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Racial/ethnic differences in treatment discussed, preferred, and received for prostate cancer in a tri-ethnic population.
Hosain GM, Sanderson M, Du XL, Chan W, Strom SS
(2012) Am J Mens Health 6: 249-57
MeSH Terms: African Americans, Age Factors, Aged, Decision Making, European Continental Ancestry Group, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Interviews as Topic, Male, Middle Aged, Odds Ratio, Patient Care Planning, Patient Preference, Professional-Patient Relations, Prostatectomy, Prostatic Neoplasms, Radiotherapy, Texas, Watchful Waiting
Show Abstract · Added March 11, 2014
This study was conducted to explore whether racial/ethnic differences exist in treatment discussed, preferred, and ultimately received for localized prostate cancer (PCa) as epidemiological data are scant on this issue. The authors recruited 640 localized PCa patients from the Texas Medical Center, Houston, Texas, between 1996 and 2004. The authors used a structured questionnaire to collect data through personal interviews. Three main treatment modalities for localized PCa, consisting of surgery, radiation therapy, and watchful waiting, were considered for this study. It was found that health professionals were less likely to discuss surgery (odds ratio [OR] = 0.35, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.18-0.68) and watchful waiting (OR = 0.53, 95% CI = 0.34-0.83) with Hispanics than Whites. However, African Americans were less likely to receive watchful waiting (OR = 0.22, 95% CI = 0.05-0.93). They were more likely to prefer (OR = 1.23, 95% CI = 0.78-1.94) and receive (OR = 1.27, 95% CI = 0.87-1.86) radiation therapy, although they did not achieve statistical significance (p < .05). Higher age was associated with lower likelihood of discussing, preferring, and receiving surgical treatment. Higher Gleason sum was associated with lower likelihood of discussing treatment. A comparison of concordances between treatment preferred by patients and what was actually received, in general, showed a higher agreement for surgery and radiation therapy. More exploration needs to be done in other settings to confirm these findings.
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19 MeSH Terms
Body mass index and dietary intake among Head Start children and caregivers.
Acharya K, Feese M, Franklin F, Kabagambe EK
(2011) J Am Diet Assoc 111: 1314-21
MeSH Terms: Adult, African Americans, Alabama, Body Mass Index, Caregivers, Child, Preschool, Cross-Sectional Studies, Diet, Early Intervention (Education), European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Fruit, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Male, Obesity, Texas
Show Abstract · Added April 23, 2015
BACKGROUND - The US Head Start program serves low-income preschoolers and their caregivers and provides an opportunity for assessment and intervention on obesity. We sought to determine the prevalence of obesity among children and their caregivers and to identify variables that are associated with child body mass index (BMI) z scores and caregiver BMI.
DESIGN/SETTING - Cross-sectional data on diet and BMI from 770 caregiver-child dyads recruited from 57 Head Start centers in Alabama and Texas.
METHODS - Height and weight of each caregiver and child were measured using standardized protocols. Dietary intakes of caregiver-child dyads were collected using three 24-hour dietary recalls and Block food frequency questionnaires. Data were collected between September 2004 and November 2005. The larger Food Pyramid categories were divided into 17 food consumption groups and tested for their association with child BMI z scores. Analysis of variance was used to test if food groups were significantly associated with child BMI z score.
RESULTS - The prevalence of obesity among children was 18.4%, 24.3%, and 37.3% among black, Hispanic, and white children, respectively (P<0.0001), whereas it was 58.3%, 41.4%, and 41.6% among black, Hispanic, and white caregivers, respectively (P<0.0001). Child BMI z scores and caregiver BMIs were correlated (r=0.16, P<0.0001). In multivariable models, children were 1.90 (95% confidence interval 1.31-2.74) times more likely to have BMI ≥95th percentile if their caregiver was obese. Five variables (fruits, unsweetened beverages, low-fat dairy, race, and caregiver's BMI) were significantly associated with child BMI z scores. Fruits were inversely related, whereas unsweetened beverages, low-fat dairy, and caregiver's BMI were positively associated with child BMI z score (P<0.03). Compared to whites, black and Hispanic children had lower BMI z scores (P<0.05).
