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Prospective study of urinary prostaglandin E2 metabolite and pancreatic cancer risk.
Cui Y, Shu XO, Li HL, Yang G, Wen W, Gao YT, Cai Q, Rothman N, Yin HY, Lan Q, Xiang YB, Zheng W
(2017) Int J Cancer 141: 2423-2429
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Body Mass Index, Case-Control Studies, China, Chromatography, Liquid, Cyclooxygenase 2, Female, Humans, Logistic Models, Male, Middle Aged, Odds Ratio, Pancreatic Neoplasms, Prospective Studies, Prostaglandins, Tandem Mass Spectrometry
Show Abstract · Added April 3, 2018
The cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) pathway is upregulated in many pancreatic cancer cells, and it is believed that carcinogenetic effects of COX-2 upregulation are largely through prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) overproduction. We tested this hypothesis by evaluating the association between urinary PGE2 metabolites (PGE-M), a biomarker of in vivo PGE2 overproduction, and pancreatic cancer risk. We conducted a case-control study with 722 subjects (239 cases and 483 controls) nested within two prospective cohort studies, the Shanghai Women's Health Study (SWHS) and Shanghai Men's Health Study (SMHS). Pre-diagnosis urine samples were measured for PGE-M using a liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometric method. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI), with adjustment for potential confounders. Compared to those with the lowest urine level of PGE-M (the first quartile), individuals with higher urine levels of PGE-M had an increased risk of developing pancreatic cancer, with adjusted ORs (95%CI) of 1.63 (0.98-2.73), 1.55 (0.90-2.69) and 1.94 (1.07-3.51), for the second to the fourth quartile groups, respectively (p for trend = 0.054). This dose-response positive association was more evident among those who had BMI <25 kg/m than overweight individuals (p for interaction = 0.058). After excluding cases diagnosed in the first year of follow-up and their matched controls, this positive association persisted (p for trend = 0.037) and the interaction became statistically significant (p for interaction = 0.017). Our study adds additional evidence that the COX-2 pathway is involved in pancreatic carcinogenesis and suggests that urinary PGE-M may serve as a biomarker for predicting pancreatic cancer risk.
© 2017 UICC.
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Alcohol Use and Cardiovascular Disease Risk in Patients With Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.
VanWagner LB, Ning H, Allen NB, Ajmera V, Lewis CE, Carr JJ, Lloyd-Jones DM, Terrault NA, Siddique J
(2017) Gastroenterology 153: 1260-1272.e3
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Age Factors, Alcohol Drinking, Binge Drinking, Chi-Square Distribution, Coronary Artery Disease, Cross-Sectional Studies, Echocardiography, Doppler, Female, Humans, Linear Models, Logistic Models, Longitudinal Studies, Male, Middle Aged, Multidetector Computed Tomography, Multivariate Analysis, Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease, Odds Ratio, Prognosis, Protective Factors, Risk Assessment, Risk Factors, Time Factors, Underage Drinking, United States, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added September 11, 2017
BACKGROUND & AIMS - Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death among patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Moderate drinking (vs abstinence) is associated with lower risk of CVD in the general population. We assessed whether alcohol use is associated with CVD risk in patients with NAFLD.
METHODS - We analyzed data from participants in the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults longitudinal cohort study of 5115 black and white young adults, 18-30 years old, recruited from 4 cities in the United States from 1985 through 1986. Participants self-reported alcohol use at study entry and then again after 15, 20, and 25 years. At year 25 (2010-2011), participants underwent computed tomography examination of the thorax and abdomen and tissue Doppler echocardiography with myocardial strain measured by speckle tracking. Coronary artery calcification was defined as an Agatston score above 0. NAFLD was defined as liver attenuation <51 Hounsfield Units after exclusions. Drinkers reported 1-21 (men) or 1-14 (women) standard drinks/week at years 15, 20, or 25. Nondrinkers reported no alcohol use at years 15, 20, and 25.
RESULTS - Of the 570 participants with NAFLD (mean age, 50 years; 54% black; 46% female), 332 (58%) were drinkers; significantly higher proportions of drinkers were white, male, and with higher levels of education compared with nondrinkers (P < .05 for all). Higher proportions of drinkers had obesity, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome compared with nondrinkers (P < .01). There was no difference in liver attenuation between groups (P = .12). After multivariable adjustment, there was no association between alcohol use and CVD risk factors (diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia) or subclinical CVD measures (coronary artery calcification, early transmitral velocity/late (atrial) transmitral velocity (E/A) ratio, global longitudinal strain).
