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A Bayesian Double Fusion Model for Resting-State Brain Connectivity Using Joint Functional and Structural Data.
Kang H, Ombao H, Fonnesbeck C, Ding Z, Morgan VL
(2017) Brain Connect 7: 219-227
MeSH Terms: Adult, Bayes Theorem, Brain, Diffusion Tensor Imaging, Epilepsy, Temporal Lobe, Female, Functional Neuroimaging, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Middle Aged, Neural Pathways, Spatio-Temporal Analysis, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added April 6, 2017
Current approaches separately analyze concurrently acquired diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data. The primary limitation of these approaches is that they do not take advantage of the information from DTI that could potentially enhance estimation of resting-state functional connectivity (FC) between brain regions. To overcome this limitation, we develop a Bayesian hierarchical spatiotemporal model that incorporates structural connectivity (SC) into estimating FC. In our proposed approach, SC based on DTI data is used to construct an informative prior for FC based on resting-state fMRI data through the Cholesky decomposition. Simulation studies showed that incorporating the two data produced significantly reduced mean squared errors compared to the standard approach of separately analyzing the two data from different modalities. We applied our model to analyze the resting state DTI and fMRI data collected to estimate FC between the brain regions that were hypothetically important in the origination and spread of temporal lobe epilepsy seizures. Our analysis concludes that the proposed model achieves smaller false positive rates and is much robust to data decimation compared to the conventional approach.
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14 MeSH Terms
Temporal lobe origin is common in patients who have undergone epilepsy surgery for hypermotor seizures.
Arain AM, Azar NJ, Lagrange AH, McLean M, Singh P, Sonmezturk H, Konrad P, Neimat J, Abou-Khalil B
(2016) Epilepsy Behav 64: 57-61
MeSH Terms: Adult, Electroencephalography, Epilepsy, Female, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Positron-Emission Tomography, Seizures, Temporal Lobe, Treatment Outcome, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
RATIONALE - Hypermotor seizures are most often reported from the frontal lobe but may also have temporal, parietal, or insular origin. We noted a higher proportion of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy in our surgical cohort who had hypermotor seizures. We evaluated the anatomic localization and surgical outcome in patient with refractory hypermotor seizures who had epilepsy surgery in our center.
METHODS - We identified twenty three patients with refractory hypermotor seizures from our epilepsy surgery database. We analyzed demographics, presurgical evaluation including semiology, MRI, PET scan, interictal/ictal scalp video-EEG, intracranial recording, and surgical outcomes. We evaluated preoperative variables as predictors of outcome.
RESULTS - Most patients (65%) had normal brain MRI. Intracranial EEG was required in 20 patients (86.9%). Based on the presurgical evaluation, the resection was anterior temporal in fourteen patients, orbitofrontal in four patients, cingulate in four patients, and temporoparietal in one patient. The median duration of follow-up after surgery was 76.4months. Fourteen patients (60%) had been seizure free at the last follow up while 3 patients had rare disabling seizures.
CONCLUSIONS - Hypermotor seizures often originated from the temporal lobe in this series of patients who had epilepsy surgery. This large proportion of temporal lobe epilepsy may be the result of a selection bias, due to easier localization and expected better outcome in temporal lobe epilepsy. With extensive presurgical evaluation, including intracranial EEG when needed, seizure freedom can be expected in the majority of patients.
Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.
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12 MeSH Terms
Increased MRI volumetric correlation contralateral to seizure focus in temporal lobe epilepsy.
Conrad BN, Rogers BP, Abou-Khalil B, Morgan VL
(2016) Epilepsy Res 126: 53-61
MeSH Terms: Adult, Cohort Studies, Drug Resistant Epilepsy, Epilepsy, Temporal Lobe, Female, Functional Laterality, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Neural Pathways, Organ Size, Seizures
Show Abstract · Added March 16, 2018
Quantification of volumetric correlation may be sensitive to disease alterations undetected by standard voxel based morphometry (VBM) such as subtle, synchronous alterations in regional volumes, and may provide complementary evidence of the structural impact of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) on the brain. The purpose of this study was to quantify differences of regional volumetric correlation in right (RTLE) and left (LTLE) TLE patients compared to healthy controls. A T1 weighted 3T MRI was acquired (1mm(3)) in 44 drug resistant unilateral TLE patients (n=26 RTLE, n=18 LTLE) and 44 individually age and gender matched healthy controls. Images were processed using a standard VBM framework and volumetric correlation was calculated across subjects in 90 regions and compared between patients and controls. Results were summarized across hemispheres and region groups. There was increased correlation involving the contralateral homologues of the seizure foci/network in the limbic, subcortical and temporal regions in both RTLE and LTLE. Outside these regions, results implied widespread correlated alterations across several contralateral lobes in LTLE, with more focal changes in RTLE. These findings complement previous volumetric studies in TLE describing more ipsilateral atrophy, by revealing subtle coordinated volumetric changes to identify a more widespread effect of TLE across the brain.
Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
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12 MeSH Terms
APOE ε4 associated with preserved executive function performance and maintenance of temporal and cingulate brain volumes in younger adults.
Taylor WD, Boyd B, Turner R, McQuoid DR, Ashley-Koch A, MacFall JR, Saleh A, Potter GG
(2017) Brain Imaging Behav 11: 194-204
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aging, Apolipoprotein E4, Depression, Executive Function, Female, Gyrus Cinguli, Heterozygote, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Middle Aged, Neuropsychological Tests, Organ Size, Temporal Lobe, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added February 22, 2016
The APOE ε4 allele is associated with cognitive deficits and brain atrophy in older adults, but studies in younger adults are mixed. We examined APOE genotype effects on cognition and brain structure in younger adults and whether genotype effects differed by age and with presence of depression. 157 adults (32 % ε4 carriers, 46 % depressed) between 20 and 50 years of age completed neuropsychological testing, 131 of which also completed 3 T cranial MRI. We did not observe a direct effect of APOE genotype on cognitive performance or structural MRI measures. A significant genotype by age interaction was observed for executive function, where age had less of an effect on executive function in ε4 carriers. Similar interactions were observed for the entorhinal cortex, rostral and caudal anterior cingulate cortex and parahippocampal gyrus, where the effect of age on regional volumes was reduced in ε4 carriers. There were no significant interactions between APOE genotype and depression diagnosis. The ε4 allele benefits younger adults by allowing them to maintain executive function performance and volumes of cingulate and temporal cortex regions with aging, at least through age fifty years.
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16 MeSH Terms
The reliability of individual differences in face-selective responses in the fusiform gyrus and their relation to face recognition ability.
McGugin RW, Gauthier I
(2016) Brain Imaging Behav 10: 707-18
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Brain Mapping, Facial Recognition, Female, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Neuropsychological Tests, Reproducibility of Results, Temporal Lobe, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added February 23, 2016
Face recognition ability varies widely in the normal population and there is increasing interest in linking individual differences in perception to their neural correlates. Such brain-behavior correlations require that both the behavioral measures and the selective BOLD responses be reliable. The reliability of the location of the fusiform face area (FFA) has been demonstrated in several studies. Here, we address reliability of a different kind: reliability of the magnitude of responses to faces within this localized region. We calculated split-half reliability of face-selective responses within functionally defined posterior and anterior face-selective patches in the fusiform gyrus (FFA1/FFA2). We used data from two published studies that included both a functional localizer for face-selective regions and independent data suitable for quantifying face-selectivity. We found highly reliable face selectivity in both hemispheres that was highest in the centermost voxel(s) compared to larger regions of interest. Differences in face-selectivity between the two face patches within one hemisphere and across hemispheres were also reliable. Our results reveal considerable reliability of face-selective signals in and across FFA in adults. Given the good reliability of behavioral measures of face recognition, prior failures to find a relationship between the mean response to faces in FFA and behavioral face recognition in normal adult subjects are unlikely to be due to limitations of the measurements.
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12 MeSH Terms
Decoding Episodic Retrieval Processes: Frontoparietal and Medial Temporal Lobe Contributions to Free Recall.