CONCLUSIONS - The high prevalence of obesity in this population together with the observed inverse association between fruit consumption and BMI, if replicated in other studies, suggests that interventions that promote fruit consumption could have beneficial effects on child BMI.
Copyright © 2011 American Dietetic Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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17 MeSH Terms
Genome-wide association and meta-analysis in populations from Starr County, Texas, and Mexico City identify type 2 diabetes susceptibility loci and enrichment for expression quantitative trait loci in top signals.
Below JE, Gamazon ER, Morrison JV, Konkashbaev A, Pluzhnikov A, McKeigue PM, Parra EJ, Elbein SC, Hallman DM, Nicolae DL, Bell GI, Cruz M, Cox NJ, Hanis CL
(2011) Diabetologia 54: 2047-55
MeSH Terms: Adult, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Female, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Genome-Wide Association Study, Humans, Male, Mexico, Middle Aged, Quantitative Trait Loci, Texas
Show Abstract · Added February 22, 2016
AIMS/HYPOTHESIS - We conducted genome-wide association studies (GWASs) and expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) analyses to identify and characterise risk loci for type 2 diabetes in Mexican-Americans from Starr County, TX, USA.
METHOD - Using 1.8 million directly interrogated and imputed genotypes in 837 unrelated type 2 diabetes cases and 436 normoglycaemic controls, we conducted Armitage trend tests. To improve power in this population with high disease rates, we also performed ordinal regression including an intermediate class with impaired fasting glucose and/or glucose tolerance. These analyses were followed by meta-analysis with a study of 967 type 2 diabetes cases and 343 normoglycaemic controls from Mexico City, Mexico.
RESULT - The top signals (unadjusted p value <1 × 10(-5)) included 49 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in eight gene regions (PER3, PARD3B, EPHA4, TOMM7, PTPRD, HNT [also known as RREB1], LOC729993 and IL34) and six intergenic regions. Among these was a missense polymorphism (rs10462020; Gly639Val) in the clock gene PER3, a system recently implicated in diabetes. We also report a second signal (minimum p value 1.52 × 10(-6)) within PTPRD, independent of the previously implicated SNP, in a population of Han Chinese. Top meta-analysis signals included known regions HNF1A and KCNQ1. Annotation of top association signals in both studies revealed a marked excess of trans-acting eQTL in both adipose and muscle tissues.
CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION - In the largest study of type 2 diabetes in Mexican populations to date, we identified modest associations of novel and previously reported SNPs. In addition, in our top signals we report significant excess of SNPs that predict transcript levels in muscle and adipose tissues.
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11 MeSH Terms
Genome-wide association study of type 2 diabetes in a sample from Mexico City and a meta-analysis of a Mexican-American sample from Starr County, Texas.
Parra EJ, Below JE, Krithika S, Valladares A, Barta JL, Cox NJ, Hanis CL, Wacher N, Garcia-Mena J, Hu P, Shriver MD, Diabetes Genetics Replication and Meta-analysis (DIAGRAM) Consortium, Kumate J, McKeigue PM, Escobedo J, Cruz M
(2011) Diabetologia 54: 2038-46
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Female, Genome-Wide Association Study, Genotype, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Male, Mexican Americans, Mexico, Middle Aged, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Texas, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added February 22, 2016
AIMS/HYPOTHESIS - We report a genome-wide association study of type 2 diabetes in an admixed sample from Mexico City and describe the results of a meta-analysis of this study and another genome-wide scan in a Mexican-American sample from Starr County, TX, USA. The top signals observed in this meta-analysis were followed up in the Diabetes Genetics Replication and Meta-analysis Consortium (DIAGRAM) and DIAGRAM+ datasets.
METHODS - We analysed 967 cases and 343 normoglycaemic controls. The samples were genotyped with the Affymetrix Genome-wide Human SNP array 5.0. Associations of genotyped and imputed markers with type 2 diabetes were tested using a missing data likelihood score test. A fixed-effects meta-analysis including 1,804 cases and 780 normoglycaemic controls was carried out by weighting the effect estimates by their inverse variances.
