Other search tools

About this data

The publication data currently available has been vetted by Vanderbilt faculty, staff, administrators and trainees. The data itself is retrieved directly from NCBI's PubMed and is automatically updated on a weekly basis to ensure accuracy and completeness.

If you have any questions or comments, please contact us.

Results: 11 to 20 of 57

Publication Record

Connections

Spatial clustering during memory search.
Miller JF, Lazarus EM, Polyn SM, Kahana MJ
(2013) J Exp Psychol Learn Mem Cogn 39: 773-81
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Attention, Cluster Analysis, Female, Humans, Male, Mental Recall, Probability, Recognition, Psychology, Space Perception, Time Factors, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added May 4, 2017
In recalling a list of previously experienced items, participants are known to organize their responses on the basis of the items' semantic and temporal similarities. Here, we examine how spatial information influences the organization of responses in free recall. In Experiment 1, participants studied and subsequently recalled lists of landmarks. In Experiment 2, participants played a game in which they delivered objects to landmarks in a virtual environment and later recalled the delivered objects. Participants in both experiments were simply asked to recall as many items as they could remember in any order. By analyzing the conditional probabilities of recall transitions, we demonstrate strong spatial and temporal organization of studied items in both experiments.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
13 MeSH Terms
Working memory encoding and false memory in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder in a spatial delayed response task.
Mayer JS, Park S
(2012) J Abnorm Psychol 121: 784-794
MeSH Terms: Adult, Attention, Bipolar Disorder, Female, Humans, Male, Memory, Short-Term, Middle Aged, Neuropsychological Tests, Photic Stimulation, Reaction Time, Schizophrenic Psychology, Space Perception
Show Abstract · Added July 28, 2015
Working memory (WM) impairment is a core feature of schizophrenia, but the contributions of different WM components are not yet specified. Here, we investigated the potential role of inefficient encoding in reduced WM performance in patients with schizophrenia (PSZ). Twenty-eight PSZ, 16 patients with bipolar disorder (PBP), 16 unaffected and unmedicated relatives of PSZ (REL), and 29 demographically matched healthy controls (HC) performed a spatial delayed response task with either low or high WM demands. The demands on attentional selection were also manipulated by presenting distractor stimuli during encoding in some of the trials. After each trial, participants rated their level of response confidence. This allowed us to analyze different types of WM responses. WM was severely impaired in PSZ compared to HC; this reduction was mainly due to an increase in the amount of false memory responses (incorrect responses that were given with high confidence) rather than an increase in the amount of incorrect and not-confident responses. Although PBP showed WM impairments, they did not have increased false memory errors. In contrast, reduced WM in REL was also accompanied by an increase in false memory errors. The presentation of distractors led to a decline in WM performance, which was comparable across groups indicating that attentional selection was intact in PSZ. These findings suggest that inefficient WM encoding is responsible for impaired WM in schizophrenia and point to differential mechanisms underlying WM impairments in PSZ and PBP.
PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
13 MeSH Terms
Music-reading expertise alters visual spatial resolution for musical notation.
Wong YK, Gauthier I
(2012) Psychon Bull Rev 19: 594-600
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Attention, Female, Humans, Male, Music, Pattern Recognition, Visual, Reading, Recognition, Psychology, Space Perception
Show Abstract · Added February 23, 2016
Crowding occurs when the perception of a suprathreshold target is impaired by nearby distractors, reflecting a fundamental limitation on visual spatial resolution. It is likely that crowding limits music reading, as each musical note is crowded by adjacent notes and by the five-line staff, similar to word reading, in which letter recognition is reduced by crowding from adjacent letters. Here, we tested the hypothesis that, with extensive experience, music-reading experts have acquired visual skills such that they experience a smaller crowding effect, resulting in higher music-reading fluency. Experts experienced a smaller crowding effect than did novices, but only for musical stimuli, not for control stimuli (Landolt Cs). The magnitude of the crowding effect for musical stimuli could be predicted by individual fluency in music reading. Our results highlight the role of experience in crowding: Visual spatial resolution can be improved specifically for objects associated with perceptual expertise. Music-reading rates are likely limited by crowding, and our results are consistent with the idea that experience alleviates these limitations.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
11 MeSH Terms
Interactions between the spatial and temporal stimulus factors that influence multisensory integration in human performance.
Stevenson RA, Fister JK, Barnett ZP, Nidiffer AR, Wallace MT
(2012) Exp Brain Res 219: 121-37
MeSH Terms: Acoustic Stimulation, Adolescent, Auditory Perception, Female, Humans, Judgment, Male, Photic Stimulation, Psychophysics, Reaction Time, Signal Detection, Psychological, Space Perception, Time Factors, Visual Perception, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added March 19, 2014