Kragel JE, Polyn SM
(2016) J Cogn Neurosci 28: 125-39
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Brain Mapping, Female, Humans, Image Processing, Computer-Assisted, Linear Models, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Memory, Episodic, Mental Recall, Oxygen, Photic Stimulation, Reaction Time, Recognition, Psychology, Temporal Lobe, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added February 16, 2016
Neuroimaging studies of recognition memory have identified distinct patterns of cortical activity associated with two sets of cognitive processes: Recollective processes supporting retrieval of information specifying a probe item's original source are associated with the posterior hippocampus, ventral posterior parietal cortex, and medial pFC. Familiarity processes supporting the correct identification of previously studied probes (in the absence of a recollective response) are associated with activity in anterior medial temporal lobe (MTL) structures including the perirhinal cortex and anterior hippocampus, in addition to lateral prefrontal and dorsal posterior parietal cortex. Here, we address an open question in the cognitive neuroscientific literature: To what extent are these same neurocognitive processes engaged during an internally directed memory search task like free recall? We recorded fMRI activity while participants performed a series of free recall and source recognition trials, and we used a combination of univariate and multivariate analysis techniques to compare neural activation profiles across the two tasks. Univariate analyses showed that posterior MTL regions were commonly associated with recollective processes during source recognition and with free recall responses. Prefrontal and posterior parietal regions were commonly associated with familiarity processes and free recall responses, whereas anterior MTL regions were only associated with familiarity processes during recognition. In contrast with the univariate results, free recall activity patterns characterized using multivariate pattern analysis did not reliably match the neural patterns associated with recollective processes. However, these free recall patterns did reliably match patterns associated with familiarity processes, supporting theories of memory in which common cognitive mechanisms support both item recognition and free recall.
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17 MeSH Terms
Segmentation of the thalamus based on BOLD frequencies affected in temporal lobe epilepsy.
Morgan VL, Rogers BP, Abou-Khalil B
(2015) Epilepsia 56: 1819-27
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Epilepsy, Temporal Lobe, Female, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Middle Aged, Nerve Net, Thalamus, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added February 17, 2016
OBJECTIVE - Temporal lobe epilepsy is associated with functional changes throughout the brain, particularly including a putative seizure propagation network involving the hippocampus, insula, and thalamus. We identified a specified frequency range where functional connectivity in this network was related to duration of disease. Then, to identify specific thalamic nuclei involved in seizure propagation, we determined the subregions of the thalamus that have increased resting functional oscillations in this frequency range.
METHODS - Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was acquired from 20 patients with unilateral temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE; 14 right and 6 left) and 20 healthy controls who were each age and gender matched to a specific patient. Wavelet-based fMRI connectivity mapping across the network was computed at each frequency to determine those frequencies where connectivity significantly decreases with duration of disease consistent with impairment due to repeated seizures. The voxel-wise power of the spontaneous blood oxygenation fluctuations of this frequency band was computed in the thalamus of each subject.
RESULTS - Functional connectivity was impaired in the proposed seizure propagation network over a specific range (0.0067-0.013 Hz and 0.024-0.032 Hz) of blood oxygenation oscillations. Increased power in this frequency band (<0.032 Hz) was detected bilaterally in the pulvinar and anterior nucleus of the thalamus of healthy controls, and was increased over the ipsilateral thalamus compared to the contralateral thalamus in TLE.
SIGNIFICANCE - This study identified frequencies of impaired connectivity in a TLE seizure propagation network and used them to localize the anterior nucleus and pulvinar of the thalamus as subregions most susceptible to TLE seizures. Further examinations of these frequencies in healthy and TLE subjects may provide unique information relating to the mechanism of seizure propagation and potential treatment using electrical stimulation.
Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 International League Against Epilepsy.
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12 MeSH Terms
Minimally invasive surgical approaches for temporal lobe epilepsy.
Chang EF, Englot DJ, Vadera S
(2015) Epilepsy Behav 47: 24-33
MeSH Terms: Amygdala, Anterior Temporal Lobectomy, Cerebral Cortex, Deep Brain Stimulation, Epilepsy, Epilepsy, Temporal Lobe, Humans, Imaging, Three-Dimensional, Male, Middle Aged, Neurosurgical Procedures, Quality of Life, Radiosurgery, Seizures, Treatment Outcome, Vagus Nerve Stimulation
Show Abstract · Added August 12, 2016
Surgery can be a highly effective treatment for medically refractory temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). The emergence of minimally invasive resective and nonresective treatment options has led to interest in epilepsy surgery among patients and providers. Nevertheless, not all procedures are appropriate for all patients, and it is critical to consider seizure outcomes with each of these approaches, as seizure freedom is the greatest predictor of patient quality of life. Standard anterior temporal lobectomy (ATL) remains the gold standard in the treatment of TLE, with seizure freedom resulting in 60-80% of patients. It is currently the only resective epilepsy surgery supported by randomized controlled trials and offers the best protection against lateral temporal seizure onset. Selective amygdalohippocampectomy techniques preserve the lateral cortex and temporal stem to varying degrees and can result in favorable rates of seizure freedom but the risk of recurrent seizures appears slightly greater than with ATL, and it is not clear whether neuropsychological outcomes are improved with selective approaches. Stereotactic radiosurgery presents an opportunity to avoid surgery altogether, with seizure outcomes now under investigation. Stereotactic laser thermo-ablation allows destruction of the mesial temporal structures with low complication rates and minimal recovery time, and outcomes are also under study. Finally, while neuromodulatory devices such as responsive neurostimulation, vagus nerve stimulation, and deep brain stimulation have a role in the treatment of certain patients, these remain palliative procedures for those who are not candidates for resection or ablation, as complete seizure freedom rates are low. Further development and investigation of both established and novel strategies for the surgical treatment of TLE will be critical moving forward, given the significant burden of this disease.
Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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16 MeSH Terms
Auditory properties in the parabelt regions of the superior temporal gyrus in the awake macaque monkey: an initial survey.
Kajikawa Y, Frey S, Ross D, Falchier A, Hackett TA, Schroeder CE
(2015) J Neurosci 35: 4140-50
MeSH Terms: Acoustic Stimulation, Animals, Auditory Pathways, Auditory Perception, Brain Mapping, Evoked Potentials, Auditory, Female, Functional Laterality, Humans, Image Processing, Computer-Assisted, Macaca mulatta, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Psychoacoustics, Temporal Lobe, Wakefulness
Show Abstract · Added February 22, 2016
The superior temporal gyrus (STG) is on the inferior-lateral brain surface near the external ear. In macaques, 2/3 of the STG is occupied by an auditory cortical region, the "parabelt," which is part of a network of inferior temporal areas subserving communication and social cognition as well as object recognition and other functions. However, due to its location beneath the squamous temporal bone and temporalis muscle, the STG, like other inferior temporal regions, has been a challenging target for physiological studies in awake-behaving macaques. We designed a new procedure for implanting recording chambers to provide direct access to the STG, allowing us to evaluate neuronal properties and their topography across the full extent of the STG in awake-behaving macaques. Initial surveys of the STG have yielded several new findings. Unexpectedly, STG sites in monkeys that were listening passively responded to tones with magnitudes comparable to those of responses to 1/3 octave band-pass noise. Mapping results showed longer response latencies in more rostral sites and possible tonotopic patterns parallel to core and belt areas, suggesting the reversal of gradients between caudal and rostral parabelt areas. These results will help further exploration of parabelt areas.
Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/354140-11$15.00/0.
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16 MeSH Terms
Neural activity in the medial temporal lobe reveals the fidelity of mental time travel.
Kragel JE, Morton NW, Polyn SM
(2015) J Neurosci 35: 2914-26
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Brain Mapping, Female, Humans, Image Processing, Computer-Assisted, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Mental Recall, Models, Neurological, Nerve Net, Neuropsychological Tests, Oxygen, Temporal Lobe, Verbal Learning, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added February 16, 2016
Neural circuitry in the medial temporal lobe (MTL) is critically involved in mental time travel, which involves the vivid retrieval of the details of past experience. Neuroscientific theories propose that the MTL supports memory of the past by retrieving previously encoded episodic information, as well as by reactivating a temporal code specifying the position of a particular event within an episode. However, the neural computations supporting these abilities are underspecified. To test hypotheses regarding the computational mechanisms supported by different MTL subregions during mental time travel, we developed a computational model that linked a blood oxygenation level-dependent signal to cognitive operations, allowing us to predict human performance in a memory search task. Activity in the posterior MTL, including parahippocampal cortex, reflected how strongly one reactivates the temporal context of a retrieved memory, allowing the model to predict whether the next memory will correspond to a nearby moment in the study episode. A signal in the anterior MTL, including perirhinal cortex, indicated the successful retrieval of list items, without providing information regarding temporal organization. A hippocampal signal reflected both processes, consistent with theories that this region binds item and context information together to form episodic memories. These findings provide evidence for modern theories that describe complementary roles of the hippocampus and surrounding parahippocampal and perirhinal cortices during the retrieval of episodic memories, shaping how humans revisit the past.
Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/352914-13$15.00/0.
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16 MeSH Terms