RESULTS - In the meta-analysis of the two Hispanic studies, markers showing suggestive associations (p < 10(-5)) were identified in two known diabetes genes, HNF1A and KCNQ1, as well as in several additional regions. Meta-analysis of the two Hispanic studies and the recent DIAGRAM+ dataset identified genome-wide significant signals (p < 5 × 10(-8)) within or near the genes HNF1A and CDKN2A/CDKN2B, as well as suggestive associations in three additional regions, IGF2BP2, KCNQ1 and the previously unreported C14orf70.
CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION - We observed numerous regions with suggestive associations with type 2 diabetes. Some of these signals correspond to regions described in previous studies. However, many of these regions could not be replicated in the DIAGRAM datasets. It is critical to carry out additional studies in Hispanic and American Indian populations, which have a high prevalence of type 2 diabetes.
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15 MeSH Terms
Racial/ethnic differences in predictors of PSA screening in a tri-ethnic population.
Hosain GM, Sanderson M, Du XL, Chan W, Strom SS
(2011) Cent Eur J Public Health 19: 30-4
MeSH Terms: Adult, African Americans, Aged, Continental Population Groups, Cross-Sectional Studies, Early Detection of Cancer, Ethnic Groups, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Health Behavior, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Life Style, Middle Aged, Prostate-Specific Antigen, Socioeconomic Factors, Texas
Show Abstract · Added March 11, 2014
BACKGROUND - This study was carried out to identify racial/ethnic differences in predictors of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening in a group of prostate cancer patients.
METHODS - In this cross-sectional study, a total of 935 prostate cancer patients were recruited from the Texas Medical Center, Houston, between 1996 and 2004. It included 372 Caucasians, 346 African Americans and 217 Hispanics. A structured questionnaire was used to collect data on socio-demographic and life-style related variables, and self-reported PSA screening history through personal interview.
RESULTS - African American (54.4%) and Hispanic patients (42.3%) were significantly less likely (p = 0.004 and p < 0.001, respectively) to report having had PSA screening than Caucasian patients (63.2%). Only annual check-up was found to be a significant predictor of PSA screening in Hispanics. Among Caucasians, education and annual check-up were significant predictors of PSA screening; whereas in African Americans, education, annual check-up, marital status and BMI were significant predictors of PSA screening.
CONCLUSIONS - The rates of PSAscreening and its predictors varied by race/ethnicity in this tri-ethnic population. Health-education programs and culturally appropriate educational outreach efforts, especially targeted for high-risk groups, are needed to reduce these disparities.
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17 MeSH Terms
Automated symptom alerts reduce postoperative symptom severity after cancer surgery: a randomized controlled clinical trial.
Cleeland CS, Wang XS, Shi Q, Mendoza TR, Wright SL, Berry MD, Malveaux D, Shah PK, Gning I, Hofstetter WL, Putnam JB, Vaporciyan AA
(2011) J Clin Oncol 29: 994-1000
MeSH Terms: Aged, Decision Support Systems, Clinical, Dyspnea, Electronic Mail, Female, Humans, Lung Neoplasms, Male, Middle Aged, Pain, Postoperative, Patient Discharge, Postoperative Care, Postoperative Complications, Reminder Systems, Self Report, Severity of Illness Index, Sleep Wake Disorders, Surveys and Questionnaires, Telemedicine, Telephone, Texas, Thoracotomy, Time Factors, Treatment Outcome
Show Abstract · Added March 27, 2014
PURPOSE - Patients receiving cancer-related thoracotomy are highly symptomatic in the first weeks after surgery. This study examined whether at-home symptom monitoring plus feedback to clinicians about severe symptoms contributes to more effective postoperative symptom control.
PATIENTS AND METHODS - We enrolled 100 patients receiving thoracotomy for lung cancer or lung metastasis in a two-arm randomized controlled trial; 79 patients completed the study. After hospital discharge, patients rated symptoms twice weekly for 4 weeks via automated telephone calls. For intervention group patients, an e-mail alert was forwarded to the patient's clinical team for response if any of a subset of symptoms (pain, disturbed sleep, distress, shortness of breath, or constipation) reached a predetermined severity threshold. No alerts were generated for controls. Group differences in symptom threshold events were examined by generalized estimating equation modeling.
