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Genetic loss of GluN2B in D1-expressing cell types enhances long-term cocaine reward and potentiation of thalamo-accumbens synapses.
Joffe ME, Turner BD, Delpire E, Grueter BA
(2018) Neuropsychopharmacology 43: 2383-2389
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cocaine, Gene Deletion, Locomotion, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Transgenic, Nucleus Accumbens, Receptors, Dopamine D1, Receptors, N-Methyl-D-Aspartate, Reward, Thalamus
Show Abstract · Added April 2, 2019
Transient upregulation of GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors (R) in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) is proposed as an intermediate to long-term AMPAR plasticity associated with persistent cocaine-related behaviors. However, cell type- and input-specific contributions of GluN2B underlying lasting actions of cocaine remain to be elucidated. We utilized GluN2B cell type-specific knockouts and optogenetics to deconstruct the role of GluN2B in cocaine-induced NAc synaptic and behavioral plasticity. While reward learning was unaffected, loss of GluN2B in D1 dopamine receptor-expressing cells (D1) led to prolonged retention of reward memory. In control mice, prefrontal cortex (PFC)-D1(+) NAc AMPAR function was unaffected by cocaine exposure, while midline thalamus (mThal)-D1(+) NAc AMPAR function was potentiated but diminished after withdrawal. In D1-GluN2B mice, the potentiation of mThal-D1(+) NAc AMPAR function persisted following withdrawal, corresponding with continued expression of cocaine reward behavior. These data suggest NAc GluN2B-containing NMDARs serve a feedback role and may weaken reward-related memories.
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MeSH Terms
HCN channels in the hippocampus regulate active coping behavior.
Fisher DW, Han Y, Lyman KA, Heuermann RJ, Bean LA, Ybarra N, Foote KM, Dong H, Nicholson DA, Chetkovich DM
(2018) J Neurochem 146: 753-766
MeSH Terms: Adaptation, Psychological, Animals, Avoidance Learning, Depression, Disease Models, Animal, Exploratory Behavior, Hippocampus, Hyperpolarization-Activated Cyclic Nucleotide-Gated Channels, Male, Maze Learning, Membrane Proteins, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Transgenic, Microscopy, Electron, Peroxins, Pyramidal Cells, Swimming
Show Abstract · Added April 2, 2019
Active coping is an adaptive stress response that improves outcomes in medical and neuropsychiatric diseases. To date, most research into coping style has focused on neurotransmitter activity and little is known about the intrinsic excitability of neurons in the associated brain regions that facilitate coping. Previous studies have shown that HCN channels regulate neuronal excitability in pyramidal cells and that HCN channel current (I ) in the CA1 area increases with chronic mild stress. Reduction of I in the CA1 area leads to antidepressant-like behavior, and this region has been implicated in the regulation of coping style. We hypothesized that the antidepressant-like behavior achieved with CA1 knockdown of I is accompanied by increases in active coping. In this report, we found that global loss of TRIP8b, a necessary subunit for proper HCN channel localization in pyramidal cells, led to active coping behavior in numerous assays specific to coping style. We next employed a viral strategy using a dominant negative TRIP8b isoform to alter coping behavior by reducing HCN channel expression. This approach led to a robust reduction in I in CA1 pyramidal neurons and an increase in active coping. Together, these results establish that changes in HCN channel function in CA1 influences coping style.
© 2018 International Society for Neurochemistry.
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18 MeSH Terms
Anti-Insulin B Cells Are Poised for Antigen Presentation in Type 1 Diabetes.
