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Vein involvement during pancreaticoduodenectomy: is there a need for redefinition of "borderline resectable disease"?
Kelly KJ, Winslow E, Kooby D, Lad NL, Parikh AA, Scoggins CR, Ahmad S, Martin RC, Maithel SK, Kim HJ, Merchant NB, Cho CS, Weber SM
(2013) J Gastrointest Surg 17: 1209-17; discussion 1217
MeSH Terms: Adenocarcinoma, Aged, Female, Humans, Male, Mesenteric Veins, Middle Aged, Neoplasm Invasiveness, Pancreatic Neoplasms, Pancreaticoduodenectomy, Portal Vein, Retrospective Studies, Vascular Neoplasms
Show Abstract · Added March 7, 2014
INTRODUCTION - Current National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines recommend neoadjuvant therapy for borderline resectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma to increase the likelihood of achieving R0 resection. A consensus has not been reached on the degree of venous involvement that constitutes borderline resectability. This study compares the outcome of patients who underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy with or without vein resection without neoadjuvant therapy.
METHODS - A multi-institutional database of patients who underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy was reviewed. Patients who required vein resection due to gross vein involvement by tumor were compared to those without evidence of vein involvement.
RESULTS - Of 492 patients undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy, 70 (14 %) had vein resection and 422 (86 %) did not. There was no difference in R0 resection (66 vs. 75 %, p = NS). On multivariate analysis, vein involvement was not predictive of disease-free or overall survival.
CONCLUSION - This is the largest modern series examining patients with or without isolated vein involvement by pancreas cancer, none of whom received neoadjuvant therapy. Oncological outcome was not different between the two groups. These data suggest that up-front surgical resection is an appropriate option and call into question the inclusion of isolated vein involvement in the definition of "borderline resectable disease."
0 Communities
2 Members
0 Resources
13 MeSH Terms
On the implementation of an automated acoustic output optimization algorithm for subharmonic aided pressure estimation.
Dave JK, Halldorsdottir VG, Eisenbrey JR, Merton DA, Liu JB, Machado P, Zhao H, Park S, Dianis S, Chalek CL, Thomenius KE, Brown DB, Forsberg F
(2013) Ultrasonics 53: 880-8
MeSH Terms: Acoustics, Algorithms, Animals, Blood Pressure Determination, Contrast Media, Dogs, Ferric Compounds, Image Enhancement, Iron, Oxides, Portal Pressure, Portal Vein, Ultrasonography
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
Incident acoustic output (IAO) dependent subharmonic signal amplitudes from ultrasound contrast agents can be categorized into occurrence, growth or saturation stages. Subharmonic aided pressure estimation (SHAPE) is a technique that utilizes growth stage subharmonic signal amplitudes for hydrostatic pressure estimation. In this study, we developed an automated IAO optimization algorithm to identify the IAO level eliciting growth stage subharmonic signals and also studied the effect of pulse length on SHAPE. This approach may help eliminate the problems of acquiring and analyzing the data offline at all IAO levels as was done in previous studies and thus, pave the way for real-time clinical pressure monitoring applications. The IAO optimization algorithm was implemented on a Logiq 9 (GE Healthcare, Milwaukee, WI) scanner interfaced with a computer. The optimization algorithm stepped the ultrasound scanner from 0% to 100% IAO. A logistic equation fitting function was applied with the criterion of minimum least squared error between the fitted subharmonic amplitudes and the measured subharmonic amplitudes as a function of the IAO levels and the optimum IAO level was chosen corresponding to the inflection point calculated from the fitted data. The efficacy of the optimum IAO level was investigated for in vivo SHAPE to monitor portal vein (PV) pressures in 5 canines and was compared with the performance of IAO levels, below and above the optimum IAO level, for 4, 8 and 16 transmit cycles. The canines received a continuous infusion of Sonazoid microbubbles (1.5 μl/kg/min; GE Healthcare, Oslo, Norway). PV pressures were obtained using a surgically introduced pressure catheter (Millar Instruments, Inc., Houston, TX) and were recorded before and after increasing PV pressures. The experiments showed that optimum IAO levels for SHAPE in the canines ranged from 6% to 40%. The best correlation between changes in PV pressures and in subharmonic amplitudes (r=-0.76; p=0.24), and between the absolute PV pressures and the subharmonic amplitudes (r=-0.89; p<0.01) were obtained for the optimized IAO and 4 transmit cycles. Only for the optimized IAO and 4 transmit cycles did the subharmonic amplitudes differ significantly (p<0.01) before and after increasing PV pressures. A new algorithm to identify optimum IAO levels for SHAPE has been developed and validated with the best results being obtained for 4 transmit cycles. The work presented in this study may pave the way for real-time clinical applications of estimating pressures using the subharmonic signals from ultrasound contrast agents.
Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
13 MeSH Terms
3-dimensional resin casting and imaging of mouse portal vein or intrahepatic bile duct system.
Walter TJ, Sparks EE, Huppert SS
(2012) J Vis Exp : e4272
MeSH Terms: Animals, Bile Ducts, Intrahepatic, Imaging, Three-Dimensional, Mice, Models, Anatomic, Portal Vein, Resins, Synthetic
Show Abstract · Added December 5, 2013
In organs, the correct architecture of vascular and ductal structures is indispensable for proper physiological function, and the formation and maintenance of these structures is a highly regulated process. The analysis of these complex, 3-dimensional structures has greatly depended on either 2-dimensional examination in section or on dye injection studies. These techniques, however, are not able to provide a complete and quantifiable representation of the ductal or vascular structures they are intended to elucidate. Alternatively, the nature of 3-dimensional plastic resin casts generates a permanent snapshot of the system and is a novel and widely useful technique for visualizing and quantifying 3-dimensional structures and networks. A crucial advantage of the resin casting system is the ability to determine the intact and connected, or communicating, structure of a blood vessel or duct. The structure of vascular and ductal networks are crucial for organ function, and this technique has the potential to aid study of vascular and ductal networks in several ways. Resin casting may be used to analyze normal morphology and functional architecture of a luminal structure, identify developmental morphogenetic changes, and uncover morphological differences in tissue architecture between normal and disease states. Previous work has utilized resin casting to study, for example, architectural and functional defects within the mouse intrahepatic bile duct system that were not reflected in 2-dimensional analysis of the structure(1,2), alterations in brain vasculature of a Alzheimer's disease mouse model(3), portal vein abnormalities in portal hypertensive and cirrhotic mice(4), developmental steps in rat lymphatic maturation between immature and adult lungs(5), immediate microvascular changes in the rat liver, pancreas, and kidney in response in to chemical injury(6). Here we present a method of generating a 3-dimensional resin cast of a mouse vascular or ductal network, focusing specifically on the portal vein and intrahepatic bile duct. These casts can be visualized by clearing or macerating the tissue and can then be analyzed. This technique can be applied to virtually any vascular or ductal system and would be directly applicable to any study inquiring into the development, function, maintenance, or injury of a 3-dimensional ductal or vascular structure.
1 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
7 MeSH Terms
Portal vein glucose entry triggers a coordinated cellular response that potentiates hepatic glucose uptake and storage in normal but not high-fat/high-fructose-fed dogs.
Coate KC, Kraft G, Irimia JM, Smith MS, Farmer B, Neal DW, Roach PJ, Shiota M, Cherrington AD
(2013) Diabetes 62: 392-400
MeSH Terms: Animals, Diet, High-Fat, Dogs, Fructose, Glucokinase, Glucose, Glucose Intolerance, Glycogen Synthase, Hyperglycemia, Hyperinsulinism, Liver, Liver Glycogen, Male, Portal Vein, Signal Transduction
Show Abstract · Added December 5, 2013
The cellular events mediating the pleiotropic actions of portal vein glucose (PoG) delivery on hepatic glucose disposition have not been clearly defined. Likewise, the molecular defects associated with postprandial hyperglycemia and impaired hepatic glucose uptake (HGU) following consumption of a high-fat, high-fructose diet (HFFD) are unknown. Our goal was to identify hepatocellular changes elicited by hyperinsulinemia, hyperglycemia, and PoG signaling in normal chow-fed (CTR) and HFFD-fed dogs. In CTR dogs, we demonstrated that PoG infusion in the presence of hyperinsulinemia and hyperglycemia triggered an increase in the activity of hepatic glucokinase (GK) and glycogen synthase (GS), which occurred in association with further augmentation in HGU and glycogen synthesis (GSYN) in vivo. In contrast, 4 weeks of HFFD feeding markedly reduced GK protein content and impaired the activation of GS in association with diminished HGU and GSYN in vivo. Furthermore, the enzymatic changes associated with PoG sensing in chow-fed animals were abolished in HFFD-fed animals, consistent with loss of the stimulatory effects of PoG delivery. These data reveal new insight into the molecular physiology of the portal glucose signaling mechanism under normal conditions and to the pathophysiology of aberrant postprandial hepatic glucose disposition evident under a diet-induced glucose-intolerant condition.
