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Results: 11 to 20 of 32

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Understanding velocardiofacial syndrome: how recent discoveries can help you improve your patient outcomes.
Chinnadurai S, Goudy S
(2012) Curr Opin Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 20: 502-6
MeSH Terms: Animals, Branchial Region, Calcium, DiGeorge Syndrome, Genetic Therapy, Homeostasis, Humans, Parathyroid Glands, Phenotype, T-Box Domain Proteins, T-Lymphocytes, Thymus Gland, Tretinoin
Show Abstract · Added May 30, 2014
PURPOSE OF REVIEW - Improved recognition of velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS) has led to increasing awareness of VCFS by otolaryngologists. Understanding the developmental biologic processes affected in VCFS patients will help improve treatment and outcomes. Advanced application of molecular labeling techniques has better outlined the role of T-Box transcription factor 1 (TBX1) as the primary genetic anomaly leading to VCFS. TBX1 plays multiple roles during branchial, cardiac, and craniofacial development and increased understanding of how these systems are affected by TBX1 mutations will improve patient outcomes. Furthermore, additional modifiers of TBX1 expression have been identified that may explain the variability of VCFS phenotypes. The phenotypic spectrum of VCFS may include cardiac anomalies, velopharyngeal insufficiency, aberrant calcium metabolism, and immune dysfunction. Recent interest has focused on the cognitive and neuropsychiatric manifestations of VCFS. Improved understanding of the biology of VCFS associated mutations has the potential to improve therapeutic outcomes.
RECENT FINDINGS - This article will discuss recent developmental biologic understanding of the role of TBX1 and genetic modifiers generating the phenotypic variability seen in VCFS patients. Special attention is given to advances in the realms of immunodeficiency, hypocalcemia, cardiac and arterial patterning anomalies, velopharyngeal insufficiency, as well as cognitive and psychiatric problems.
SUMMARY - Enhanced understanding of the multiple systems affected by TBX1 mutations will result in improved patient outcomes and improved family education. Future research will lead to improved detection of potential targets for gene therapy and change the way physicians counsel families and treat patients.
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13 MeSH Terms
NK cells inhibit T-bet-deficient, autoreactive Th17 cells.
Wu W, Shi S, Ljunggren HG, Cava AL, Van Kaer L, Shi FD, Liu R
(2012) Scand J Immunol 76: 559-66
MeSH Terms: Animals, Autoantigens, Cell Communication, Cell Differentiation, Cells, Cultured, Cytokines, Cytotoxicity, Immunologic, Gene Expression Regulation, Immune Tolerance, Killer Cells, Natural, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Nuclear Receptor Subfamily 1, Group F, Member 3, STAT3 Transcription Factor, T-Box Domain Proteins, Th1 Cells, Th17 Cells
Show Abstract · Added March 20, 2014
The differentiation and maintenance of Th17 cells require a unique cytokine milieu and activation of lineage-specific transcription factors. This process appears to be antagonized by the transcription factor T-bet, which controls the differentiation of Th1 cells. Considering that T-bet-deficient (T-bet(-/-) ) mice are largely devoid of natural killer (NK) cells due to a defect in the terminal maturation of these cells, and because NK cells can influence the differentiation of T helper cells, we investigated whether the absence of NK cells in T-bet-deficient mice contributes to the augmentation of autoreactive Th17 cell responses. We show that the loss of T-bet renders the transcription factors Rorc and STAT3 highly responsive to activation by stimuli provided by NK cells. Furthermore, reconstitution of T-bet(-/-) mice with wild-type NK cells inhibited the development of autoreactive Th17 cells through NK cell-derived production of IFN-γ. These results identify NK cells as critical regulators in the development of autoreactive Th17 cells and Th17-mediated pathology.
© 2012 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Immunology © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
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18 MeSH Terms
Ripply3, a Tbx1 repressor, is required for development of the pharyngeal apparatus and its derivatives in mice.
