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Activation of Nrf2 attenuates delayed gastric emptying in obesity induced diabetic (T2DM) female mice.
Sampath C, Sprouse JC, Freeman ML, Gangula PR
(2019) Free Radic Biol Med 135: 132-143
MeSH Terms: Acrolein, Animals, Antioxidants, Diabetes Complications, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Diet, High-Fat, Gastric Emptying, Gastroparesis, Humans, MAP Kinase Signaling System, Mice, Muscle Relaxation, NF-E2-Related Factor 2, Nitric Oxide Synthase Type I, Obesity, Stomach, p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
Diabetic gastroparesis (GP) is a clinical syndrome characterized by delayed gastric emptying (DGE). Loss of Nrf2 (Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2) led to reduced nNOSα mediated gastric motility and DGE. The molecular signaling of cinnamaldehyde (CNM) mediated Nrf2 activation and its mechanistic role on DGE were further investigated in obese/T2D female mice. Adult female homozygous Nfe2l2 (C57BL/6J) and their wild-type (WT) littermates (Nfe2l2) mice were fed with high fat diet (HFD; Obese/T2D model), or normal diet (ND) with or without CNM (50 mg/kg b.w; i.p). Supplementation of CNM attenuated (p < 0.05) DGE in WT female but not in Nrf2 KO Obese/T2D mice. CNM (1) normalized serum estradiol-17β levels, (2) induced gastric Nrf2 and phase II antioxidant enzymes through extracellular signal-regulated kinase, (ERK)/c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)/p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), (3) reduced glucose synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK3β) and aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and this was associated with (4) increased estrogen receptor expression, BH (Cofactor of nNOS) biosynthesis enzyme GCH-1 and nNOSα dimerization in WT Obese/T2 diabetic female mice. In addition, CNM restored impaired nitrergic relaxation in hyperglycemic conditions. These findings emphasize the importance of Nrf2 in maintaining nNOSα mediated GE and may have a translational relevance to treat obese/diabetic gastroparesis in women.
Copyright © 2019. Published by Elsevier Inc.
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17 MeSH Terms
Nod1 Imprints Inflammatory and Carcinogenic Responses toward the Gastric Pathogen .
Suarez G, Romero-Gallo J, Piazuelo MB, Sierra JC, Delgado AG, Washington MK, Shah SC, Wilson KT, Peek RM
(2019) Cancer Res 79: 1600-1611
MeSH Terms: Animals, Carcinogenesis, Cytokines, Gastric Mucosa, Helicobacter pylori, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Nod1 Signaling Adaptor Protein, Stomach Neoplasms
Show Abstract · Added February 23, 2019
() is the strongest known risk for gastric cancer. The type IV secretion system is an oncogenic locus that translocates peptidoglycan into host cells, where it is recognized by NOD1, an innate immune receptor. Beyond this, the role of NOD1 in -induced cancer remains undefined. To address this knowledge gap, we infected two genetic models of Nod1 deficiency with the strain PMSS1: C57BL/6 mice, which rarely develop cancer, and INS-GAS FVB/N mice, which commonly develop cancer. Infected C57BL/6 and INS-GAS mice acutely developed more severe gastritis, and INS-GAS mice developed gastric dysplasia more frequently compared with mice. Because genotype status did not alter microbial phenotypes of adapted , we investigated host immunologic responses. infection of mice led to significantly increased gastric mucosal levels of Th1, Th17, and Th2 cytokines compared with Nod1 wild-type (WT) mice. To define the role of specific innate immune cells, we quantified cytokine secretion from -infected primary gastric organoids generated from WT or mice that were cocultured with or without WT or macrophages. Infection increased cytokine production from gastric epithelial cells and macrophages and elevations were significantly increased with Nod1 deficiency. Furthermore, infection altered the polarization status of macrophages compared with macrophages. Collectively, these studies demonstrate that loss of Nod1 augments inflammatory and injury responses to . Nod1 may exert its restrictive role by altering macrophage polarization, leading to immune evasion and microbial persistence. SIGNIFICANCE: These findings suggest that manipulation of NOD1 may represent a novel strategy to prevent or treat pathologic outcomes induced by infection.