CONCLUSIONS - In a population-based sample of individuals with NAFLD in midlife, prospectively assessed alcohol use is not associated with significant differences in risk factors for CVD or markers of subclinical CVD. In contrast to general population findings, alcohol use may not reduce the risk of CVD in patients with NAFLD.
Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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PUFA levels in erythrocyte membrane phospholipids are differentially associated with colorectal adenoma risk.
Rifkin SB, Shrubsole MJ, Cai Q, Smalley WE, Ness RM, Swift LL, Zheng W, Murff HJ
(2017) Br J Nutr 117: 1615-1622
MeSH Terms: Adenoma, Arachidonic Acid, Biomarkers, Case-Control Studies, Colorectal Neoplasms, Diet, Eicosapentaenoic Acid, Erythrocyte Membrane, Female, Humans, Logistic Models, Male, Middle Aged, Odds Ratio, Phospholipids, Risk Factors, Tennessee
Show Abstract · Added April 3, 2018
Dietary intake of PUFA has been associated with colorectal neoplasm risk; however, results from observational studies have been inconsistent. Most prior studies have utilised self-reported dietary measures to assess fatty acid exposure which might be more susceptible to measurement error and biases compared with biomarkers. The purpose of this study was to determine whether erythrocyte phospholipid membrane PUFA percentages are associated with colorectal adenoma risk. We included data from 904 adenoma cases and 835 polyp-free controls who participated in the Tennessee Colorectal Polyp Study, a large colonoscopy-based case-control study. Erythrocyte membrane PUFA percentages were measured using GC. Conditional logistic regression was used to calculate adjusted OR for risk of colorectal adenomas with erythrocyte membrane PUFA. Higher erythrocyte membrane percentages of arachidonic acid was associated with an increased risk of colorectal adenomas (adjusted OR 1·66; 95 % CI 1·05, 2·62, P trend=0·02) comparing the highest tertile to the lowest tertile. The effect size for arachidonic acid was more pronounced when restricting the analysis to advanced adenomas only. Higher erythrocyte membrane EPA percentages were associated with a trend towards a reduced risk of advanced colorectal adenomas (P trend=0·05). Erythrocyte membrane arachidonic acid percentages are associated with an increased risk of colorectal adenomas.
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Association of ectopic fat with abdominal aorto-illiac and coronary artery calcification in african ancestry men.
Kuipers AL, Zmuda JM, Carr JJ, Terry JG, Nair S, Cvejkus R, Bunker CH, Patrick AL, Wassel CL, Miljkovic I
(2017) Atherosclerosis 263: 198-204
MeSH Terms: Absorptiometry, Photon, Adiposity, Adult, African Continental Ancestry Group, Aged, Aorta, Abdominal, Aortic Diseases, Aortography, Chi-Square Distribution, Computed Tomography Angiography, Coronary Angiography, Coronary Artery Disease, Humans, Iliac Artery, Intra-Abdominal Fat, Liver, Logistic Models, Male, Middle Aged, Muscle, Skeletal, Odds Ratio, Prospective Studies, Risk Factors, Trinidad and Tobago, Vascular Calcification
Show Abstract · Added September 11, 2017
BACKGROUND AND AIMS - There is strong evidence that fat accumulating in non-adipose sites, "ectopic fat", is associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD), including vascular calcification. Most previous studies of this association have assessed only a single ectopic fat depot. Therefore, our aim was to assess the association of total, regional, and ectopic fat with abdominal aorto-illiac calcification (AAC) and coronary artery calcification (CAC) in 798 African ancestry men.
METHODS - Participants (mean age 62) were from the Tobago Bone Health Study cohort. Adiposity was assessed via clinical examination, dual x-ray absorptiometry, and computed tomography (CT). Ectopic fat depots included: abdominal visceral adipose tissue (VAT), liver attenuation, and calf intermuscular adipose tissue (IMAT). Vascular calcification was assessed by CT and quantified as present versus absent. Associations were tested using multiple logistic regression adjusted for traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Models of ectopic fat were additionally adjusted for total body fat and standing height.
RESULTS - All adiposity measures, except VAT, were associated with AAC. Lower liver attenuation or greater calf IMAT was associated with 1.2-1.3-fold increased odds of AAC (p < 0.03 for both), though calf IMAT was a stronger predictor than liver attenuation (p < 0.001) when entered in a single model. No ectopic fat measure was associated with CAC.