Okubo T, Kawamura A, Takahashi J, Yagi H, Morishima M, Matsuoka R, Takada S
(2011) Development 138: 339-48
MeSH Terms: Animals, Base Sequence, Branchial Region, Chromosome Deletion, Chromosomes, Human, Pair 22, DNA Primers, Female, Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental, Heart Defects, Congenital, Humans, Male, Mice, Mice, 129 Strain, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Paired Box Transcription Factors, Phenotype, Pregnancy, Repressor Proteins, T-Box Domain Proteins
Show Abstract · Added December 9, 2016
The pharyngeal apparatus is a transient structure that gives rise to the thymus and the parathyroid glands and also contributes to the development of arteries and the cardiac outflow tract. A typical developmental disorder of the pharyngeal apparatus is the 22q11 deletion syndrome (22q11DS), for which Tbx1 is responsible. Here, we show that Ripply3 can modulate Tbx1 activity and plays a role in the development of the pharyngeal apparatus. Ripply3 expression is observed in the pharyngeal ectoderm and endoderm and overlaps with strong expression of Tbx1 in the caudal pharyngeal endoderm. Ripply3 suppresses transcriptional activation by Tbx1 in luciferase assays in vitro. Ripply3-deficient mice exhibit abnormal development of pharyngeal derivatives, including ectopic formation of the thymus and the parathyroid gland, as well as cardiovascular malformation. Corresponding with these defects, Ripply3-deficient embryos show hypotrophy of the caudal pharyngeal apparatus. Ripply3 represses Tbx1-induced expression of Pax9 in luciferase assays in vitro, and Ripply3-deficient embryos exhibit upregulated Pax9 expression. Together, our results show that Ripply3 plays a role in pharyngeal development, probably by regulating Tbx1 activity.
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20 MeSH Terms
Inactivation of Bmp4 from the Tbx1 expression domain causes abnormal pharyngeal arch artery and cardiac outflow tract remodeling.
Nie X, Brown CB, Wang Q, Jiao K
(2011) Cells Tissues Organs 193: 393-403
MeSH Terms: Animals, Aorta, Thoracic, Apoptosis, Arteries, Biomarkers, Bone Morphogenetic Protein 4, Branchial Region, Cardiovascular Abnormalities, Cardiovascular System, Cell Proliferation, DiGeorge Syndrome, Embryo, Mammalian, Embryonic Development, Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental, Gene Silencing, Humans, Integrases, Mice, Penetrance, Phenotype, T-Box Domain Proteins
Show Abstract · Added February 19, 2015
Maldevelopment of outflow tract and aortic arch arteries is among the most common forms of human congenital heart diseases. Both Bmp4 and Tbx1 are known to play critical roles during cardiovascular development. Expression of these two genes partially overlaps in pharyngeal arch areas in mouse embryos. In this study, we applied a conditional gene inactivation approach to test the hypothesis that Bmp4 expressed from the Tbx1 expression domain plays a critical role for normal development of outflow tract and pharyngeal arch arteries. We showed that inactivation of Bmp4 from Tbx1-expressing cells leads to the spectrum of deformities resembling the cardiovascular defects observed in human DiGeorge syndrome patients. Inactivation of Bmp4 from the Tbx1 expression domain did not cause patterning defects, but affected remodeling of outflow tract and pharyngeal arch arteries. Our further examination revealed that Bmp4 is required for normal recruitment/differentiation of smooth muscle cells surrounding the PAA4 and survival of outflow tract cushion mesenchymal cells.
Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.
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21 MeSH Terms
Tbx1 is necessary for palatal elongation and elevation.
Goudy S, Law A, Sanchez G, Baldwin HS, Brown C
(2010) Mech Dev 127: 292-300
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cell Proliferation, Cleft Palate, Fibroblast Growth Factor 10, Fibroblast Growth Factor 8, Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental, Hyaluronic Acid, In Situ Hybridization, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Organ Culture Techniques, Palate, T-Box Domain Proteins, Transforming Growth Factor beta3
Show Abstract · Added May 30, 2014
The transcription factor TBX1 is a key mediator of developmental abnormalities associated with DiGeorge/Velocardiofacial Syndrome. Studies in mice have demonstrated that decreased dosage of Tbx1 results in defects in pharyngeal arch, cardiovascular, and craniofacial development. The role of Tbx1 in cardiac development has been intensely studied; however, its role in palatal development is poorly understood. By studying the Tbx1-/- mice we found defects during the critical points of palate elongation and elevation. The intrinsic palate defects in the Tbx1-/- mice were determined by measuring changes in palate shelf length, proliferation, apoptosis, expression of relevant growth factors, and in palate fusion assays. Tbx1-/- embryos exhibit cleft palate with failed palate elevation in 100% and abnormal palatal-oral fusions in 50%. In the Tbx1-/- mice the palate shelf length was reduced and tongue height was greater, demonstrating a physical impediment to palate elevation and apposition. In vitro palate fusion assays demonstrate that Tbx1-/- palate shelves are capable of fusion but a roller culture assay showed that the null palatal shelves were unable to elongate. Diminished hyaluronic acid production in the Tbx1-/- palate shelves may explain failed palate shelf elevation. In addition, cell proliferation and apoptosis were perturbed in Tbx1-/- palates. A sharp decrease of Fgf8 expression was detected in the Tbx1-/- palate shelves, suggesting that Fgf8 is dependent on Tbx1 in the palate. Fgf10 is also up-regulated in the Tbx1-/- palate shelves and tongue. These data demonstrate that Tbx1 is a critical transcription factor that guides palatal elongation and elevation and that Fgf8 expression in the palate is Tbx1-dependent.