1 Communities
3 Members
1 Resources
15 MeSH Terms
Portal glucose delivery stimulates muscle but not liver protein metabolism.
Kraft G, Coate KC, Dardevet D, Farmer B, Donahue EP, Williams PE, Cherrington AD, Moore MC
(2012) Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 303: E1202-11
MeSH Terms: Amino Acid Transport System ASC, Amino Acids, Animals, Dogs, Enteral Nutrition, Glucose, Infusions, Intravenous, Large Neutral Amino Acid-Transporter 1, Liver, Male, Muscle, Skeletal, Phosphorylation, Portal Vein, Postprandial Period, Protein Biosynthesis, Ribosomal Protein S6 Kinases, 70-kDa
Show Abstract · Added December 5, 2013
Portal vein glucose delivery (the portal glucose signal) stimulates glucose uptake and glycogen storage by the liver, whereas portal amino acid (AA) delivery (the portal AA signal) induces an increase in protein synthesis by the liver. During a meal, both signals coexist and may interact. In this study, we compared the protein synthesis rates in the liver and muscle in response to portal or peripheral glucose infusion during intraportal infusion of a complete AA mixture. Dogs were surgically prepared with hepatic sampling catheters and flow probes. After a 42-h fast, they underwent a 3-h hyperinsulinemic (4× basal) hyperglucagonemic (3× basal) hyperglycemic (≈160 mg/dl) hyperaminoacidemic (hepatic load 1.5× basal; delivered intraportally) clamp (postprandial conditions). Glucose was infused either via a peripheral (PeG; n = 7) or the portal vein (PoG; n = 8). Protein synthesis was assessed with a primed, continuous [(14)C]leucine infusion. Net hepatic glucose uptake was stimulated by portal glucose infusion (+1 mg·kg(-1)·min(-1), P < 0.05) as expected, but hepatic fractional AA extraction and hepatic protein synthesis did not differ between groups. There was a lower arterial AA concentration in the PoG group (-19%, P < 0.05) and a significant stimulation (+30%) of muscle protein synthesis associated with increased expression of LAT1 and ASCT2 AA transporters and p70S6 phosphorylation. Concomitant portal glucose and AA delivery enhances skeletal muscle protein synthesis compared with peripheral glucose and portal AA delivery. These data suggest that enteral nutrition support may have an advantage over parenteral nutrition in stimulating muscle protein synthesis.
1 Communities
3 Members
1 Resources
16 MeSH Terms
Liver glycogen loading dampens glycogen synthesis seen in response to either hyperinsulinemia or intraportal glucose infusion.
Winnick JJ, An Z, Kraft G, Ramnanan CJ, Irimia JM, Smith M, Lautz M, Roach PJ, Cherrington AD
(2013) Diabetes 62: 96-101
MeSH Terms: AMP-Activated Protein Kinases, Animals, Dogs, Glucose, Hyperinsulinism, Liver, Liver Glycogen, Portal Vein
Show Abstract · Added December 5, 2013
The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of liver glycogen loading on net hepatic glycogen synthesis during hyperinsulinemia or hepatic portal vein glucose infusion in vivo. Liver glycogen levels were supercompensated (SCGly) in two groups (using intraportal fructose infusion) but not in two others (Gly) during hyperglycemic-normoinsulinemia. Following a 2-h control period during which fructose infusion was stopped, there was a 2-h experimental period in which the response to hyperglycemia plus either 4× basal insulin (INS) or portal vein glucose infusion (PoG) was measured. Increased hepatic glycogen reduced the percent of glucose taken up by the liver that was deposited in glycogen (74 ± 3 vs. 53 ± 5% in Gly+INS and SCGly+INS, respectively, and 72 ± 3 vs. 50 ± 6% in Gly+PoG and SCGly+PoG, respectively). The reduction in liver glycogen synthesis in SCGly+INS was accompanied by a decrease in both insulin signaling and an increase in AMPK activation, whereas only the latter was observed in SCGly+PoG. These data indicate that liver glycogen loading impairs glycogen synthesis regardless of the signal used to stimulate it.
