Other search tools

About this data

The publication data currently available has been vetted by Vanderbilt faculty, staff, administrators and trainees. The data itself is retrieved directly from NCBI's PubMed and is automatically updated on a weekly basis to ensure accuracy and completeness.

If you have any questions or comments, please contact us.

Results: 11 to 20 of 486

Publication Record

Connections

Neuroimaging Advances in Pediatric Stroke.
Donahue MJ, Dlamini N, Bhatia A, Jordan LC
(2019) Stroke 50: 240-248
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Anemia, Sickle Cell, Aneurysm, Dissecting, Brain, Cerebral Arteries, Cerebral Infarction, Cerebrovascular Circulation, Cerebrovascular Disorders, Child, Child, Preschool, Diagnosis, Differential, Disease Progression, Humans, Infant, Intracranial Aneurysm, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Moyamoya Disease, Neuroimaging, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Biomolecular, Stroke Rehabilitation, Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Added March 24, 2020
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
MeSH Terms
Radiation From Kidney-Ureter-Bladder Radiographs Is Not Trivial.
Kuebker J, Shuman J, Hsi RS, Herrell SD, Miller NL
(2019) Urology 125: 46-49
MeSH Terms: Female, Humans, Kidney, Male, Middle Aged, Radiation Dosage, Radiation Exposure, Retrospective Studies, Tomography, X-Ray Computed, Ureter, Urinary Bladder, Urolithiasis
Show Abstract · Added February 26, 2019
OBJECTIVE - To estimate effective dose of kidney-ureter-bladder (KUB) radiographs in a contemporary population of patients with urolithiasis.
METHODS - A retrospective review was performed to identify patients visiting a urology clinic for urolithiasis where a KUB was obtained and whom had a recent computed tomography (CT). Effective dose for KUBs was estimated using a Monte Carlo based simulation program and for CT utilizing the reported dose-length-product. Age, gender, body mass index, and abdominal diameter were analyzed for association with effective dose. KUBs performed at outside facilities in referred patient were compared to those obtained locally when available.
RESULTS - Fifty-four patients were identified meeting criteria. The majority (92.6%) of KUBs contained multiple radiographs. Mean effective dose was 2.15 mSv ± 1.67 mSv. Only 26% of examinations effective dose was under 1 mSv. Body mass index, abdominal thickness, and image count were all associated with an increase in dose (P < .01 each). Similar to local KUBs, 88% of outside examinations contained multiple images.
CONCLUSION - KUB examinations in this contemporary setting are associated with a 2-fold higher effective dose then is often referenced. Increased effective dose is associated with increased patient size and number of images acquired. Nearly 1 in 5 patient's KUB effective dose was similar to a low-dose CT. KUBs role should be re-examined given its limited sensitivity, specificity, associated radiation, and other available imaging options.
Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
12 MeSH Terms
Using an artificial neural network to predict traumatic brain injury.
Hale AT, Stonko DP, Lim J, Guillamondegui OD, Shannon CN, Patel MB
(2018) J Neurosurg Pediatr 23: 219-226
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Algorithms, Area Under Curve, Brain Injuries, Traumatic, Child, False Positive Reactions, Female, Humans, Male, Neural Networks, Computer, Predictive Value of Tests, Sensitivity and Specificity, Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Show Abstract · Added January 23, 2019
In BriefPediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI) is common, but not all injuries require hospitalization. A computational tool for ruling-in patients who will have clinically relevant TBI (CRTBI) would be valuable, providing an evidence-based mechanism for safe discharge. Here, using data from 12,902 patients from the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network (PECARN) TBI data set, the authors utilize artificial intelligence to predict CRTBI using radiologist-interpreted CT information with > 99% sensitivity and an AUC of 0.99.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
13 MeSH Terms
Calcium Scoring for Cardiovascular Computed Tomography: How, When and Why?
Carr JJ
(2019) Radiol Clin North Am 57: 1-12
MeSH Terms: Cardiac-Gated Imaging Techniques, Cardiomyopathies, Coronary Artery Disease, Disease Progression, Humans, Radiographic Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted, Risk Assessment, Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Show Abstract · Added January 10, 2020
Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the United States and worldwide. Despite major advances in the treatment of acute myocardial infarction, enhanced prevention of ischemic heart disease remains critical to improving the health of individuals and communities. The computed tomographic coronary artery calcium score is an established imaging biomarker that identifies the presence and amount of coronary atherosclerosis in an individual and their future risk for clinical cardiovascular disease and premature cardiovascular death. This article describes the process of performing a computed tomography scan for coronary artery calcium, quantifying the score and interpreting the results.
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
MeSH Terms
Predictors of spontaneous ureteral stone passage in the presence of an indwelling ureteral stent.
Kuebker JM, Robles J, Kramer JJ, Miller NL, Herrell SD, Hsi RS
(2019) Urolithiasis 47: 395-400
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Catheters, Indwelling, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Retrospective Studies, Stents, Tomography, X-Ray Computed, Ureter, Ureteral Calculi, Ureteral Obstruction, Ureteroscopy, Urinary Catheters, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added February 26, 2019
Patients presenting acutely with obstructing stones often have a ureteral stent placed as a temporizing solution. Ureteroscopy is then commonly performed in a staged fashion, but occasionally the stone is found to have passed. We aimed to identify the frequency and predictors of ureteral stone passage with a stent in place. Records were reviewed to identify patients who had a stent placed for a single ureteral stone. Subsequent ureteroscopy or CT scan was used to ascertain stone passage. Effect of age, gender, BMI, stone diameter, alpha blocker use, urinary tract infection, hydronephrosis, and stent duration on stone passage was assessed. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were met in 209 patients. Mean maximum stone diameter was 6.5 ± 2.5 mm. Passage rates for stones < 3 mm, 3-4.9 mm, 5-6.9 mm, and ≥ 7 mm were 50%, 13%, 10%, and 0%, respectively. The overall rate of passage was 8%. Stone passage was associated with smaller maximum stone diameter, more distal stone location, and longer duration of stent before ureteroscopy/CT on univariate analysis (p < 0.01). Stone diameter and stent duration remained significantly associated on multivariable analysis (p = 0.001 and p = 0.05, respectively). Our findings suggest ureteral stone passage with a concurrent ureteral stent is not a rare event as it occurred in 14% of stones less then 7 mm in maximum diameter. Stone size and duration of stent before ureteroscopy or CT were found to be independent predictors of passage. Select patients with small ureteral stones who have been stented should be considered for a trial of urine straining or repeat imaging before subsequent ureteroscopy.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
17 MeSH Terms
Localized low-dose rhBMP-2 is effective at promoting bone regeneration in mandibular segmental defects.
Carlisle P, Guda T, Silliman DT, Burdette AJ, Talley AD, Alvarez R, Tucker D, Hale RG, Guelcher SA, BrownBaer PR
(2019) J Biomed Mater Res B Appl Biomater 107: 1491-1503
MeSH Terms: Animals, Bone Morphogenetic Protein 2, Bone Regeneration, Calcium Phosphates, Drug Delivery Systems, Durapatite, Humans, Mandible, Mandibular Injuries, Recombinant Proteins, Swine, Swine, Miniature, Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Show Abstract · Added March 20, 2020
At least 26% of recent battlefield injuries are to the craniomaxillofacial (CMF) region. Recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 2 (rhBMP-2) is used to treat CMF open fractures, but several complications have been associated with its use. This study tested the efficacy and safety of a lower (30% recommended) dose of rhBMP-2 to treat mandibular fractures. rhBMP-2 delivered via a polyurethane (PUR) and hydroxyapatite/β-tricalcium phosphate (Mastergraft®) scaffold was evaluated in a 2 cm segmental mandibular defect in minipigs. Bone regeneration was analyzed at 4, 8, and 12 weeks postsurgery using clinical computed tomography (CT) and rhBMP-2, and inflammatory marker concentrations were analyzed in serum and surgery-site drain effluent. CT scans revealed that pigs treated with PUR-Mastergraft® + rhBMP-2 had complete bone bridging, while the negative control group showed incomplete bone-bridging (n = 6). Volumetric analysis of regenerated bone showed that the PUR-Mastergraft® + rhBMP-2 treatment generated significantly more bone than control by 4 weeks, a trend that continued through 12 weeks. Variations in inflammatory analytes were detected in drain effluent samples and saliva but not in serum, suggesting a localized healing response. Importantly, the rhBMP-2 group did not exhibit an excessive increase in inflammatory analytes compared to control. Treatment with low-dose rhBMP-2 increases bone regeneration capacity in pigs with mandibular continuity defects and restores bone quality. Negative complications from rhBMP-2, such as excessive inflammatory analyte levels, were not observed. Together, these results suggest that treatment with low-dose rhBMP-2 is efficacious and may improve safety when treating CMF open fractures. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater 107B: 1491-1503, 2019.