In natural environments, human sensory systems work in a coordinated and integrated manner to perceive and respond to external events. Previous research has shown that the spatial and temporal relationships of sensory signals are paramount in determining how information is integrated across sensory modalities, but in ecologically plausible settings, these factors are not independent. In the current study, we provide a novel exploration of the impact on behavioral performance for systematic manipulations of the spatial location and temporal synchrony of a visual-auditory stimulus pair. Simple auditory and visual stimuli were presented across a range of spatial locations and stimulus onset asynchronies (SOAs), and participants performed both a spatial localization and simultaneity judgment task. Response times in localizing paired visual-auditory stimuli were slower in the periphery and at larger SOAs, but most importantly, an interaction was found between the two factors, in which the effect of SOA was greater in peripheral as opposed to central locations. Simultaneity judgments also revealed a novel interaction between space and time: individuals were more likely to judge stimuli as synchronous when occurring in the periphery at large SOAs. The results of this study provide novel insights into (a) how the speed of spatial localization of an audiovisual stimulus is affected by location and temporal coincidence and the interaction between these two factors and (b) how the location of a multisensory stimulus impacts judgments concerning the temporal relationship of the paired stimuli. These findings provide strong evidence for a complex interdependency between spatial location and temporal structure in determining the ultimate behavioral and perceptual outcome associated with a paired multisensory (i.e., visual-auditory) stimulus.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
15 MeSH Terms
Impaired passive maintenance and spared manipulation of internal representations in patients with schizophrenia.
Thakkar KN, Park S
(2012) Schizophr Bull 38: 787-95
MeSH Terms: Adult, Case-Control Studies, Female, Humans, Male, Memory Disorders, Memory, Short-Term, Middle Aged, Reaction Time, Schizophrenia, Space Perception
Show Abstract · Added July 28, 2015
Working memory (WM) impairment is a core feature of schizophrenia (SZ), but the integrity of the various components of WM is unclear. After encoding, mental representations must be maintained in WM during the delay period. In addition to maintenance, manipulation of internal representation can occur in WM. It has been argued that manipulation of items in WM is more impaired than simple maintenance in SZ, but direct empirical data to support this claim have been mixed. Discrepant findings among studies might be explained by task parameters, specifically the degree to which the manipulation task places demands on encoding and maintenance processes. The present study set out to examine these components of WM in patients with SZ (n = 20) and demographically matched healthy controls (n = 19) using a spatial delayed response task (DRT) to measure maintenance processes and 2 mental rotation tasks (allocentric and egocentric) with no delay period or restriction on encoding time to measure manipulation processes. Consistent with previous findings, patients were impaired on the spatial DRT. However, patients performed equally well on the egocentric mental rotation task and were more accurate than controls on the allocentric mental rotation task as the required degree of rotation increased. These results indicated impaired maintenance and spared manipulation of representations in WM and suggest a pocket of cognitive function that might be enhanced in SZ.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
11 MeSH Terms
Binding of sights and sounds: age-related changes in multisensory temporal processing.
Hillock AR, Powers AR, Wallace MT
(2011) Neuropsychologia 49: 461-7
MeSH Terms: Acoustic Stimulation, Adult, Aging, Auditory Perception, Child, Cues, Data Interpretation, Statistical, Female, Humans, Male, Photic Stimulation, Psychomotor Performance, Space Perception, Visual Perception, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added March 19, 2014
We live in a multisensory world and one of the challenges the brain is faced with is deciding what information belongs together. Our ability to make assumptions about the relatedness of multisensory stimuli is partly based on their temporal and spatial relationships. Stimuli that are proximal in time and space are likely to be bound together by the brain and ascribed to a common external event. Using this framework we can describe multisensory processes in the context of spatial and temporal filters or windows that compute the probability of the relatedness of stimuli. Whereas numerous studies have examined the characteristics of these multisensory filters in adults and discrepancies in window size have been reported between infants and adults, virtually nothing is known about multisensory temporal processing in childhood. To examine this, we compared the ability of 10 and 11 year olds and adults to detect audiovisual temporal asynchrony. Findings revealed striking and asymmetric age-related differences. Whereas children were able to identify asynchrony as readily as adults when visual stimuli preceded auditory cues, significant group differences were identified at moderately long stimulus onset asynchronies (150-350 ms) where the auditory stimulus was first. Results suggest that changes in audiovisual temporal perception extend beyond the first decade of life. In addition to furthering our understanding of basic multisensory developmental processes, these findings have implications on disorders (e.g., autism, dyslexia) in which emerging evidence suggests alterations in multisensory temporal function.
Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
15 MeSH Terms
Looking at the center of the targets helps multiple object tracking.
Fehd HM, Seiffert AE
(2010) J Vis 10: 19.1-13
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Attention, Eye Movements, Female, Fixation, Ocular, Humans, Male, Motion Perception, Photic Stimulation, Space Perception, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added April 5, 2017