Felton JL, Maseda D, Bonami RH, Hulbert C, Thomas JW
(2018) J Immunol 201: 861-873
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antigen Presentation, Autoantibodies, Autoantigens, B-Lymphocyte Subsets, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1, Female, Immune Tolerance, Inflammation, Insulin, Insulin Antibodies, Lymphocyte Activation, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred NOD, Mice, Transgenic, Receptors, Antigen, B-Cell
Show Abstract · Added July 20, 2018
Early breaches in B cell tolerance are central to type 1 diabetes progression in mouse and man. Conventional BCR transgenic mouse models (VH125.Tg NOD) reveal the power of B cell specificity to drive disease as APCs. However, in conventional fixed IgM models, comprehensive assessment of B cell development is limited. To provide more accurate insight into the developmental and functional fates of anti-insulin B cells, we generated a new NOD model (V125NOD) in which anti-insulin VDJH125 is targeted to the IgH chain locus to generate a small (1-2%) population of class switch-competent insulin-binding B cells. Tracking of this rare population in a polyclonal repertoire reveals that anti-insulin B cells are preferentially skewed into marginal zone and late transitional subsets known to have increased sensitivity to proinflammatory signals. Additionally, IL-10 production, characteristic of regulatory B cell subsets, is increased. In contrast to conventional models, class switch-competent anti-insulin B cells proliferate normally in response to mitogenic stimuli but remain functionally silent for insulin autoantibody production. Diabetes development is accelerated, which demonstrates the power of anti-insulin B cells to exacerbate disease without differentiation into Ab-forming or plasma cells. Autoreactive T cell responses in V125NOD mice are not restricted to insulin autoantigens, as evidenced by increased IFN-γ production to a broad array of diabetes-associated epitopes. Together, these results independently validate the pathogenic role of anti-insulin B cells in type 1 diabetes, underscore their diverse developmental fates, and demonstrate the pathologic potential of coupling a critical β cell specificity to predominantly proinflammatory Ag-presenting B cell subsets.
Copyright © 2018 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.
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17 MeSH Terms
Store depletion-induced h-channel plasticity rescues a channelopathy linked to Alzheimer's disease.
Musial TF, Molina-Campos E, Bean LA, Ybarra N, Borenstein R, Russo ML, Buss EW, Justus D, Neuman KM, Ayala GD, Mullen SA, Voskobiynyk Y, Tulisiak CT, Fels JA, Corbett NJ, Carballo G, Kennedy CD, Popovic J, Ramos-Franco J, Fill M, Pergande MR, Borgia JA, Corbett GT, Pahan K, Han Y, Chetkovich DM, Vassar RJ, Byrne RW, Matthew Oh M, Stoub TR, Remy S, Disterhoft JF, Nicholson DA
(2018) Neurobiol Learn Mem 154: 141-157
MeSH Terms: Action Potentials, Aging, Alzheimer Disease, Animals, CA1 Region, Hippocampal, Channelopathies, Disease Models, Animal, Endoplasmic Reticulum, Female, Hyperpolarization-Activated Cyclic Nucleotide-Gated Channels, Male, Mice, Transgenic, Neuronal Plasticity, Pyramidal Cells
Show Abstract · Added April 2, 2019
Voltage-gated ion channels are critical for neuronal integration. Some of these channels, however, are misregulated in several neurological disorders, causing both gain- and loss-of-function channelopathies in neurons. Using several transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease (AD), we find that sub-threshold voltage signals strongly influenced by hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels progressively deteriorate over chronological aging in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. The degraded signaling via HCN channels in the transgenic mice is accompanied by an age-related global loss of their non-uniform dendritic expression. Both the aberrant signaling via HCN channels and their mislocalization could be restored using a variety of pharmacological agents that target the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Our rescue of the HCN channelopathy helps provide molecular details into the favorable outcomes of ER-targeting drugs on the pathogenesis and synaptic/cognitive deficits in AD mouse models, and implies that they might have beneficial effects on neurological disorders linked to HCN channelopathies.
Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.
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14 MeSH Terms
Adrenal serotonin derives from accumulation by the antidepressant-sensitive serotonin transporter.