© 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
13 MeSH Terms
Automated classification of osteomeatal complex inflammation on computed tomography using convolutional neural networks.
Chowdhury NI, Smith TL, Chandra RK, Turner JH
(2019) Int Forum Allergy Rhinol 9: 46-52
MeSH Terms: Adult, Artificial Intelligence, Automation, Laboratory, Chronic Disease, Female, Humans, Inflammation, Male, Nasal Obstruction, Neural Networks, Computer, Paranasal Sinuses, Prospective Studies, Rhinitis, Sinusitis, Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Show Abstract · Added July 23, 2020
BACKGROUND - Convolutional neural networks (CNNs) are advanced artificial intelligence algorithms well suited to image classification tasks with variable features. These have been used to great effect in various real-world applications including handwriting recognition, face detection, image search, and fraud prevention. We sought to retrain a robust CNN with coronal computed tomography (CT) images to classify osteomeatal complex (OMC) occlusion and assess the performance of this technology with rhinologic data.
METHODS - The Google Inception-V3 CNN trained with 1.28 million images was used as the base model. Preoperative coronal sections through the OMC were obtained from 239 patients enrolled in 2 prospective chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) outcomes studies, labeled according to OMC status, and mirrored to obtain a set of 956 images. Using this data, the classification layer of Inception-V3 was retrained in Python using a transfer learning method to adapt the CNN to the task of interpreting sinonasal CT images.
RESULTS - The retrained neural network achieved 85% classification accuracy for OMC occlusion, with a 95% confidence interval for algorithm accuracy of 78% to 92%. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis on the test set confirmed good classification ability of the CNN with an area under the ROC curve (AUC) of 0.87, significantly different than both random guessing and a dominant classifier that predicts the most common class (p < 0.0001).
CONCLUSION - Current state-of-the-art CNNs may be able to learn clinically relevant information from 2-dimensional sinonasal CT images with minimal supervision. Future work will extend this approach to 3-dimensional images in order to further refine this technology for possible clinical applications.
© 2018 ARS-AAOA, LLC.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
MeSH Terms
Maintaining oncologic integrity with minimally invasive resection of pediatric embryonal tumors.
Phelps HM, Ayers GD, Ndolo JM, Dietrich HL, Watson KD, Hilmes MA, Lovvorn HN
(2018) Surgery 164: 333-343
MeSH Terms: Child, Preschool, Early Diagnosis, Female, Humans, Infant, Male, Minimally Invasive Surgical Procedures, Neoadjuvant Therapy, Neoplasms, Germ Cell and Embryonal, Neuroblastoma, Registries, Tennessee, Tomography, X-Ray Computed, Treatment Outcome, Ultrasonography, Prenatal
Show Abstract · Added November 30, 2020
BACKGROUND - Embryonal tumors arise typically in infants and young children and are often massive at presentation. Operative resection is a cornerstone in the multimodal treatment of embryonal tumors but potentially disrupts therapeutic timelines. When used appropriately, minimally invasive surgery can minimize treatment delays. The oncologic integrity and safety attainable with minimally invasive resection of embryonal tumors, however, remains controversial.
METHODS - Query of the Vanderbilt Cancer Registry identified all children treated for intracavitary, embryonal tumors during a 15-year period. Tumors were assessed radiographically to measure volume (mL) and image-defined risk factors (neuroblastic tumors only) at time of diagnosis, and at preresection and postresection. Patient and tumor characteristics, perioperative details, and oncologic outcomes were compared between minimally invasive surgery and open resection of tumors of comparable size.