The ability to move our gaze to locations of interest facilitates interactions in everyday life. Where do participants direct gaze when multiple locations are of interest simultaneously? We previously demonstrated that, when tracking several moving targets amidst distractors in a multiple object tracking (MOT) task, participants primarily looked at a central point in between the targets (H. M. Fehd & A. E. Seiffert, 2008). This strategy of center-looking is in contrast to a target-looking strategy where participants would saccade from target to target. Here we investigated what factors influence the use of center-looking as well as its effectiveness. By decreasing object speed, we determined that center-looking is not a result of avoiding costly eye movements during tracking. Decreasing object size showed that peripheral visibility is necessary for tracking, but that center-looking continues up to the limits of peripheral visibility. Further analysis revealed that participants often engaged in both target-looking and center-looking by switching gaze from the center to targets and back again. Directly comparing participants' performance when they either did or did not include center-looking along with target-looking revealed that center-looking facilitates tracking performance. These results suggest that there is value in looking at the center that relates directly to the process of tracking multiple objects.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
12 MeSH Terms
Perceptual expertise with objects predicts another hallmark of face perception.
McGugin RW, Gauthier I
(2009) J Vis 10: 15.1-12
MeSH Terms: Face, Female, Form Perception, Humans, Male, Orientation, Pattern Recognition, Visual, Perceptual Distortion, Photic Stimulation, Predictive Value of Tests, Space Perception, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added February 23, 2016
There is no shortage of evidence to suggest that faces constitute a special category in human perception. Surprisingly little consensus exists, however, regarding the interpretation of these results. The question persists: what makes faces special? We address this issue via one hallmark of face perception-its striking sensitivity to low-level image format-and present evidence in favor of an expertise account of the specialization of face perception. In accordance with earlier work (I. Biederman & P. Kalocsai, 1997), we find that manipulating one image into two versions that are complementary in spatial frequency (SF) and orientation information disproportionately impairs face matching relative to object matching. Here, we demonstrate that this characteristic of face processing is also found for cars, with its magnitude predicted by the observers' level of expertise with cars. We argue that the bar needs to be raised for what constitutes proper evidence that face perception is special in a manner that is not related to our expertise in this domain.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
12 MeSH Terms
Recovery from spatial neglect and hemiplegia in a child despite a large anterior circulation stroke and Wallerian degeneration.
Kleinman JT, Gailloud P, Jordan LC
(2010) J Child Neurol 25: 500-3
MeSH Terms: Brain, Brain Infarction, Child, Humans, Infarction, Anterior Cerebral Artery, Infarction, Middle Cerebral Artery, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Neuronal Plasticity, Perceptual Disorders, Prognosis, Recovery of Function, Severity of Illness Index, Space Perception, Visual Perception, Wallerian Degeneration
Show Abstract · Added March 24, 2020
Prognosis after stroke in children is difficult given the paucity of literature regarding motor and cognitive recovery. Spatial neglect has been described in children after stroke, yet little evidence exists to guide clinicians and parents regarding its resolution. Wallerian degeneration on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) suggests poor recovery in neonates and adults. We report near complete resolution of spatial neglect in 4 weeks and significant improvement in hemiplegia in a 9-year-old boy with a right anterior cerebral artery and middle cerebral artery infarction, despite Wallerian degeneration apparent on diffusion-weighted imaging. Serial assessment of neglect documenting the rapid course of recovery is the unique feature of this case and may help serve as a guide to pediatricians and neurologists in assessment of young patients and counseling of parents. The lack of published outcome data suggests a need for larger studies about the recovery of spatial neglect and other cognitive symptoms following pediatric stroke.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
MeSH Terms
Ascorbic acid attenuates scopolamine-induced spatial learning deficits in the water maze.
Harrison FE, Hosseini AH, Dawes SM, Weaver S, May JM
(2009) Behav Brain Res 205: 550-8
MeSH Terms: Acetylcholinesterase, Animals, Ascorbic Acid, Cerebral Cortex, Corpus Striatum, Escape Reaction, Female, Learning Disabilities, Liver, Locomotion, Male, Maze Learning, Mice, Mice, Inbred Strains, Nootropic Agents, Prosencephalon, Scopolamine, Space Perception, Time Factors
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
Vitamin C (ascorbate) has important antioxidant functions that can help protect against oxidative stress in the brain and damage associated with neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. When administered parenterally ascorbate can bypass saturable uptake mechanisms in the gut and thus higher tissue concentrations can be achieved than by oral administration. In the present study we show that ascorbate (125 mg/kg) administered intraperitoneally (i.p.) 1-h before testing, partially attenuated scopolamine-induced (1 mg/kg i.p.) cognitive deficits in Morris water maze performance in young mice. Cumulative search error, but not escape latency nor path length, was significantly improved during acquisition in ascorbate plus scopolamine-treated mice although performance did not equal that of control mice. During the probe trial, scopolamine led to increased search error and chance level of time spent in the platform quadrant, whereas mice pre-treated with ascorbate prior to scopolamine did not differ from control mice on these measures. Ascorbate had no effect on unimpaired, control mice and neither did it reduce the peripheral, activity-increasing effects of scopolamine. Ascorbate alone increased acetylcholinesterase activity in the medial forebrain area but had no effect in cortex or striatum. This change, and its action against the amnestic effects of the muscarinic antagonist scopolamine, suggest that ascorbate may be acting in part via altered cholinergic signaling. However, further investigation is necessary to isolate the cognition-enhancing effects of ascorbate.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
19 MeSH Terms