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Results: 11 to 17 of 17

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Interactions between the cardiovascular and pain regulatory systems: an updated review of mechanisms and possible alterations in chronic pain.
Bruehl S, Chung OY
(2004) Neurosci Biobehav Rev 28: 395-414
MeSH Terms: Adaptation, Physiological, Animals, Blood Pressure, Cardiovascular System, Chronic Disease, Humans, Nociceptors, Pain, Pain Threshold, Pressoreceptors
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
Endogenous pain regulatory system dysfunction appears to play a role in the maintenance of chronic pain. An important component of the pain regulatory process is the functional interaction between the cardiovascular and pain regulatory systems, which results in an association between elevated resting blood pressure (BP) and diminished acute pain sensitivity. This BP/pain sensitivity relationship is proposed to reflect a homeostatic feedback loop helping restore arousal levels in the presence of painful stimuli. Evidence is emerging that this normally adaptive BP/pain sensitivity relationship is significantly altered in chronic pain conditions, affecting responsiveness to both acute and chronic pain stimuli. Several mechanisms that may underlie this adaptive relationship in healthy individuals are overviewed, including endogenous opioid, noradrenergic, and baroreceptor-related mechanisms. Theoretical models are presented regarding how chronic pain-related alterations in the mechanisms above and increased pain facilatory system activity (central sensitization) may contribute to altered BP/pain sensitivity interactions in chronic pain. Clinical implications are discussed.
0 Communities
1 Members
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10 MeSH Terms
Growing pains: the cytoskeleton as a critical regulator of pain plasticity.
Bhave G, Gereau RW
(2003) Neuron 39: 577-9
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cytoskeleton, Dinoprostone, Epinephrine, Neuronal Plasticity, Neurons, Afferent, Nociceptors, Pain, Receptors, Chemokine, Signal Transduction
Show Abstract · Added August 12, 2015
Inflammatory mediators act on peripheral sensory neurons to produce pain and hypersensitivity after tissue injury. In this issue of Neuron, Dina et al. report that inflammatory mediators, such as epinephrine and prostaglandins, appear to couple to specific G protein-coupled receptor signaling pathways through plastic interactions with the cytoskeleton.
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10 MeSH Terms
Anger and pain sensitivity in chronic low back pain patients and pain-free controls: the role of endogenous opioids.
Bruehl S, Burns JW, Chung OY, Ward P, Johnson B
(2002) Pain 99: 223-33
MeSH Terms: Acute Disease, Anger, Chronic Disease, Cross-Over Studies, Depression, Double-Blind Method, Fingers, Humans, Low Back Pain, Multivariate Analysis, Naloxone, Narcotic Antagonists, Nociceptors, Opioid Peptides, Pain Measurement, Pain Threshold, Placebos, Pressure
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
The experience of anger (i.e. trait anger) and anger management style (i.e. anger-in, anger-out) are related to sensitivity to acute and chronic pain stimuli, although underlying mechanisms are unknown. This study tested whether anger variables are associated with impaired endogenous opioid antinociceptive activity, and whether these relationships differed between chronic pain patients and healthy normals. Forty-three chronic low back pain (LBP) sufferers and 45 pain-free normals received opioid blockade (8 mg naloxone i.v.) or placebo blockade (saline) in randomized, counterbalanced order in separate sessions. During each session, subjects participated in a 1-min finger pressure pain task followed by an ischemic forearm pain task (maximum duration 5 min), providing pain intensity ratings during and immediately following each task. As a measure of opioid antinociceptive function, drug effects were derived by subtracting placebo from blockade condition pain ratings. Multivariate general linear model analyses indicated that anger-out, but not anger-in, had significant main effects on both finger pressure drug effects (P < 0.05) and ischemic task drug effects (P < 0.05). As hypothesized, high anger-out scores were associated with an absence of opioid analgesia during the acute pain tasks; low anger-out scores were associated with effective opioid analgesia. A similar non-significant trend was noted for trait anger on finger pressure drug effects (P < 0.06). Anger-out x LBP/normal interactions were non-significant, suggesting that links between anger-out and drug effects were similar for patients and normals. Controlling for depression did not eliminate the significant relationship between anger-out and drug effects. Findings suggest that anger-in and anger-out affect pain sensitivity through different mechanisms: only the effects of anger-out may be mediated by endogenous opioid dysfunction.
Copyright 2002 International Association for the Study of Pain
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1 Members
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18 MeSH Terms
cAMP-dependent protein kinase regulates desensitization of the capsaicin receptor (VR1) by direct phosphorylation.
Bhave G, Zhu W, Wang H, Brasier DJ, Oxford GS, Gereau RW
(2002) Neuron 35: 721-31
MeSH Terms: Amino Acid Sequence, Animals, Binding Sites, CHO Cells, COS Cells, Capsaicin, Central Nervous System, Cricetinae, Cyclic AMP, Cyclic AMP-Dependent Protein Kinases, Mutation, Neurons, Afferent, Nociceptors, Pain, Phosphorylation, Protein Structure, Tertiary, Receptors, Drug, Recombinant Fusion Proteins, Serine, Transfection
Show Abstract · Added March 24, 2014
The capsaicin receptor, VR1 (also known as TRPV1), is a ligand-gated ion channel expressed on nociceptive sensory neurons that responds to noxious thermal and chemical stimuli. Capsaicin responses in sensory neurons exhibit robust potentiation by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). In this study, we demonstrate that PKA reduces VR1 desensitization and directly phosphorylates VR1. In vitro phosphorylation, phosphopeptide mapping, and protein sequencing of VR1 cytoplasmic domains delineate several candidate PKA phosphorylation sites. Electrophysiological analysis of phosphorylation site mutants clearly pinpoints Ser116 as the residue responsible for PKA-dependent modulation of VR1. Given the significant roles of VR1 and PKA in inflammatory pain hypersensitivity, VR1 phosphorylation at Ser116 by PKA may represent an important molecular mechanism involved in the regulation of VR1 function after tissue injury.
