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The publication data currently available has been vetted by Vanderbilt faculty, staff, administrators and trainees. The data itself is retrieved directly from NCBI's PubMed and is automatically updated on a weekly basis to ensure accuracy and completeness.

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Results: 11 to 20 of 24

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Factors influencing prostate cancer screening in low-income African Americans in Tennessee.
Patel K, Kenerson D, Wang H, Brown B, Pinkerton H, Burress M, Cooper L, Canto M, Ukoli F, Hargreaves M
(2010) J Health Care Poor Underserved 21: 114-26
MeSH Terms: African Americans, Aged, Community Health Services, Early Detection of Cancer, Health Services Accessibility, Health Surveys, Humans, Income, Male, Middle Aged, Needs Assessment, Patient Acceptance of Health Care, Prostatic Neoplasms, Socioeconomic Factors, Tennessee, Urban Health
Show Abstract · Added March 27, 2014
This study examined demographic and lifestyle factors that influenced decisions to get screened for prostate cancer in low-income African Americans in three urban Tennessee cities. It also examined obstacles to getting screened. As part of the Meharry Community Networks Program (CNP) needs assessment, a 123-item community survey was administered to assess demographic characteristics, health care access and utilization, and screening practices for various cancers in low-income African Americans. For this study, only African American men 45 years and older (n=293) were selected from the Meharry CNP community survey database. Participants from Nashville, those who were older, obese, and who had health insurance were more likely to have been screened (p<.05). Additionally, there were associations between obstacles to screening (such as cost and transportation) and geographic region (p<.05). Educational interventions aimed at improving prostate cancer knowledge and screening rates should incorporate information about obstacles to and predictors of screening.
0 Communities
1 Members
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16 MeSH Terms
Using a participatory research process to address disproportionate Hispanic cancer burden.
Hull PC, Canedo JR, Reece MC, Lira I, Reyes F, Garcia E, Juarez P, Williams E, Husaini BA
(2010) J Health Care Poor Underserved 21: 95-113
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Community-Based Participatory Research, Community-Institutional Relations, Cooperative Behavior, Female, Health Planning, Health Status Disparities, Health Surveys, Hispanic Americans, Humans, Interviews as Topic, Male, Middle Aged, Needs Assessment, Neoplasms, Tennessee, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
Community-based participatory research (CBPR) offers great potential for increasing the impact of research on reducing cancer health disparities. This article reports how the Community Outreach Core (COC) of the Meharry-Vanderbilt-Tennessee State University (TSU) Cancer Partnership has collaborated with community partners to develop and implement CBPR. The COC, Progreso Community Center, and Nashville Latino Health Coalition jointly developed and conducted the 2007 Hispanic Health in Nashville Survey as a participatory needs assessment to guide planning for subsequent CBPR projects and community health initiatives. Trained community and student interviewers surveyed 500 Hispanic adults in the Nashville area, using a convenience sampling method. In light of the survey results, NLHC decided to focus in the area of cancer on the primary prevention of cervical cancer. The survey led to a subsequent formative CBPR research project to develop an intervention, then to funding of a CBPR pilot intervention study to test the intervention.
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1 Members
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18 MeSH Terms
Community-based organizational capacity building as a strategy to reduce racial health disparities.
Griffith DM, Allen JO, DeLoney EH, Robinson K, Lewis EY, Campbell B, Morrel-Samuels S, Sparks A, Zimmerman MA, Reischl T
(2010) J Prim Prev 31: 31-9
MeSH Terms: African Americans, Capacity Building, Community Health Services, Community-Institutional Relations, HIV Infections, Health Status Disparities, Humans, Michigan, Needs Assessment, Organizational Case Studies, Primary Prevention
Show Abstract · Added March 27, 2014
One of the biggest challenges facing racial health disparities research is identifying how and where to implement effective, sustainable interventions. Community-based organizations (CBOs) and community-academic partnerships are frequently utilized as vehicles to conduct community health promotion interventions without attending to the viability and sustainability of CBOs or capacity inequities among partners. Utilizing organizational empowerment theory, this paper describes an intervention designed to increase the capacity of CBOs and community-academic partnerships to implement strategies to improve community health. The Capacity Building project illustrates how capacity building interventions can help to identify community health needs, promote community empowerment, and reduce health disparities.
