Other search tools

About this data

The publication data currently available has been vetted by Vanderbilt faculty, staff, administrators and trainees. The data itself is retrieved directly from NCBI's PubMed and is automatically updated on a weekly basis to ensure accuracy and completeness.

If you have any questions or comments, please contact us.

Results: 351 to 358 of 358

Publication Record

Connections

Monitoring the safety of childhood immunizations: methods of linking and augmenting computerized data bases for epidemiologic studies.
Griffin MR, Ray WA, Fought RL, Foster MA, Hays A, Schaffner W
(1988) Am J Prev Med 4: 5-13
MeSH Terms: Central Nervous System Diseases, Cohort Studies, Computer Communication Networks, Computer Systems, Diphtheria-Tetanus-Pertussis Vaccine, Humans, Infant, Infant, Newborn, Medicaid, Medical Record Linkage, Medical Records, Sudden Infant Death, Tennessee, Time Factors, United States, Vaccination, Vital Statistics
Added March 5, 2014
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
17 MeSH Terms
Eicosanoids and sudden cardiac death.
Nowak J, Murray JJ, FitzGerald GA, Wehr CJ, Hammon JW, Oates JA
(1987) Adv Prostaglandin Thromboxane Leukot Res 17A: 20-4
MeSH Terms: Aspirin, Blood Platelets, Blood Vessels, Death, Sudden, Fatty Acids, Unsaturated, Heart Diseases, Humans, Smoking
Added December 10, 2013
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
8 MeSH Terms
Aspirin in the prevention of catastrophes of the coronary circulation.
Oates JA
(1989) Adv Prostaglandin Thromboxane Leukot Res 19: 57-63
MeSH Terms: Aspirin, Coronary Circulation, Coronary Disease, Death, Sudden, Humans
Added December 10, 2013
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
5 MeSH Terms
Increased adventitial mast cells in a patient with coronary spasm.
Forman MB, Oates JA, Robertson D, Robertson RM, Roberts LJ, Virmani R
(1985) N Engl J Med 313: 1138-41
MeSH Terms: Adult, Angina Pectoris, Variant, Cell Count, Coronary Angiography, Coronary Vasospasm, Coronary Vessels, Death, Sudden, Histamine Release, Humans, Male, Mast Cells, Prostaglandin D2, Prostaglandins D, SRS-A
Added December 10, 2013
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
14 MeSH Terms
Methodological issues in evaluating expanded Medicaid coverage for pregnant women.
Piper JM, Ray WA, Griffin MR, Fought R, Daughtery JR, Mitchel E
(1990) Am J Epidemiol 132: 561-71
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Birth Certificates, Death Certificates, Female, Fetal Death, Humans, Labor, Obstetric, Medicaid, Medical Record Linkage, Middle Aged, Pregnancy, Pregnancy Outcome, Tennessee, United States
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
In a recent effort to lower the US infant mortality rate, Congress has expanded the Medicaid coverage options that states may offer pregnant women. Careful evaluation of changes in perinatal outcome associated with this expanded coverage is needed. The linkage of Medicaid enrollment files of mothers and infants to birth, death, and fetal death certificates is an initial step in assessing the effectiveness that Medicaid coverage expansions have had on pregnancy outcome. Creation of such a database for Tennessee for 1984-1987 revealed that complete information on mother, delivery, and child is available for only three quarters of Medicaid-reimbursed births. Furthermore, Medicaid-reimbursed births that had all three data components had different characteristics and lower mortality rates than did births with missing elements. Those persons seeking to evaluate expanded Medicaid coverage for pregnant women need to be aware that consideration of only those births for whom there is information on mother, delivery, and child may lead to serious underascertainment of fetal, perinatal, and neonatal mortality rates.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
15 MeSH Terms
Hemodynamics versus biopsy findings during cardiac transplant rejection.
Bolling SF, Putnam JB, Abrams GD, McKay AM, Deeb GM
(1991) Ann Thorac Surg 51: 52-5
MeSH Terms: Adult, Biopsy, Cause of Death, Female, Graft Rejection, Heart Transplantation, Hemodynamics, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Survival Rate
Show Abstract · Added March 27, 2014
Before the use of cyclosporine as the major component for immunosuppression after cardiac transplantation, rejection was accompanied by catastrophic hemodynamic decompensation. However, the hemodynamic changes that occur during rejection after cardiac transplantation in patients treated with cyclosporine have not been clearly described. Between July 1986 and October 1989, 89 adults underwent orthotopic heart transplantation at the University of Michigan Medical Center. All patients received triple-drug therapy immunosuppression consisting of steroids, cyclosporine, and azathioprine. Cardiac hemodynamics were measured and correlated with the histologic assessment of rejection. There have been ten deaths among these 89 patients for an overall survival of 89%. There were no deaths from rejection. One hundred fifty-three of the biopsy specimens were read as grade 0, 31 were grade 1, 75 were grade 2, 103 were grade 3, and 9 patients had grade 4 biopsy specimens. No hemodynamic differences were noted in patients with increasing grade of rejection. Five patients (5/9, 55%) with severe rejection (grade 4) had symptoms of congestive heart failure at the time of biopsy. These symptomatic grade 4 patients differed from asymptomatic grade 4 patients only in cardiac output (2.9 versus 5.2 L/min). Overall hemodynamic decompensation was not evident as rejection grade increased. Routine serial endomyocardial biopsies remain the procedure of choice in the diagnosis of rejection in the asymptomatic patient after cardiac transplantation as hemodynamics do not predict degree of rejection.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