RESULTS - A total of 202 patients were treated for 206 intracavitary embryonal tumors, of which 178 were resected either open (n = 152, 85%) or with minimally invasive surgery (n = 26, 15%). The 5-year, relapse-free, and overall survival were not significantly different after minimally invasive surgery or open resection of tumors having a volume less than 100 mL, corresponding to the largest resected with minimally invasive surgery (P = .249 and P = .124, respectively). No difference in margin status or lymph node sampling between the 2 operative approaches was detected (p = .333 and p = .070, respectively). Advantages associated with minimally invasive surgery were decreased blood loss (P < .001), decreased operating time (P = .002), and shorter hospital stay (P < .001). Characteristically, minimally invasive surgery was used for smaller volume and earlier stage neuroblastic tumors without image-defined risk factors.
CONCLUSION - When selected appropriately, minimally invasive resection of pediatric embryonal tumors, particularly neuroblastic tumors, provides acceptable oncologic integrity. Large tumor volume, small patient size, and image-defined risk factors may limit the broader applicability of minimally invasive surgery.
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
MeSH Terms
Twenty-five-year trajectories of insulin resistance and pancreatic β-cell response and diabetes risk in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.
VanWagner LB, Ning H, Allen NB, Siddique J, Carson AP, Bancks MP, Lewis CE, Carr JJ, Speliotes E, Terrault NA, Rinella ME, Vos MB, Lloyd-Jones DM
(2018) Liver Int 38: 2069-2081
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Blood Glucose, Body Mass Index, Diabetes Mellitus, Female, Humans, Insulin Resistance, Insulin-Secreting Cells, Logistic Models, Longitudinal Studies, Male, Multivariate Analysis, Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease, Prevalence, Prospective Studies, Risk Factors, Tomography, X-Ray Computed, United States, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added January 10, 2020
BACKGROUND & AIMS - Insulin resistance is a risk marker for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and a risk factor for liver disease progression. We assessed temporal trajectories of insulin resistance and β-cell response to serum glucose concentration throughout adulthood and their association with diabetes risk in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.
METHODS - Three thousand and sixty participants from Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults, a prospective bi-racial cohort of adults age 18-30 years at baseline (1985-1986; Y0) who completed up to 5 exams over 25 years and had fasting insulin and glucose measurement were included. At Y25 (2010-2011), non-alcoholic fatty liver disease was assessed by noncontrast computed tomography after exclusion of other liver fat causes. Latent mixture modelling identified 25-year trajectories in homeostatic model assessment insulin resistance and β-cell response homeostatic model assessment-β.
RESULTS - Three distinct trajectories were identified, separately, for homeostatic model assessment insulin resistance (low-stable [47%]; moderate-increasing [42%]; and high-increasing [12%]) and homeostatic model assessment-β (low-decreasing [16%]; moderate-decreasing [63%]; and high-decreasing [21%]). Y25 non-alcoholic fatty liver disease prevalence was 24.5%. Among non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, high-increasing homeostatic model assessment insulin resistance (referent: low-stable) was associated with greater prevalent (OR 95% CI = 8.0, 2.0-31.9) and incident (OR = 10.5, 2.6-32.8) diabetes after multivariable adjustment including Y0 or Y25 homeostatic model assessment insulin resistance. In contrast, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease participants with low-decreasing homeostatic model assessment-β (referent: high-decreasing) had the highest odds of prevalent (OR = 14.1, 3.9-50.9) and incident (OR = 10.3, 2.7-39.3) diabetes.
CONCLUSION - Trajectories of insulin resistance and β-cell response during young and middle adulthood are robustly associated with diabetes risk in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Thus, how persons with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease develop resistance to insulin provides important information about risk of diabetes in midlife above and beyond degree of insulin resistance at the time of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease assessment.
© 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
MeSH Terms
Response.
Self WH, Upchurch CP, Wunderink RG, Waterer GW, Grijalva CG, Edwards KM
(2018) Chest 153: 763-764
MeSH Terms: Community-Acquired Infections, Humans, Pneumonia, Radiography, Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Added July 27, 2018
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
5 MeSH Terms