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14 MeSH Terms
Transforming growth factor beta is dispensable for the molecular orchestration of Th17 cell differentiation.
Das J, Ren G, Zhang L, Roberts AI, Zhao X, Bothwell AL, Van Kaer L, Shi Y, Das G
(2009) J Exp Med 206: 2407-16
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cell Differentiation, Cytokines, Encephalomyelitis, Autoimmune, Experimental, GATA3 Transcription Factor, Interleukin-6, Lymphocyte Activation, Mice, Mice, Knockout, STAT4 Transcription Factor, STAT6 Transcription Factor, T-Box Domain Proteins, T-Lymphocytes, Helper-Inducer, Th1 Cells, Th2 Cells, Transforming Growth Factor beta
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
Interleukin (IL)-17-producing T helper (Th17) cells play a critical role in the pathophysiology of several autoimmune disorders. The differentiation of Th17 cells requires the simultaneous presence of an unusual combination of cytokines: IL-6, a proinflammatory cytokine, and transforming growth factor (TGF) beta, an antiinflammatory cytokine. However, the molecular mechanisms by which TGF-beta exerts its effects on Th17 cell differentiation remain elusive. We report that TGF-beta does not directly promote Th17 cell differentiation but instead acts indirectly by blocking expression of the transcription factors signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 4 and GATA-3, thus preventing Th1 and Th2 cell differentiation. In contrast, TGF-beta had no effect on the expression of retinoic acid receptor-related orphan nuclear receptor gammat, a Th17-specific transcription factor. Interestingly, in Stat-6(-/-)T-bet(-/-) mice, which are unable to generate Th1 and Th2 cells, IL-6 alone was sufficient to induce robust differentiation of Th17 cells, whereas TGF-beta had no effect, suggesting that TGF-beta is dispensable for Th17 cell development. Consequently, BALB/c Stat-6(-/-)T-bet(-/-) mice, but not wild-type BALB/c mice, were highly susceptible to the development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, which could be blocked by anti-IL-17 antibodies but not by anti-TGF-beta antibodies. Collectively, these data provide evidence that TGF-beta is not directly required for the molecular orchestration of Th17 cell differentiation.
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16 MeSH Terms
Lack of the mesodermal homeodomain protein MEOX1 disrupts sclerotome polarity and leads to a remodeling of the cranio-cervical joints of the axial skeleton.
Skuntz S, Mankoo B, Nguyen MT, Hustert E, Nakayama A, Tournier-Lasserve E, Wright CV, Pachnis V, Bharti K, Arnheiter H
(2009) Dev Biol 332: 383-95
MeSH Terms: Animals, Biomarkers, Body Patterning, Cervical Vertebrae, Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental, Homeodomain Proteins, In Situ Hybridization, Joints, Mesoderm, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Transgenic, Phenotype, Promoter Regions, Genetic, Skull, Somites, T-Box Domain Proteins, Transcription Factors
Show Abstract · Added June 11, 2010
Meox1 and Meox2 are two related homeodomain transcription factor genes that together are essential for the development of all somite compartments. Here we show that mice homozygous for Meox1 mutations alone have abnormalities that are restricted to the sclerotome and its derivatives. A prominent and consistent phenotype of these mutations is a remodeling of the cranio-cervical joints whose major feature is the assimilation of the atlas into the basioccipital bone so that the skull rests on the axis. These abnormalities can be traced back to changes in the relative rates of cell proliferation in the rostral and caudal sclerotome compartments, and they are associated with alterations in the expression of at least three transcription factor genes, Tbx18, Uncx, and Bapx1. As previously observed for Bapx1, MEOX1 protein occupies evolutionarily conserved promoter regions of Tbx18 and Uncx, suggesting that Meox1 regulates these genes at least in part directly. Hence, Meox1 is part of a regulatory circuit that serves an essential, non-redundant function in the maintenance of rostro-caudal sclerotome polarity and axial skeleton formation.