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20 MeSH Terms
Theoretical review: altered pain regulatory systems in chronic pain.
Bruehl S, McCubbin JA, Harden RN
(1999) Neurosci Biobehav Rev 23: 877-90
MeSH Terms: Animals, Blood Pressure, Cardiovascular System, Chronic Disease, Humans, Nociceptors, Pain
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
This review synthesizes the existing literature regarding the relationship between resting blood pressure and pain sensitivity, and the literature indicating possible endogenous opioid dysfunction in chronic pain. Adaptive interactions between the cardiovascular and pain regulatory systems occur in healthy individuals, with greater blood pressure associated with decreased acute pain sensitivity. Endogenous opioids appear necessary for full expression of this relationship. There is ample evidence indicating diminished endogenous opioid CSF/plasma levels in chronic pain patients, yet little is known about the functional effects of these opioid changes. A theoretical model is proposed based upon the literature reviewed suggesting progressive dysfunction in endogenous opioid systems with increasing chronic pain duration. This dysfunction is hypothesized to result in dysregulation of normally adaptive relationships between the cardiovascular and pain regulatory systems, resulting in increased chronic pain intensity and increased acute pain sensitivity among chronic pain patients. Preliminary data are consistent with the hypothesis of progressive opioid changes resulting in dysfunctional alterations in the adaptive blood pressure-pain relationship. Clinical implications of this theory are discussed.
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1 Members
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7 MeSH Terms
Ultrastructural analysis of ectopic synaptic boutons arising from peripherally regenerated primary afferent fibers.
Koerber HR, Mirnics K, Kavookjian AM, Light AR
(1999) J Neurophysiol 81: 1636-44
MeSH Terms: Animals, Axotomy, Cats, Electrophysiology, Female, Male, Membrane Potentials, Microscopy, Electron, Nerve Regeneration, Neurons, Afferent, Nociceptors, Pain, Presynaptic Terminals
Show Abstract · Added February 12, 2015
The central axons of peripherally regenerated Abeta primary sensory neurons were impaled in the dorsal columns of alpha-chloralose-anesthetized cats 9-12 mo after axotomy. The adequate peripheral stimulus was determined, and the afferent fibers intracellularly stimulated while simultaneously recording the resulting cord dorsum potentials (CDPs). Fibers that successfully had reinnervated the skin responded to light tactile stimulation, and evoked CDPs that suggested dorsally located boutons were stained intracellularly with horseradish peroxidase (HRP). Two HRP-stained regenerated Abeta afferent fibers were recovered that supported large numbers of axon collaterals and swellings in laminae I, IIo, and IIi. Sections containing the ectopic collateral fibers and terminals in the superficial dorsal horn were embedded in plastic. Analyses of serial ultrathin sections revealed that ectopic projections from both regenerated fibers supported numerous synaptic boutons filled with clear round vesicles, a few large dense core vesicles (LDCVs) and several mitochondria (>3). All profiles examined in serial sections (19) formed one to three asymmetric axo-dendritic contacts. Unmyelinated portions of ectopic fibers giving rise to en passant and terminal boutons often contained numerous clear round vesicles. Several boutons (47%) received asymmetric contacts from axon terminals containing pleomorphic vesicles. These results strongly suggest that regenerated Abeta fibers activated by light tactile stimuli support functional connections in the superficial dorsal horn that have distinct ultrastructural features. In addition, the appearance of LDCVs suggests that primary sensory neurons are capable of changing their neurochemical phenotype.
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1 Members
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13 MeSH Terms
Basal and stimulated sympathetic responses after epinephrine: no evidence of augmented responses.
Stein CM, He HB, Wood AJ
(1998) Hypertension 32: 1016-21
MeSH Terms: Adult, Epinephrine, Hemodynamics, Humans, Male, Nociceptors, Renin, Rest, Single-Blind Method, Stress, Physiological
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
Delayed facilitation of norepinephrine release through the action of epinephrine (NE) at presynaptic beta-adrenoceptors has been postulated to account for the delayed hemodynamic effects of epinephrine and to be a mechanism causally related to the development of hypertension. To determine whether a short-term increase in epinephrine concentrations resulted in subsequent facilitation of sympathetic responses, 9 healthy subjects (age, 21+/-0.9 years) were studied at rest and during physiological stress on 2 occasions when they received an infusion of either saline or epinephrine (20 ng/kg per minute) in random order. Heart rate, blood pressure, forearm blood flow, epinephrine concentrations, and NE spillover were measured at rest, during mental stress (Stroop test), and during a cold pressor test. Measurements were performed before, during the 1-hour infusion of epinephrine or placebo, and 1 hour after the infusion. A radioisotope dilution method was used to measure NE spillover. Hemodynamic measurements and NE spillover were increased during the infusion of epinephrine, but 1 hour after discontinuation of epinephrine there was no significant augmentation of hemodynamic or sympathetic responses. NE spillover 1 hour after saline or epinephrine infusion was similar (0.85+/-0.2 versus 0. 87+/-0.2 microg/min; P=0.92). In addition, there was no delayed facilitation of stress-induced hemodynamic or NE responses after epinephrine. These findings do not support the hypothesis that epinephrine results in delayed facilitation of NE release.
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10 MeSH Terms