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1 Members
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11 MeSH Terms
Disaster and end-stage renal disease: targeting vulnerable patients for improved outcomes.
Abdel-Kader K, Unruh ML
(2009) Kidney Int 75: 1131-1133
MeSH Terms: Disaster Planning, Disasters, Humans, Kidney Failure, Chronic, Needs Assessment, Relief Work, Renal Dialysis
Show Abstract · Added March 6, 2014
Natural catastrophes disproportionately affect ill and socioeconomically disadvantaged populations. Patients with end-stage renal disease are particularly vulnerable. Recent events have led to the creation of national and international institutions that provide assistance before and during such tragedies. Disaster planning by dialysis centers, providers, and patients can also help improve outcomes during a catastrophe. Greater governmental resource allocation is needed to adequately prepare for disasters and to help the disadvantaged during the relief and recovery phases.
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7 MeSH Terms
Environmental noise sources and interventions to minimize them: a tale of 2 hospitals.
Dube JA, Barth MM, Cmiel CA, Cutshall SM, Olson SM, Sulla SJ, Nesbitt JC, Sobczak SC, Holland DE
(2008) J Nurs Care Qual 23: 216-24; quiz 225-6
MeSH Terms: Attitude of Health Personnel, Attitude to Health, Data Collection, Environmental Monitoring, Health Facility Environment, Hospital Communication Systems, Humans, Inpatients, Minnesota, Needs Assessment, Noise, Nursing Evaluation Research, Nursing Methodology Research, Nursing Staff, Hospital, Outcome and Process Assessment, Health Care, Program Evaluation, Qualitative Research, Risk Assessment, Risk Factors, Sound Spectrography, Time Factors, Total Quality Management
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
Noise has been shown to interfere with the healing process and can disrupt the patient's experience. This study assessed patients' and staff's perceptions of noise levels and sources in the hospital environment and identified interventions to reduce the noise level. The interventions significantly reduced noise as perceived by patients and staff. Identification of a structured process to identify noise sources and standardization of noise measurement methods can improve the patient hospital experience.
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1 Members
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22 MeSH Terms
Resource clusters and variation in physical restraint use.
Minnick AF, Fogg L, Mion LC, Catrambone C, Johnson ME
(2007) J Nurs Scholarsh 39: 363-70
MeSH Terms: Acute Disease, Adult, Capital Expenditures, Cluster Analysis, Data Collection, Data Interpretation, Statistical, Health Resources, Hospital Units, Humans, Intensive Care Units, Interior Design and Furnishings, Multivariate Analysis, Needs Assessment, Nursing Administration Research, Nursing Staff, Hospital, Outcome and Process Assessment, Health Care, Personnel Staffing and Scheduling, Practice Patterns, Physicians', Regression Analysis, Restraint, Physical, Sensitivity and Specificity, Surveys and Questionnaires, United States
Show Abstract · Added January 20, 2015
PURPOSE - To describe (a) the extent of inter- and intrainstitutional variation in labor, capital, and process-of-care variables related to nursing service on U.S. adult acute and intensive care units; (b) the extent to which resource clustering exists; and (c) an analysis of resource cluster role that explains variation in physical restraint rates.
DESIGN - Descriptive.
METHODS - Staff at 82 adult acute care and 55 intensive care units from 40 randomly selected U.S. hospitals provided data about more than 100 capital, labor, and process variables via (a) a staff nurse survey, and (b) interviews with unit leaders and measurement of unit design. These data described resources during the period in which physical restraint rate was established via direct observation.