1 Communities
3 Members
1 Resources
8 MeSH Terms
Investigating the efficacy of subharmonic aided pressure estimation for portal vein pressures and portal hypertension monitoring.
Dave JK, Halldorsdottir VG, Eisenbrey JR, Merton DA, Liu JB, Zhou JH, Wang HK, Park S, Dianis S, Chalek CL, Lin F, Thomenius KE, Brown DB, Forsberg F
(2012) Ultrasound Med Biol 38: 1784-98
MeSH Terms: Animals, Arterial Pressure, Blood Pressure Determination, Contrast Media, Dogs, Ferric Compounds, Hypertension, Portal, Image Enhancement, Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted, Iron, Oxides, Portal Vein, Reproducibility of Results, Sensitivity and Specificity, Ultrasonography
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
The efficacy of using subharmonic emissions from Sonazoid microbubbles (GE Healthcare, Oslo, Norway) to track portal vein pressures and pressure changes was investigated in 14 canines using either slow- or high-flow models of portal hypertension (PH). A modified Logiq 9 scanner (GE Healthcare, Milwaukee, WI, USA) operating in subharmonic mode (f(transmit): 2.5 MHz, f(receive): 1.25 MHz) was used to collect radiofrequency data at 10-40% incident acoustic power levels with 2-4 transmit cycles (in triplicate) before and after inducing PH. A pressure catheter (Millar Instruments, Inc., Houston, TX, USA) provided reference portal vein pressures. At optimum insonification, subharmonic signal amplitude changes correlated with portal vein pressure changes; r ranged from -0.82 to -0.94 and from -0.70 to -0.73 for PH models considered separately or together, respectively. The subharmonic signal amplitudes correlated with absolute portal vein pressures (r: -0.71 to -0.79). Statistically significant differences between subharmonic amplitudes, before and after inducing PH, were noted (p ≤ 0.01). Portal vein pressures estimated using subharmonic aided pressure estimation did not reveal significant differences (p > 0.05) with respect to the pressures obtained using the Millar pressure catheter. Subharmonic-aided pressure estimation may be useful clinically for portal vein pressure monitoring.
Copyright © 2012 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
15 MeSH Terms
A cyclic guanosine monophosphate-dependent pathway can regulate net hepatic glucose uptake in vivo.
An Z, Winnick JJ, Moore MC, Farmer B, Smith M, Irimia JM, Roach PJ, Cherrington AD
(2012) Diabetes 61: 2433-41
MeSH Terms: Animals, Blood Pressure, Cyclic AMP, Cyclic GMP, Dogs, Glucagon, Glucose, Glycogen Phosphorylase, Glycogen Synthase, Insulin, Liver, Portal Vein, Signal Transduction
Show Abstract · Added June 2, 2014
We previously showed that hepatic nitric oxide regulates net hepatic glucose uptake (NHGU), an effect that can be eliminated by inhibiting hepatic soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC), suggesting that the sGC pathway is involved in the regulation of NHGU. The aim of the current study was to determine whether hepatic cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) reduces NHGU. Studies were performed on conscious dogs with transhepatic catheters. A hyperglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp was established in the presence of portal vein glucose infusion. 8-Br-cGMP (50 µg/kg/min) was delivered intraportally, and either the glucose load to the liver (CGMP/GLC; n = 5) or the glucose concentration entering the liver (CGMP/GCC; n = 5) was clamped at 2× basal. In the control group, saline was given intraportally (SAL; n = 10), and the hepatic glucose concentration and load were doubled. 8-Br-cGMP increased portal blood flow, necessitating the two approaches to glucose clamping in the cGMP groups. NHGU (mg/kg/min) was 5.8 ± 0.5, 2.7 ± 0.5, and 4.8 ± 0.3, whereas the fractional extraction of glucose was 11.0 ± 1, 5.5 ± 1, and 8.5 ± 1% during the last hour of the study in SAL, CGMP/GLC, and CGMP/GCC, respectively. The reduction of NHGU in response to 8-Br-cGMP was associated with increased AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylation. These data indicate that changes in liver cGMP can regulate NHGU under postprandial conditions.