RESULTS - The intervention group experienced greater reduction in symptom threshold events than did controls (19% v 8%, respectively) and a more rapid decline in symptom threshold events. The difference in average reduction in symptom interference between groups was -0.36 (SE, 0.078; P = .02). Clinicians responded to 84% of e-mail alerts. Both groups reported equally high satisfaction with the automated system and with postoperative symptom control.
CONCLUSION - Frequent symptom monitoring with alerts to clinicians when symptoms became moderate or severe reduced symptom severity during the 4 weeks after thoracic surgery. Methods of automated symptom monitoring and triage may improve symptom control after major cancer surgery. These results should be confirmed in a larger study.
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24 MeSH Terms
Evaluation of a breastfeeding peer support program for fathers of Hispanic participants in a Texas special supplemental nutrition program for women, infants, and children.
Lovera D, Sanderson M, Bogle ML, Vela Acosta MS
(2010) J Am Diet Assoc 110: 1696-702
MeSH Terms: Adult, Breast Feeding, Cohort Studies, Fathers, Female, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Infant, Logistic Models, Male, Peer Group, Pilot Projects, Program Evaluation, Public Assistance, Sample Size, Social Support, Texas, Time Factors
Show Abstract · Added March 11, 2014
A mother's decision to breastfeed and the duration of breastfeeding depends on different factors; among them are the support of her husband or male partner and other social support. There have been different types of support programs for mothers and few have targeted fathers. In 2002, the Texas Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children introduced an innovative approach for encouraging breastfeeding among mothers and their spouses. The pilot Peer Dad Program targeted fathers to promote and support their spouse in breastfeeding. This cohort study evaluated duration of breastfeeding among Hispanic couples who enrolled in the pilot Peer Dad Program (n=101) and those who did not enroll (n=99). Structured interviews were conducted with Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children participants and their male partners. Unconditional logistic regression was used to estimate the likelihood of continuing breastfeeding past 6 months associated with participation in the Peer Dad Program and significant predictors. Mothers whose partner participated in the pilot Peer Dad Program were no more likely to continue breastfeeding past 6 months (odds ratio 1.44, 95% confidence interval 0.82 to 2.54) compared with mothers who received peer counseling only. The percentage of women in the intervention group (63.4%) who breastfed for 6 months or longer compared with women in the control group (54.6%) was not significant (P=0.20). Although other studies suggest that father's support lengthens breastfeeding duration, our study, which targeted Hispanic fathers, found no association due to its small sample size. Further research with larger studies is needed to establish this association.
Copyright © 2010 American Dietetic Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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18 MeSH Terms
Diabetes, physical activity and breast cancer among Hispanic women.
Sanderson M, Peltz G, Perez A, Johnson M, Vernon SW, Fernandez ME, Fadden MK
(2010) Cancer Epidemiol 34: 556-61
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Breast Neoplasms, Case-Control Studies, Diabetes Mellitus, Female, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Mexico, Middle Aged, Motor Activity, Risk Factors, Texas
Show Abstract · Added March 11, 2014
PURPOSE - We assessed the association between diabetes and breast cancer and whether physical activity modified the effect of diabetes on breast cancer in Hispanic women.
METHODS - We used data from a case-control study of breast cancer among Hispanic women aged 30-79 conducted between 2003 and 2008 on the Texas-Mexico border. In-person interviews were completed with 190 incident breast cancer cases ascertained through surgeons and oncologists, and 979 controls who were designated as both high-risk (n=511) and low-risk (N=468) for breast cancer (with respective response rates of 97%, 83% and 74%).
RESULTS - After adjustment for menopausal status and mammography screening, there was no effect of diabetes on breast cancer risk (high-risk control group odds ratio [OR] 1.02, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.71-1.48; low-risk control group OR 0.87, 0.58-1.30). Women who had a diabetes history and did not exercise were at no risk of breast cancer (OR 0.96, 95% CI 0.63-1.48) or a slightly reduced breast cancer risk (low-risk control group OR 0.72, 95% CI 0.46-1.15) depending on the control group used, while women with diabetes who did exercise had significantly reduced breast cancer risk (OR 0.41, 95% CI 0.21-0.83) regardless of the control group used (high-risk control group p-value for interaction=0.013, low-risk control group p-value for interaction 0.183).