©2019 American Association for Cancer Research.
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10 MeSH Terms
Intracellular Degradation of Helicobacter pylori VacA Toxin as a Determinant of Gastric Epithelial Cell Viability.
Foegeding NJ, Raghunathan K, Campbell AM, Kim SW, Lau KS, Kenworthy AK, Cover TL, Ohi MD
(2019) Infect Immun 87:
MeSH Terms: Autophagy, Bacterial Proteins, Cell Line, Cell Survival, Epithelial Cells, Gastric Mucosa, Helicobacter Infections, Helicobacter pylori, Humans, Hydrogen-Ion Concentration, Muramidase, Protein Stability, Protein Transport, Proteolysis
Show Abstract · Added February 7, 2019
VacA is a secreted pore-forming toxin that induces cell vacuolation and contributes to the pathogenesis of gastric cancer and peptic ulcer disease. We observed that purified VacA has relatively little effect on the viability of AGS gastric epithelial cells, but the presence of exogenous weak bases such as ammonium chloride (NHCl) enhances the susceptibility of these cells to VacA-induced vacuolation and cell death. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that NHCl augments VacA toxicity by altering the intracellular trafficking of VacA or inhibiting intracellular VacA degradation. We observed VacA colocalization with LAMP1- and LC3-positive vesicles in both the presence and absence of NHCl, indicating that NHCl does not alter VacA trafficking to lysosomes or autophagosomes. Conversely, we found that supplemental NHCl significantly increases the intracellular stability of VacA. By conducting experiments using chemical inhibitors, stable ATG5 knockdown cell lines, and ATG16L1 knockout cells (generated using CRISPR/Cas9), we show that VacA degradation is independent of autophagy and proteasome activity but dependent on lysosomal acidification. We conclude that weak bases like ammonia, potentially generated during infection by urease and other enzymes, enhance VacA toxicity by inhibiting toxin degradation.
Copyright © 2019 American Society for Microbiology.
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14 MeSH Terms
MEK Inhibitor Reverses Metaplasia and Allows Re-Emergence of Normal Lineages in Helicobacter pylori-Infected Gerbils.
Yang Q, Yasuda T, Choi E, Toyoda T, Roland JT, Uchida E, Yoshida H, Seto Y, Goldenring JR, Nomura S
(2019) Gastroenterology 156: 577-581.e4
MeSH Terms: Acrylonitrile, Aniline Compounds, Animals, Benzimidazoles, Biopsy, Needle, Disease Models, Animal, Gastric Mucosa, Gerbillinae, Helicobacter Infections, Helicobacter pylori, Immunohistochemistry, Male, Metaplasia, Random Allocation, Reference Values, Treatment Outcome
Added November 14, 2018
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16 MeSH Terms
Evaluation of Lineage Changes in the Gastric Mucosa Following Infection With and Specified Intestinal Flora in INS-GAS Mice.