CONCLUSIONS - Greater adiposity in the skeletal muscle and liver, but not in the visceral compartment, was associated with increased odds of AAC in African ancestry men. These results highlight the potential importance of both quantity and location of adiposity accumulation throughout the body.
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
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Admixture mapping of pelvic organ prolapse in African Americans from the Women's Health Initiative Hormone Therapy trial.
Giri A, Hartmann KE, Aldrich MC, Ward RM, Wu JM, Park AJ, Graff M, Qi L, Nassir R, Wallace RB, O'Sullivan MJ, North KE, Velez Edwards DR, Edwards TL
(2017) PLoS One 12: e0178839
MeSH Terms: Actins, African Americans, Aged, Body Mass Index, Case-Control Studies, Cystocele, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, GPI-Linked Proteins, Gene Expression, Humans, Logistic Models, Middle Aged, Molecular Chaperones, Nerve Tissue Proteins, Odds Ratio, Parity, Quantitative Trait Loci, Quantitative Trait, Heritable, Rectocele, Risk Factors, Severity of Illness Index, United States, Uterine Prolapse, Women's Health
Show Abstract · Added February 21, 2019
Evidence suggests European American (EA) women have two- to five-fold increased odds of having pelvic organ prolapse (POP) when compared with African American (AA) women. However, the role of genetic ancestry in relation to POP risk is not clear. Here we evaluate the association between genetic ancestry and POP in AA women from the Women's Health Initiative Hormone Therapy trial. Women with grade 1 or higher classification, and grade 2 or higher classification for uterine prolapse, cystocele or rectocele at baseline or during follow-up were considered to have any POP (N = 805) and moderate/severe POP (N = 156), respectively. Women with at least two pelvic exams with no indication for POP served as controls (N = 344). We performed case-only, and case-control admixture-mapping analyses using multiple logistic regression while adjusting for age, BMI, parity and global ancestry. We evaluated the association between global ancestry and POP using multiple logistic regression. European ancestry at the individual level was not associated with POP risk. Case-only and case-control local ancestry analyses identified two ancestry-specific loci that may be associated with POP. One locus (Chromosome 15q26.2) achieved empirically-estimated statistical significance and was associated with decreased POP odds (considering grade ≥2 POP) with each unit increase in European ancestry (OR: 0.35; 95% CI: 0.30, 0.57; p-value = 1.48x10-5). This region includes RGMA, a potent regulator of the BMP family of genes. The second locus (Chromosome 1q42.1-q42.3) was associated with increased POP odds with each unit increase in European ancestry (Odds ratio [OR]: 1.69; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.28, 2.22; p-value = 1.93x10-4). Although this region did not reach statistical significance after considering multiple comparisons, it includes potentially relevant genes including TBCE, and ACTA1. Unique non-overlapping European and African ancestry-specific susceptibility loci may be associated with increased POP risk.
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Relationship Between Body Mass Index and Outcomes Among Hospitalized Patients With Community-Acquired Pneumonia.
Bramley AM, Reed C, Finelli L, Self WH, Ampofo K, Arnold SR, Williams DJ, Grijalva CG, Anderson EJ, Stockmann C, Trabue C, Fakhran S, Balk R, McCullers JA, Pavia AT, Edwards KM, Wunderink RG, Jain S, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Etiology of Pneumonia in the Community (EPIC) Study Team
(2017) J Infect Dis 215: 1873-1882
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Asthma, Body Mass Index, Child, Child, Preschool, Community-Acquired Infections, Comorbidity, Female, Hospitalization, Humans, Intensive Care Units, Length of Stay, Male, Middle Aged, Obesity, Odds Ratio, Pneumonia, Prospective Studies, Respiration, Artificial, Treatment Outcome, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added July 27, 2018
Background - The effect of body mass index (BMI) on community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) severity is unclear.
Methods - We investigated the relationship between BMI and CAP outcomes (hospital length of stay [LOS], intensive care unit [ICU] admission, and invasive mechanical ventilation) in hospitalized CAP patients from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Etiology of Pneumonia in the Community (EPIC) study, adjusting for age, demographics, underlying conditions, and smoking status (adults only).
Results - Compared with normal-weight children, odds of ICU admission were higher in children who were overweight (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.7; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1-2.8) or obese (aOR, 2.1; 95% CI, 1.4-3.2), and odds of mechanical ventilation were higher in children with obesity (aOR, 2.7; 95% CI, 1.3-5.6). When stratified by asthma (presence/absence), these findings remained significant only in children with asthma. Compared with normal-weight adults, odds of LOS >3 days were higher in adults who were underweight (aOR, 1.6; 95% CI, 1.1-2.4), and odds of mechanical ventilation were lowest in adults who were overweight (aOR, 0.5; 95% CI, .3-.9).