CONCLUSIONS - Should other studies confirm our results, physical activity should be explored as a means of reducing breast cancer risk in diabetic women.
Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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13 MeSH Terms
Disturbed sleep among adolescents living in 2 communities on the Texas-Mexico border, 2000-2003.
Pérez A, Roberts RE, Sanderson M, Reininger B, Aguirre-Flores MI
(2010) Prev Chronic Dis 7: A40
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Female, Health Surveys, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Male, Mexico, Prevalence, Sleep Wake Disorders, Texas
Show Abstract · Added March 11, 2014
INTRODUCTION - Disturbed sleep is a public health problem, but few studies describe the prevalence of sleep problems among Hispanic adolescents. We estimated the prevalence of disturbed sleep and associated factors among ninth graders living on the Texas-Mexico border.
METHODS - We used probabilistic sampling to conduct 2 cross-sectional, school-based surveys: 1 during the 2000-2001 school year in the Lower Rio Grande Valley, Texas (n = 4,901), and 1 during the 2002-2003 school year in Matamoros, Tamaulipas, Mexico (n = 669). We assessed disturbed sleep during the 4 weeks before the survey.
RESULTS - The prevalence of disturbed sleep in Matamoros was 36% and in the Lower Rio Grande Valley was 28%. Factors associated with disturbed sleep in both populations were smoking cigarettes, having ever used cocaine, having been forced to have sex, considering attempting suicide, feeling sad, and going without eating for 24 hours or more.
CONCLUSION - This study revealed a high prevalence of disturbed sleep in high school students living on the Texas-Mexico border. This public health issue should be further investigated in both communities.
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10 MeSH Terms
HPV knowledge, attitudes, and cultural beliefs among Hispanic men and women living on the Texas-Mexico border.
Fernandez ME, McCurdy SA, Arvey SR, Tyson SK, Morales-Campos D, Flores B, Useche B, Mitchell-Bennett L, Sanderson M
(2009) Ethn Health 14: 607-24
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Culture, Female, Focus Groups, Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice, Humans, Male, Masculinity, Mexico, Middle Aged, Papillomaviridae, Papillomavirus Infections, Texas, Uterine Cervical Neoplasms, Vaginal Smears, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added March 11, 2014
BACKGROUND - US Hispanic women have higher cervical cancer incidence rates than non-Hispanic White and African-American women and lower rates of cervical cancer screening. Knowledge, attitudes, and cultural beliefs may play a role in higher rates of infection of human papillomavirus (HPV) and decisions about subsequent diagnosis and treatment of cervical cancer.
STUDY AIM - To explore the level of HPV knowledge, attitudes, and cultural beliefs among Hispanic men and women on the Texas-Mexico border.
METHODOLOGICAL APPROACH - Informed by feminist ethnography, the authors used an interpretive approach to understand local respondents' concerns and interests. Focus group sessions were analyzed using thematic content analysis. RECRUITMENT AND SAMPLE: Promotoras (lay health workers) recruited participants using convenience sampling methods. Group sessions were held in public service centers in Brownsville. Participants' ages ranged from 19 to 76 years. METHODS ANALYSIS: Focus group discussions were audio-recorded and transcribed in Spanish. Researchers read and discussed all the transcripts and generated a coding list. Transcripts were coded using ATLAS.ti 5.0.
KEY FINDINGS - Participants had little understanding about HPV and its role in the etiology of cervical cancer. Attitudes and concerns differed by gender. Women interpreted a diagnosis of HPV as a diagnosis of cancer and expressed fatalistic beliefs about its treatment. Men initially interpreted a diagnosis of HPV as an indication of their partners' infidelity, but after reflecting upon the ambiguity of HPV transmission, attributed their initial reaction to cultural ideals of machismo. Men ultimately were interested in helping their partners seek care in the event of a positive diagnosis.
IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE - Results suggest that understanding Hispanics' cultural norms and values concerning disease, sexuality, and gender is essential to the design and implementation of interventions to prevent and treat HPV and cervical cancer.
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17 MeSH Terms