Pinzon-Guzman C, Meyer AR, Wise R, Choi E, Muthupalani S, Wang TC, Fox JG, Goldenring JR
(2019) J Histochem Cytochem 67: 53-63
MeSH Terms: Adenocarcinoma, Animals, Gastric Mucosa, Gastrointestinal Microbiome, Helicobacter Infections, Helicobacter pylori, Hyaluronan Receptors, Immunohistochemistry, Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins, Male, Mice, Mucin-4, Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases, Stomach Neoplasms
Show Abstract · Added November 14, 2018
Gastric adenocarcinoma develops in metaplastic mucosa associated with infection in the stomach. We have sought to evaluate the precise lineage changes in the stomachs of insulin-gastrin (INS-GAS) mice infected with and/or intestinal flora (Altered Schaedler's Flora; ASF). Stomachs from groups infected with contained progressive spasmolytic polypeptide-expressing metaplasia (SPEM) compared with germ-free and mice infected with ASF alone. The overall phenotype of the -infected mice was dominated by Ulex europaeus lectin (UEAI)-positive foveolar hyperplasia that was distinct from GSII/CD44v9-positive SPEM. However, in the mice with co-infected with ASF, we identified a subpopulation of UEAI-positive foveolar cells that co-expressed intestinal mucin 4 (MUC4). These regions of foveolar cells were variably positive for CD44v9 as well as TFF3. Interestingly, an intravascular lesion identified in a dual /ASF-infected mouse expressed both UEAI and . Finally, we identified an increase in the number of tuft cells within the mucosa of -infected groups. Our findings suggest that infection promotes foveolar hyperplasia as well as metaplasia, while co-infection may promote progressive foveolar and metaplastic lesions as well as dysplasia. Grading of gastric lesions in mice as preneoplastic requires multiple immunostaining markers to assign lineage derivation and behavior.
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14 MeSH Terms
Helicobacter pylori pathogen regulates p14ARF tumor suppressor and autophagy in gastric epithelial cells.
Horvat A, Noto JM, Ramatchandirin B, Zaika E, Palrasu M, Wei J, Schneider BG, El-Rifai W, Peek RM, Zaika AI
(2018) Oncogene 37: 5054-5065
MeSH Terms: Antigens, Bacterial, Autophagy, Bacterial Proteins, Cell Line, Tumor, Down-Regulation, Epithelial Cells, Gastric Mucosa, HCT116 Cells, Helicobacter Infections, Helicobacter pylori, Humans, Signal Transduction, Stomach, Stomach Neoplasms, Tumor Suppressor Protein p14ARF, Tumor Suppressor Protein p53, Ubiquitin-Protein Ligases, Up-Regulation, Virulence Factors
Show Abstract · Added September 25, 2018
Infection with Helicobacter pylori is one of the strongest risk factors for development of gastric cancer. Although these bacteria infect approximately half of the world's population, only a small fraction of infected individuals develops gastric malignancies. Interactions between host and bacterial virulence factors are complex and interrelated, making it difficult to elucidate specific processes associated with H. pylori-induced tumorigenesis. In this study, we found that H. pylori inhibits p14ARF tumor suppressor by inducing its degradation. This effect was found to be strain-specific. Downregulation of p14ARF induced by H. pylori leads to inhibition of autophagy in a p53-independent manner in infected cells. We identified TRIP12 protein as E3 ubiquitin ligase that is upregulated by H. pylori, inducing ubiquitination and subsequent degradation of p14ARF protein. Using isogenic H. pylori mutants, we found that induction of TRIP12 is mediated by bacterial virulence factor CagA. Increased expression of TRIP12 protein was found in infected gastric epithelial cells in vitro and human gastric mucosa of H. pylori-infected individuals. In conclusion, our data demonstrate a new mechanism of ARF inhibition that may affect host-bacteria interactions and facilitate tumorigenic transformation in the stomach.
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19 MeSH Terms
Lrig1+ gastric isthmal progenitor cells restore normal gastric lineage cells during damage recovery in adult mouse stomach.
Choi E, Lantz TL, Vlacich G, Keeley TM, Samuelson LC, Coffey RJ, Goldenring JR, Powell AE
(2018) Gut 67: 1595-1605
MeSH Terms: Animals, Biomarkers, Cell Lineage, Disease Models, Animal, Gastric Mucosa, Membrane Glycoproteins, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Nerve Tissue Proteins, Predictive Value of Tests, Sensitivity and Specificity, Stem Cells, Stomach Ulcer, Wound Healing
Show Abstract · Added September 27, 2017
OBJECTIVE - Lrig1 is a marker of proliferative and quiescent stem cells in the skin and intestine. We examined whether Lrig1-expressing cells are long-lived gastric progenitors in gastric glands in the mouse stomach. We also investigated how the Lrig1-expressing progenitor cells contribute to the regeneration of normal gastric mucosa by lineage commitment to parietal cells after acute gastric injury in mice.