FINDINGS - Depending on the resource variable, 7% to 57% of hospitals in which more than one ICU was studied showed resource variation between their ICUs; the comparable statistics for adult acute units were 5% to 45%. Cluster analysis indicated a two-cluster solution for ICUs and a three-cluster solution for non-ICUs. ICU cluster assignment varied within 16% of hospitals in which more than one ICU was studied. Non-ICU cluster assignment varied within 20% of hospitals. Physical restraint use was best explained by patient characteristics, not resource clusters or individual resources.
CONCLUSIONS - Studies of outcomes that are the product of a single unit must include measurement of resources at the unit level, assuming equal resources among units of similar types within a hospital is unwarranted. Further research regarding the effect of resource clusters on nurse sensitive outcomes is suggested.
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23 MeSH Terms
Exploring the role of GIS during community health assessment problem solving: experiences of public health professionals.
Scotch M, Parmanto B, Gadd CS, Sharma RK
(2006) Int J Health Geogr 5: 39
MeSH Terms: Community Health Planning, Geographic Information Systems, Health Status, Humans, Needs Assessment
Show Abstract · Added January 20, 2015
BACKGROUND - A Community health assessment (CHA) involves the use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) in conjunction with other software to analyze health and population data and perform numerical-spatial problem solving. There has been little research on identifying how public health professionals integrate this software during typical problem solving scenarios. A better understanding of this is needed to answer the "What" and the "How". The "What" identifies the specific software being used and the "How" explains the way they are integrated together during problem solving steps. This level of understanding will highlight the role of GIS utilization during problem solving and suggest to developers how GIS can be enhanced to better support data analysis during community health assessment.
RESULTS - An online survey was developed to identify the information technology used during CHA analysis. The tasks were broken down into steps and for our analysis these steps were categorized by action: Data Management/Access, Data Navigation, Geographic Comparison, Detection of Spatial Boundaries, Spatial Modelling, and Ranking Analysis. 27 CHA professionals completed the survey, with the majority of participants (14) being from health departments. Statistical software (e.g. SPSS) was the most popular software for all but one of the types of steps. For this step (detection of spatial boundaries), GIS was identified as the most popular technology.
CONCLUSION - Most CHA professionals indicated they use statistical software in conjunction with GIS. The statistical software appears to drive the analysis, while GIS is used primarily for simple spatial display (and not complex spatial analysis). This purpose of this survey was to thoroughly examine into the process of problem solving during community health assessment data analysis and to gauge how GIS is integrated with other software for this purpose. These findings suggest that GIS is used more for spatial display while other software such as statistical packages (the "What") are used to drive data management, data navigation, and data calculation (the "How"). Focusing at the level of how public health problems are solved, can shed light on how GIS technology can be enhanced to encompass a stronger role during community health assessment problem solving.
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5 MeSH Terms
Obesity is a risk factor for reporting homebound status among community-dwelling older persons.
Jensen GL, Silver HJ, Roy MA, Callahan E, Still C, Dupont W
(2006) Obesity (Silver Spring) 14: 509-17
MeSH Terms: Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Cohort Studies, Female, Health Status, Homebound Persons, Humans, Interviews as Topic, Longitudinal Studies, Male, Mass Screening, Multivariate Analysis, Needs Assessment, Obesity, Predictive Value of Tests, Prevalence, Prognosis, Risk Factors, Surveys and Questionnaires
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
OBJECTIVE - To test the a priori hypothesis that obesity is a predictor of risk for reporting homebound status.
RESEARCH METHODS AND PROCEDURES - A longitudinal cohort study was conducted with 21,645 community-dwelling men and women 65 to 97 years old. A nutrition risk screen was administered baseline between 1994 and 1999 and again 3 to 4 years later. Univariate analyses identified baseline variables associated with subsequent reporting of homebound status. Multivariable logistic regression models were created to identify baseline variables that were significant independent predictors of reporting homebound status.