11 MeSH Terms
Role for "uremic toxin" in the progressive loss of intact nephrons in chronic renal failure.
Motojima M, Nishijima F, Ikoma M, Kawamura T, Yoshioka T, Fogo AB, Sakai T, Ichikawa I
(1991) Kidney Int 40: 461-9
MeSH Terms: Animals, Carbon, Cell Death, Creatinine, Hypertrophy, Inulin, Kidney Failure, Chronic, Kidney Function Tests, Kidney Glomerulus, Male, Metabolic Clearance Rate, Nephrectomy, Nephrons, Oxides, Peritoneal Dialysis, Rats, Rats, Inbred Strains, Sclerosis, Sorption Detoxification, Uremia
Show Abstract · Added January 20, 2012
We studied the effect on the progression of glomerular sclerosis of two different experimental maneuvers, peritoneal dialysis and oral adsorbent, which remove circulating substances in different fashions. Munich-Wistar rats with established glomerular sclerosis, verified by renal biopsy analysis at seven weeks after subtotal nephrectomy, were treated for four weeks with either peritoneal dialysis (PD) or oral charcoal adsorbent (AST-120). Treatment was initiated at eight weeks. Rats were paired in treatment and control groups according to the similarity in the degree of sclerosis determined at biopsy with a minimum of 50 glomeruli analyzed. Systolic blood pressure and BUN and creatinine clearance, measured at seven to eight weeks, were not different among groups. In Group 2 rats, PD was performed with 1.5% dextrose for eight one-hour cycles, six days per week, while Group 1 control rats had zero indwelling time of the dialysate. Group 4 rats received AST-120, an oral adsorbent charcoal, mixed 5% by weight with standard rat chow and given ad libitum from 8 to 12 weeks after subtotal nephrectomy, while control Group 3 rats received only rat chow. Whole kidney GFR at 12 weeks was significantly higher in Group 2 PD versus Group 1 control (0.50 +/- 0.08 vs. 0.30 +/- 0.05 ml/min, P less than 0.05). There was no statistical difference for BUN and whole kidney creatinine or inulin clearance in Group 4 AST-120 treated versus Group 3 control rats. Light microscopic studies in autopsy specimens revealed that both PD and AST-120 attenuated progression of glomerular sclerosis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
1 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
20 MeSH Terms
Interaction of epidermal growth factor and transforming growth factor beta in human prostatic epithelial cells in culture.
Sutkowski DM, Fong CJ, Sensibar JA, Rademaker AW, Sherwood ER, Kozlowski JM, Lee C
(1992) Prostate 21: 133-43
MeSH Terms: Analysis of Variance, Cell Death, Cell Division, Cells, Cultured, Dose-Response Relationship, Drug, Drug Interactions, Epidermal Growth Factor, Epithelium, Humans, Male, Prostate, Transforming Growth Factor beta
Show Abstract · Added October 18, 2015
The present study was conducted to study the interaction between epidermal growth factor (EGF) and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) in benign human prostatic epithelial cells in culture. Primary cultures of human prostatic epithelial cells were grown in complete WAJC, which consisted of WAJC-404 medium and, in addition to other defined additives, EGF and bovine pituitary extract (BPE). Incomplete WAJC contained the same composition except EGF and BPE were deleted. TGF-beta was added into media at concentrations of 0, 0.1, and 1.0 ng/ml. When cells were grown in complete WAJC, they proliferated rapidly. Cell proliferation was greatly suppressed when incomplete WAJC was used. Addition of TGF-beta to these cultures caused a significant reduction in the final cell number when either complete WAJC or incomplete WAJC was used. In additional experiments, cells were prelabeled with 3H-thymidine for 72 hr prior to treatment with TGF-beta. The percentage of radioactivity released into the medium at the end of a 6-day culture was used as an indication of the extent of cell death. Trypan blue exclusion test was also used to assess the extent of cell death. Addition of TGF-beta into complete WAJC did not significantly affect the extent of cell death beyond what was considered as the result of normal cellular turnover. Addition of TGF-beta into incomplete WAJC, however, caused a significant increase in the percent of cell death in the culture. These results demonstrated an interaction between EGF and TGF-beta in proliferation and cell death in human prostatic epithelia in culture. In the presence of EGF alone in the culture medium, prostatic epithelial cells were stimulated to proliferate. The rate of proliferation was greatly diminished when EGF was deleted from the medium or when TGF-beta was added in the presence of EGF. Finally, cell death was induced when TGF-beta was added into the medium in the absence of EGF.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
12 MeSH Terms