DESIGN - We performed lineage labelling using (Lrig1/YFP) or (Lrig1/LacZ) mice to examine whether the Lrig1-YFP-marked cells are gastric progenitor cells. We studied whether Lrig1-YFP-marked cells give rise to normal gastric lineage cells in damaged mucosa using Lrig1/YFP mice after treatment with DMP-777 to induce acute injury. We also studied Lrig1- (Lrig1 knockout) mice to examine whether the Lrig1 protein is required for regeneration of gastric corpus mucosa after acute injury.
RESULTS - Lrig1-YFP-marked cells give rise to gastric lineage epithelial cells both in the gastric corpus and antrum, in contrast to published results that Lgr5 only marks progenitor cells within the gastric antrum. Lrig1-YFP-marked cells contribute to replacement of damaged gastric oxyntic glands during the recovery phase after acute oxyntic atrophy in the gastric corpus. Lrig1 null mice recovered normally from acute gastric mucosal injury indicating that Lrig1 protein is not required for lineage differentiation. Lrig1+ isthmal progenitor cells did not contribute to transdifferentiating chief cell lineages after acute oxyntic atrophy.
CONCLUSIONS - Lrig1 marks gastric corpus epithelial progenitor cells capable of repopulating the damaged oxyntic mucosa by differentiating into normal gastric lineage cells in mouse stomach.
© Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.
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14 MeSH Terms
Increased expression of deleted in malignant brain tumors (DMBT1) gene in precancerous gastric lesions: Findings from human and animal studies.
Garay J, Piazuelo MB, Lopez-Carrillo L, Leal YA, Majumdar S, Li L, Cruz-Rodriguez N, Serrano-Gomez SJ, Busso CS, Schneider BG, Delgado AG, Bravo LE, Crist AM, Meadows SM, Camargo MC, Wilson KT, Correa P, Zabaleta J
(2017) Oncotarget 8: 47076-47089
MeSH Terms: Animals, Calcium-Binding Proteins, DNA-Binding Proteins, Disease Models, Animal, Ethnic Groups, Gastric Mucosa, Gene Expression Profiling, Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic, Genetic Association Studies, Helicobacter Infections, Humans, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Neoplasm Staging, Precancerous Conditions, Receptors, Cell Surface, Stomach Neoplasms, Tumor Suppressor Proteins
Show Abstract · Added June 29, 2017
Helicobacter pylori infection triggers a cascade of inflammatory stages that may lead to the appearance of non-atrophic gastritis, multifocal atrophic, intestinal metaplasia, dysplasia, and cancer. Deleted in malignant brain tumors 1 (DMBT1) belongs to the group of secreted scavenger receptor cysteine-rich proteins and is considered to be involved in host defense by binding to pathogens. Initial studies showed its deletion and loss of expression in a variety of tumors but the role of this gene in tumor development is not completely understood. Here, we examined the role of DMBT1 in gastric precancerous lesions in Caucasian, African American and Hispanic individuals as well as in the development of gastric pathology in a mouse model of H. pylori infection. We found that in 3 different populations, mucosal DMBT1 expression was significantly increased (2.5 fold) in individuals with dysplasia compared to multifocal atrophic gastritis without intestinal metaplasia; the increase was also observed in individuals with advanced gastritis and positive H. pylori infection. In our animal model, H. pylori infection of Dmbt1-/- mice resulted in significantly higher levels of gastritis, more extensive mucous metaplasia and reduced Il33 expression levels in the gastric mucosa compared to H. pylori-infected wild type mice. Our data in the animal model suggest that in response to H. pylori infection DMBT1 may mediate mucosal protection reducing the risk of developing gastric precancerous lesions. However, the increased expression in human gastric precancerous lesions points to a more complex role of DMBT1 in gastric carcinogenesis.