Conclusions - Children who were overweight or obese, particularly those with asthma, had higher odds of ICU admission or mechanical ventilation. In contrast, adults who were underweight had longer LOS. These results underscore the complex relationship between BMI and CAP outcomes.
Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2017. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.
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Molecular dissection of effector mechanisms of RAS-mediated resistance to anti-EGFR antibody therapy.
Kasper S, Reis H, Ziegler S, Nothdurft S, Mueller A, Goetz M, Wiesweg M, Phasue J, Ting S, Wieczorek S, Even A, Worm K, Pogorzelski M, Breitenbuecher S, Meiler J, Paul A, Trarbach T, Schmid KW, Breitenbuecher F, Schuler M
(2017) Oncotarget 8: 45898-45917
MeSH Terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Immunological, Apoptosis, Biomarkers, Cell Line, Tumor, Colorectal Neoplasms, Drug Resistance, Neoplasm, ErbB Receptors, Exons, Genes, ras, Humans, Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases, Mutation, Odds Ratio, Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases, Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt, Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-bcl-2, Signal Transduction
Show Abstract · Added March 17, 2018
Monoclonal antibodies targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), cetuximab and panitumumab, are a mainstay of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) treatment. However, a significant number of patients suffer from primary or acquired resistance. RAS mutations are negative predictors of clinical efficacy of anti-EGFR antibodies in patients with mCRC. Oncogenic RAS activates the MAPK and PI3K/AKT pathways, which are considered the main effectors of resistance. However, the relative impact of these pathways in RAS-mutant CRC is less defined. A better mechanistic understanding of RAS-mediated resistance may guide development of rational intervention strategies. To this end we developed cancer models for functional dissection of resistance to anti-EGFR therapy in vitro and in vivo. To selectively activate MAPK- or AKT-signaling we expressed conditionally activatable RAF-1 and AKT in cancer cells. We found that either pathway independently protected sensitive cancer models against anti-EGFR antibody treatment in vitro and in vivo. RAF-1- and AKT-mediated resistance was associated with increased expression of anti-apoptotic BCL-2 proteins. Biomarkers of MAPK and PI3K/AKT pathway activation correlated with inferior outcome in a cohort of mCRC patients receiving cetuximab-based therapy. Dual pharmacologic inhibition of PI3K and MEK successfully sensitized primary resistant CRC models to anti-EGFR therapy. In conclusion, combined targeting of MAPK and PI3K/AKT signaling, but not single pathways, may be required to enhance the efficacy of anti-EGFR antibody therapy in patients with RAS-mutated CRC as well as in RAS wild type tumors with clinical resistance.
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Investigating the Genetic Architecture of the PR Interval Using Clinical Phenotypes.
Mosley JD, Shoemaker MB, Wells QS, Darbar D, Shaffer CM, Edwards TL, Bastarache L, McCarty CA, Thompson W, Chute CG, Jarvik GP, Crosslin DR, Larson EB, Kullo IJ, Pacheco JA, Peissig PL, Brilliant MH, Linneman JG, Witte JS, Denny JC, Roden DM
(2017) Circ Cardiovasc Genet 10:
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Atrial Fibrillation, Body Mass Index, Case-Control Studies, Electrocardiography, Female, Genotype, Humans, Male, Metabolic Syndrome, Middle Aged, Odds Ratio, Phenotype, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Risk Factors, Waist Circumference, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added April 26, 2017
BACKGROUND - One potential use for the PR interval is as a biomarker of disease risk. We hypothesized that quantifying the shared genetic architectures of the PR interval and a set of clinical phenotypes would identify genetic mechanisms contributing to PR variability and identify diseases associated with a genetic predictor of PR variability.
METHODS AND RESULTS - We used ECG measurements from the ARIC study (Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities; n=6731 subjects) and 63 genetically modulated diseases from the eMERGE network (Electronic Medical Records and Genomics; n=12 978). We measured pairwise genetic correlations (rG) between PR phenotypes (PR interval, PR segment, P-wave duration) and each of the 63 phenotypes. The PR segment was genetically correlated with atrial fibrillation (rG=-0.88; =0.0009). An analysis of metabolic phenotypes in ARIC also showed that the P wave was genetically correlated with waist circumference (rG=0.47; =0.02). A genetically predicted PR interval phenotype based on 645 714 single-nucleotide polymorphisms was associated with atrial fibrillation (odds ratio=0.89 per SD change; 95% confidence interval, 0.83-0.95; =0.0006). The differing pattern of associations among the PR phenotypes is consistent with analyses that show that the genetic correlation between the P wave and PR segment was not significantly different from 0 (rG=-0.03 [0.16]).