0 Communities
3 Members
1 Resources
13 MeSH Terms
Regulation of hepatic glucose uptake and storage in vivo.
Moore MC, Coate KC, Winnick JJ, An Z, Cherrington AD
(2012) Adv Nutr 3: 286-94
MeSH Terms: AMP-Activated Protein Kinases, Animals, Biological Transport, Blood Glucose, Fructose, Glucose, Glycogen, Humans, Insulin, Liver, Models, Animal, Portal Vein, Postprandial Period
Show Abstract · Added December 5, 2013
In the postprandial state, the liver takes up and stores glucose to minimize the fluctuation of glycemia. Elevated insulin concentrations, an increase in the load of glucose reaching the liver, and the oral/enteral/portal vein route of glucose delivery (compared with the peripheral intravenous route) are factors that increase the rate of net hepatic glucose uptake (NHGU). The entry of glucose into the portal vein stimulates a portal glucose signal that not only enhances NHGU but concomitantly reduces muscle glucose uptake to ensure appropriate partitioning of a glucose load. This coordinated regulation of glucose uptake is likely neurally mediated, at least in part, because it is not observed after total hepatic denervation. Moreover, there is evidence that both the sympathetic and the nitrergic innervation of the liver exert a tonic repression of NHGU that is relieved under feeding conditions. Further, the energy sensor 5'AMP-activated protein kinase appears to be involved in regulation of NHGU and glycogen storage. Consumption of a high-fat and high-fructose diet impairs NHGU and glycogen storage in association with a reduction in glucokinase protein and activity. An understanding of the impact of nutrients themselves and the route of nutrient delivery on liver carbohydrate metabolism is fundamental to the development of therapies for impaired postprandial glucoregulation.
1 Communities
3 Members
1 Resources
13 MeSH Terms
Hepatic glycogen supercompensation activates AMP-activated protein kinase, impairs insulin signaling, and reduces glycogen deposition in the liver.
Winnick JJ, An Z, Ramnanan CJ, Smith M, Irimia JM, Neal DW, Moore MC, Roach PJ, Cherrington AD
(2011) Diabetes 60: 398-407
MeSH Terms: AMP-Activated Protein Kinases, Analysis of Variance, Animals, Blood Glucose, Blotting, Western, Dogs, Fatty Acids, Nonesterified, Female, Fructose, Glucagon, Insulin, Liver, Liver Glycogen, Male, Portal Vein, Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction, Signal Transduction
Show Abstract · Added December 5, 2013
OBJECTIVE - The objective of this study was to determine how increasing the hepatic glycogen content would affect the liver's ability to take up and metabolize glucose.
RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - During the first 4 h of the study, liver glycogen deposition was stimulated by intraportal fructose infusion in the presence of hyperglycemic-normoinsulinemia. This was followed by a 2-h hyperglycemic-normoinsulinemic control period, during which the fructose infusion was stopped, and a 2-h experimental period in which net hepatic glucose uptake (NHGU) and disposition (glycogen, lactate, and CO(2)) were measured in the absence of fructose but in the presence of a hyperglycemic-hyperinsulinemic challenge including portal vein glucose infusion.
RESULTS - Fructose infusion increased net hepatic glycogen synthesis (0.7 ± 0.5 vs. 6.4 ± 0.4 mg/kg/min; P < 0.001), causing a large difference in hepatic glycogen content (62 ± 9 vs. 100 ± 3 mg/g; P < 0.001). Hepatic glycogen supercompensation (fructose infusion group) did not alter NHGU, but it reduced the percent of NHGU directed to glycogen (79 ± 4 vs. 55 ± 6; P < 0.01) and increased the percent directed to lactate (12 ± 3 vs. 29 ± 5; P = 0.01) and oxidation (9 ± 3 vs. 16 ± 3; P = NS). This change was associated with increased AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylation, diminished insulin signaling, and a shift in glycogenic enzyme activity toward a state discouraging glycogen accumulation.
CONCLUSIONS - These data indicate that increases in hepatic glycogen can generate a state of hepatic insulin resistance, which is characterized by impaired glycogen synthesis despite preserved NHGU.
1 Communities
2 Members
0 Resources
17 MeSH Terms