNA encoding for the transforming growth factor-beta s, c-fos, and metalloproteinases are detectable in patterns within osteosarcoma cells, and collectively, their expression parallels the different histopathologic subtypes. The less differentiated subtypes (telangiectatic and post-radiation osteosarcomas) expressed the fewest molecular markers. Osteosarcoma is a heterogeneous tumor. Differential expression of matrilysin in osteosarcoma is the first reported detection of metalloproteinase activity in human skeletal sarcoma.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
19 MeSH Terms