CONCLUSIONS - The genetic architecture of the PR interval comprises modulators of atrial fibrillation risk and obesity.
© 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.
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Evaluating the role of race and medication in protection of uterine fibroids by type 2 diabetes exposure.
Velez Edwards DR, Hartmann KE, Wellons M, Shah A, Xu H, Edwards TL
(2017) BMC Womens Health 17: 28
MeSH Terms: Adult, African Continental Ancestry Group, Aged, Case-Control Studies, Cohort Studies, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Humans, Leiomyoma, Middle Aged, Odds Ratio, United States
Show Abstract · Added April 26, 2017
BACKGROUND - Uterine fibroids (UF) affect 77% of women by menopause, and account for $9.4 billion in annual healthcare costs. Type-2-diabetes (T2D) has inconsistently associated with protection from UFs in prior studies. To further evaluate the relationship between T2D and UFs we tested for association between T2D and UF risk in a large clinical population as well as the potential differences due to T2D medications and interaction with race.
METHODS - This nested case-control study is derived from a clinical cohort. Our outcome was UF case-control status and our exposure was T2D. UF outcomes and T2D exposure were classified using validated electronic medical record (EMR) algorithms. Logistic regression, adjusted for covariates, was used to model the association between T2D diagnosis and UF risk. Secondary analyses were performed evaluating the interaction between T2D exposure and race and stratifying T2D exposed subjects by T2D medication being taken.
RESULTS - We identified 3,789 subjects with UF outcomes (608 UF cases and 3,181 controls), 714 were diabetic and 3,075 were non-diabetic. We observed a nominally significant interaction between T2D exposure and race in adjusted models (interaction p = 0.083). Race stratified analyses demonstrated more protection by T2D exposure on UF risk among European Americans (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 0.50, 95% CI 0.35 to 0.72) than African Americans (aOR = 0.76, 95% CI 0.50 to 1.17). We also observed a protective effect by T2D regardless of type of T2D medication being taken, with slightly more protection among subjects on insulin treatments (European Americans aOR = 0.42, 95% CI 0.26 to 0.68; African Americans aOR = 0.60, 95% CI 0.36 to 1.01).
CONCLUSIONS - These data, conducted in a large population of UF cases and controls, support prior studies that have found a protective association between diabetes presence and UF risk and is further modified by race. Protection from UFs by T2D exposure was observed regardless of medication type with slightly more protection among insulin users. Further mechanistic research in larger cohorts is necessary to reconcile the potential role of T2D in UF risk.
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A Low-Frequency Inactivating Variant Enriched in the Finnish Population Is Associated With Fasting Insulin Levels and Type 2 Diabetes Risk.
Manning A, Highland HM, Gasser J, Sim X, Tukiainen T, Fontanillas P, Grarup N, Rivas MA, Mahajan A, Locke AE, Cingolani P, Pers TH, Viñuela A, Brown AA, Wu Y, Flannick J, Fuchsberger C, Gamazon ER, Gaulton KJ, Im HK, Teslovich TM, Blackwell TW, Bork-Jensen J, Burtt NP, Chen Y, Green T, Hartl C, Kang HM, Kumar A, Ladenvall C, Ma C, Moutsianas L, Pearson RD, Perry JRB, Rayner NW, Robertson NR, Scott LJ, van de Bunt M, Eriksson JG, Jula A, Koskinen S, Lehtimäki T, Palotie A, Raitakari OT, Jacobs SBR, Wessel J, Chu AY, Scott RA, Goodarzi MO, Blancher C, Buck G, Buck D, Chines PS, Gabriel S, Gjesing AP, Groves CJ, Hollensted M, Huyghe JR, Jackson AU, Jun G, Justesen JM, Mangino M, Murphy J, Neville M, Onofrio R, Small KS, Stringham HM, Trakalo J, Banks E, Carey J, Carneiro MO, DePristo