RESULTS - At baseline, 24% of the cohort had BMI > or = 30. There were 12,834 (45% men) respondents at follow-up (68% response). Non-responders at follow-up differed little from responders except for greater baseline age (72.2 +/- 6.2 vs. 71.4 +/- 5.6 years, p < 0.001) and reporting of any functional limitations (9.2% vs. 4.9%, p < 0.001). At follow-up, those who reported homebound status (n = 169) were significantly (p < 0.001) older (80.3 +/- 7.3 vs. 75.1 +/- 5.5 years) and more likely to report functional limitations (83.4% vs. 10.8%). Univariate analyses identified 16 baseline variables that were eliminated stepwise until five significant independent predictors remained: age > or = 75 years (2.21, 1.55 to 3.15/odds ratio, 95% confidence interval), BMI > or = 35 (1.75, 1.04 to 2.96), poor appetite (2.50, 1.29 to 4.86), low income (1.59, 1.00 to 2.56), and any functional limitation (10.67, 7.36 to 15.46).
DISCUSSION - Obesity remained a significant independent predictor for reporting homebound status and should be considered in screening of older populations and in the planning, implementation, and evaluation of services for homebound older persons.
0 Communities
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19 MeSH Terms
Development of multidimensional scales to measure key leaders' perceptions of community capacity and organizational capacity for teen pregnancy prevention.
Griffin SF, Reininger BM, Parra-Medina D, Evans AE, Sanderson M, Vincent ML
(2005) Fam Community Health 28: 307-19
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Community Health Services, Community Participation, Female, Humans, Leadership, Needs Assessment, Pregnancy, Pregnancy in Adolescence, Psychometrics, Research Design, Rural Population
Show Abstract · Added March 11, 2014
This study discusses the development of scales to measure key leaders' self-reported involvement in community capacity building, perceptions of organizational capacity for teen pregnancy prevention, and the relationship between capacity and teen pregnancy rates. Data were collected from 1,516 key leaders across a rural southern state. Findings indicate that key leaders' perceptions of organizational capacity are related to their involvement in community capacity building efforts and community capacity is associated with teen pregnancy rates. This research represents progress toward measuring community and organizational capacity and may be used to inform future work focusing on developing quantitative measures of community capacity.
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12 MeSH Terms
The long-term impact of medical and socio-demographic factors on the quality of life of breast cancer survivors among Chinese women.
Cui Y, Shu XO, Gao Y, Cai H, Wen W, Ruan ZX, Jin F, Zheng W
(2004) Breast Cancer Res Treat 87: 135-47
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Breast Neoplasms, Case-Control Studies, China, Education, Female, Humans, Income, Middle Aged, Needs Assessment, Neoplasm Recurrence, Local, Quality of Life, Social Support, Survivors
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
Quality of life (QOL) has become an integral part of the modern assessment of cancer treatment in Western society. However, little is known about the QOL of Chinese breast cancer survivors. To evaluate the long-term impact of medical and socio-demographic factors on survivors' QOL, we conducted a population-based study of 1065 breast cancer survivors in Shanghai, China. The mean age at diagnosis was 48.1 years and the median survival time was 4.3 years for the study participants. The Generic Quality of Life Inventory was used to assess survivors' QOL. Multiple linear regression models were employed to analyze the associations of QOL outcomes with socio-demographic and medical factors. The results revealed that recurrence status, time since diagnosis, marital status, income and education all had an independent, significant association with overall QOL and differential domains of QOL. Age at diagnosis exhibited a dual effect on QOL, positively associated with material well-being and negatively associated with physical well-being. Stage of disease was only associated with social well-being, while the type of surgery was related to material well-being alone. No associations between QOL and chemotherapy or radiotherapy were found. Further, analyses by survival intervals suggested a domain-specific order of recovery of QOL after cancer treatment. These results fill gaps in the limited literature, and provide valuable information for physicians to target the specific needs of Chinese women with breast cancer, choose appropriate interventions at the optimal time, and develop strategies accordingly in terms of improvement of patient's QOL.
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15 MeSH Terms