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18 MeSH Terms
Bile acids and bariatric surgery.
Albaugh VL, Banan B, Ajouz H, Abumrad NN, Flynn CR
(2017) Mol Aspects Med 56: 75-89
MeSH Terms: Animals, Bile Acids and Salts, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Enterohepatic Circulation, Gastrectomy, Gastric Bypass, Gastrointestinal Microbiome, Gene Expression Regulation, Glucose, Homeostasis, Humans, Insulin Resistance, Obesity, Morbid, Receptors, Cytoplasmic and Nuclear, Receptors, G-Protein-Coupled, Rodentia, Signal Transduction
Show Abstract · Added June 6, 2017
Bariatric surgery, specifically Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) and vertical sleeve gastrectomy (VSG), are the most effective and durable treatments for morbid obesity and potentially a viable treatment for type 2 diabetes (T2D). The resolution rate of T2D following these procedures is between 40 and 80% and far surpasses that achieved by medical management alone. The molecular basis for this improvement is not entirely understood, but has been attributed in part to the altered enterohepatic circulation of bile acids. In this review we highlight how bile acids potentially contribute to improved lipid and glucose homeostasis, insulin sensitivity and energy expenditure after these procedures. The impact of altered bile acid levels in enterohepatic circulation is also associated with changes in gut microflora, which may further contribute to some of these beneficial effects. We highlight the beneficial effects of experimental surgical procedures in rodents that alter bile secretory flow without gastric restriction or altering nutrient flow. This information suggests a role for bile acids beyond dietary fat emulsification in altering whole body glucose and lipid metabolism strongly, and also suggests emerging roles for the activation of the bile acid receptors farnesoid x receptor (FXR) and G-protein coupled bile acid receptor (TGR5) in these improvements. The limitations of rodent studies and the current state of our understanding is reviewed and the potential effects of bile acids mediating the short- and long-term metabolic improvements after bariatric surgery is critically examined.
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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17 MeSH Terms
Optimizing surgical resection of the bleeding Meckel diverticulum in children.
Robinson JR, Correa H, Brinkman AS, Lovvorn HN
(2017) J Pediatr Surg 52: 1610-1615
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Child, Child, Preschool, Diagnostic Tests, Routine, Digestive System Surgical Procedures, Female, Gastric Mucosa, Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage, Humans, Male, Meckel Diverticulum, Retrospective Studies, Tertiary Care Centers, Treatment Outcome
Show Abstract · Added November 8, 2017
PURPOSE - Meckel diverticula containing gastric heterotopia predispose to local hyperacidity, mucosal ulceration, and gastrointestinal bleeding in children. Eradication of acid-producing oxyntic cells is performed by either of two surgical methods: segmental enterectomy including the diverticulum or diverticulectomy only.
METHODS - Retrospective review of all children having surgical resection of a Meckel diverticulum at a tertiary-referral children's hospital from 2002 to 2016 was performed. Demographic data, surgical method, pathological specimens, and outcomes were evaluated.
RESULTS - 102 children underwent surgical resection of a Meckel diverticulum during the study period. 27 (26.5%) children presented with bleeding, of which 16 (59%) had diverticulectomy only, and 11 (41%) had segmental ileal resection. All Meckel diverticula in children presenting with bleeding contained gastric heterotopia, and resection margins were free of gastric mucosa. Histologically, 19 specimens showed microscopic features of ulceration, on average 2.95mm (SD 4.49) from the nearest gastric mucosa (range: 0-16mm). Mean length of hospitalization after ileal resection was 4.0days (SD 1.2) compared to 1.6days (SD 0.9) for diverticulectomy only (p<0.001), with no re-bleeding occurrences.
CONCLUSION - In the operative management of children having a bleeding Meckel diverticulum, diverticulectomy-only completely eradicates gastric heterotopia without increased risk of continued bleeding or complications and significantly shortens hospitalization.
LEVEL OF EVIDENCE - Treatment Study: Level III.
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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14 MeSH Terms