M, Farjoun Y, Fennell T, Goldstein JI, Grant G, Hrabé de Angelis M, Maguire J, Neale BM, Poplin R, Purcell S, Schwarzmayr T, Shakir K, Smith JD, Strom TM, Wieland T, Lindstrom J, Brandslund I, Christensen C, Surdulescu GL, Lakka TA, Doney ASF, Nilsson P, Wareham NJ, Langenberg C, Varga TV, Franks PW, Rolandsson O, Rosengren AH, Farook VS, Thameem F, Puppala S, Kumar S, Lehman DM, Jenkinson CP, Curran JE, Hale DE, Fowler SP, Arya R, DeFronzo RA, Abboud HE, Syvänen AC, Hicks PJ, Palmer ND, Ng MCY, Bowden DW, Freedman BI, Esko T, Mägi R, Milani L, Mihailov E, Metspalu A, Narisu N, Kinnunen L, Bonnycastle LL, Swift A, Pasko D, Wood AR, Fadista J, Pollin TI, Barzilai N, Atzmon G, Glaser B, Thorand B, Strauch K, Peters A, Roden M, Müller-Nurasyid M, Liang L, Kriebel J, Illig T, Grallert H, Gieger C, Meisinger C, Lannfelt L, Musani SK, Griswold M, Taylor HA, Wilson G, Correa A, Oksa H, Scott WR, Afzal U, Tan ST, Loh M, Chambers JC, Sehmi J, Kooner JS, Lehne B, Cho YS, Lee JY, Han BG, Käräjämäki A, Qi Q, Qi L, Huang J, Hu FB, Melander O, Orho-Melander M, Below JE, Aguilar D, Wong TY, Liu J, Khor CC, Chia KS, Lim WY, Cheng CY, Chan E, Tai ES, Aung T, Linneberg A, Isomaa B, Meitinger T, Tuomi T, Hakaste L, Kravic J, Jørgensen ME, Lauritzen T, Deloukas P, Stirrups KE, Owen KR, Farmer AJ, Frayling TM, O'Rahilly SP, Walker M, Levy JC, Hodgkiss D, Hattersley AT, Kuulasmaa T, Stančáková A, Barroso I, Bharadwaj D, Chan J, Chandak GR, Daly MJ, Donnelly PJ, Ebrahim SB, Elliott P, Fingerlin T, Froguel P, Hu C, Jia W, Ma RCW, McVean G, Park T, Prabhakaran D, Sandhu M, Scott J, Sladek R, Tandon N, Teo YY, Zeggini E, Watanabe RM, Koistinen HA, Kesaniemi YA, Uusitupa M, Spector TD, Salomaa V, Rauramaa R, Palmer CNA, Prokopenko I, Morris AD, Bergman RN, Collins FS, Lind L, Ingelsson E, Tuomilehto J, Karpe F, Groop L, Jørgensen T, Hansen T, Pedersen O, Kuusisto J, Abecasis G, Bell GI, Blangero J, Cox NJ, Duggirala R, Seielstad M, Wilson JG, Dupuis J, Ripatti S, Hanis CL, Florez JC, Mohlke KL, Meigs JB, Laakso M, Morris AP, Boehnke M, Altshuler D, McCarthy MI, Gloyn AL, Lindgren CM
(2017) Diabetes 66: 2019-2032
MeSH Terms: African Americans, Alleles, Asian Continental Ancestry Group, Case-Control Studies, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, European Continental Ancestry Group, Fasting, Finland, Gene Frequency, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Genotype, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Insulin, Insulin Resistance, Odds Ratio, Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt
Show Abstract · Added April 13, 2017
To identify novel coding association signals and facilitate characterization of mechanisms influencing glycemic traits and type 2 diabetes risk, we analyzed 109,215 variants derived from exome array genotyping together with an additional 390,225 variants from exome sequence in up to 39,339 normoglycemic individuals from five ancestry groups. We identified a novel association between the coding variant (p.Pro50Thr) in and fasting plasma insulin (FI), a gene in which rare fully penetrant mutations are causal for monogenic glycemic disorders. The low-frequency allele is associated with a 12% increase in FI levels. This variant is present at 1.1% frequency in Finns but virtually absent in individuals from other ancestries. Carriers of the FI-increasing allele had increased 2-h insulin values, decreased insulin sensitivity, and increased risk of type 2 diabetes (odds ratio 1.05). In cellular studies, the AKT2-Thr50 protein exhibited a partial loss of function. We extend the allelic spectrum for coding variants in associated with disorders of glucose homeostasis and demonstrate bidirectional effects of variants within the pleckstrin homology domain of .
© 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.
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