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18 MeSH Terms
The calculus of integrating differentiation: timing control of T-bet.
Boothby M
(2009) Immunity 30: 666-8
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cell Differentiation, Gene Expression Regulation, Humans, Interferon-gamma, Interleukin-12, Models, Biological, Signal Transduction, T-Box Domain Proteins, T-Lymphocytes, Helper-Inducer
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
In this issue of Immunity, Schulz et al. (2009) use mathematical modeling to elucidate a signaling network controlling Ifng gene expression, thereby showing the importance of an Interleukin-12-dependent, Interferon-gamma-independent second phase of inducing the transcription factor T-bet.
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10 MeSH Terms
Protection of hippocampal neurogenesis from toll-like receptor 4-dependent innate immune activation by ablation of prostaglandin E2 receptor subtype EP1 or EP2.
Keene CD, Chang R, Stephen C, Nivison M, Nutt SE, Look A, Breyer RM, Horner PJ, Hevner R, Montine TJ
(2009) Am J Pathol 174: 2300-9
MeSH Terms: Animals, Fluorescent Antibody Technique, Hippocampus, Immunity, Innate, Lipopolysaccharides, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Mutant Strains, Neurogenesis, Neurons, Receptors, Prostaglandin E, Receptors, Prostaglandin E, EP1 Subtype, Receptors, Prostaglandin E, EP2 Subtype, Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction, Stem Cells, T-Box Domain Proteins, Toll-Like Receptor 4
Show Abstract · Added December 21, 2013
Prostaglandin E2 is one of several eicosanoid products of the cyclooxygenase isozymes and is a key regulator of innate immune responses; it also possesses paracrine effects on mature neurons. The prostaglandin E2 receptor family consists of four subtypes of which EP1 and EP2 are known to be expressed by microglia. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced innate immune activation leads to the degeneration of intermediate progenitor cells (IPCs) that are destined for neuronal maturation in the hippocampal subgranular zone (SGZ); these cells can be identified by the expression of the transcription factor T-box brain gene 2 (Tbr2). Importantly, depletion of LPS-induced IPCs from the SGZ is suppressed by cyclooxygenase inhibitors. We therefore tested the hypothesis that either EP1 or EP2 is critical to LPS-induced depletion of Tbr2+ IPCs from the SGZ. Expression of either EP1 or EP2 was necessary for Toll-like receptor 4-dependent innate immune-mediated depletion of these Tbr2+ IPCs in mice. Moreover, EP1 activation was directly toxic to murine adult hippocampal progenitor cells; EP2 was not expressed by these cells. Finally, EP1 modulated the response of murine primary microglia cultures to LPS but in a manner distinct from EP2. These results indicate that prostaglandin E2 signaling via either EP1 or EP2 is largely to completely necessary for Toll-like receptor 4-dependent depletion of IPCs from the SGZ and suggest further pharmacological strategies to protect this important neurogenic niche.
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17 MeSH Terms
T-bet dependent removal of Sin3A-histone deacetylase complexes at the Ifng locus drives Th1 differentiation.
Chang S, Collins PL, Aune TM
(2008) J Immunol 181: 8372-81
MeSH Terms: Acetylation, Animals, Cell Differentiation, Cell Proliferation, Cells, Cultured, Histone Acetyltransferases, Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors, Histone Deacetylases, Histones, Interferon-gamma, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Inbred NOD, Mice, Knockout, Protein Transport, Repressor Proteins, T-Box Domain Proteins, Th1 Cells
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
Forming and removing epigenetic histone marks at gene loci are central processes in differentiation. Here, we explored mechanisms establishing long-range H4 acetylation marks at the Ifng locus during Th1 lineage commitment. In Th0 cells, histone deacetylase (HDAC)-Sin3A complexes recruited to the Ifng locus actively prevented accumulation of H4 acetylation marks. Th1 differentiation caused loss of HDAC-Sin3A complexes by T-bet-dependent mechanisms and accumulation of H4 acetylation marks. HDAC-Sin3A complexes were absent from the locus in NOD Th0 cells, obviating the need for Th1 differentiation signals to establish histone marks and Th1 differentiation. Thus, Ifng transcription is actively prevented in Th0 cells via epigenetic mechanisms and epigenetic defects allow unregulated Ifng transcription that may contribute to autoimmunity.
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18 MeSH Terms