Brindley RL, Bauer MB, Walker LA, Quinlan MA, Carneiro AMD, Sze JY, Blakely RD, Currie KPM
(2019) Pharmacol Res 140: 56-66
MeSH Terms: Adrenal Glands, Animals, Antidepressive Agents, Female, Male, Mesencephalon, Mice, Transgenic, Models, Animal, Rhombencephalon, Serotonin, Serotonin Plasma Membrane Transport Proteins, Spinal Cord, Tyrosine 3-Monooxygenase
Show Abstract · Added August 8, 2018
Adrenal chromaffin cells comprise the neuroendocrine arm of the sympathetic nervous system and secrete catecholamines to coordinate the appropriate stress response. Deletion of the serotonin (5-HT) transporter (SERT) gene in mice (SERT mice) or pharmacological block of SERT function in rodents and humans augments this sympathoadrenal stress response (epinephrine secretion). The prevailing assumption is that loss of CNS SERT alters central drive to the peripheral sympathetic nervous system. Adrenal chromaffin cells also prominently express SERT where it might coordinate accumulation of 5-HT for reuse in the autocrine control of stress-evoked catecholamine secretion. To help test this hypothesis, we have generated a novel mouse model with selective excision of SERT in the peripheral sympathetic nervous system (SERT), generated by crossing floxed SERT mice with tyrosine hydroxylase Cre driver mice. SERT expression, assessed by western blot, was abolished in the adrenal gland but not perturbed in the CNS of SERT mice. SERT-mediated [H] 5-HT uptake was unaltered in midbrain, hindbrain, and spinal cord synaptosomes, confirming transporter function was intact in the CNS. Endogenous midbrain and whole blood 5-HT homeostasis was unperturbed in SERT mice, contrasting with the depleted 5-HT content in SERT mice. Selective SERT excision reduced adrenal gland 5-HT content by ≈ 50% in SERT mice but had no effect on adrenal catecholamine content. This novel model confirms that SERT expressed in adrenal chromaffin cells is essential for maintaining wild-type levels of 5-HT and provides a powerful tool to help dissect the role of SERT in the sympathetic stress response.
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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13 MeSH Terms
Oxidative stress increases M1dG, a major peroxidation-derived DNA adduct, in mitochondrial DNA.
Wauchope OR, Mitchener MM, Beavers WN, Galligan JJ, Camarillo JM, Sanders WD, Kingsley PJ, Shim HN, Blackwell T, Luong T, deCaestecker M, Fessel JP, Marnett LJ
(2018) Nucleic Acids Res 46: 3458-3467
MeSH Terms: Animals, Bone Morphogenetic Protein Receptors, Type II, DNA Adducts, DNA, Mitochondrial, Electron Transport, Endothelial Cells, Gene Expression Regulation, Humans, Hypertension, Pulmonary, Lipid Peroxidation, Mice, Mice, Transgenic, Mitochondria, Mutagenesis, Oxidants, Oxidative Stress, Purine Nucleosides, Reactive Oxygen Species, Superoxides
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are formed in mitochondria during electron transport and energy generation. Elevated levels of ROS lead to increased amounts of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage. We report that levels of M1dG, a major endogenous peroxidation-derived DNA adduct, are 50-100-fold higher in mtDNA than in nuclear DNA in several different human cell lines. Treatment of cells with agents that either increase or decrease mitochondrial superoxide levels leads to increased or decreased levels of M1dG in mtDNA, respectively. Sequence analysis of adducted mtDNA suggests that M1dG residues are randomly distributed throughout the mitochondrial genome. Basal levels of M1dG in mtDNA from pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMVECs) from transgenic bone morphogenetic protein receptor 2 mutant mice (BMPR2R899X) (four adducts per 106 dG) are twice as high as adduct levels in wild-type cells. A similar increase was observed in mtDNA from heterozygous null (BMPR2+/-) compared to wild-type PMVECs. Pulmonary arterial hypertension is observed in the presence of BMPR2 signaling disruptions, which are also associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidant injury to endothelial tissue. Persistence of M1dG adducts in mtDNA could have implications for mutagenesis and mitochondrial gene expression, thereby contributing to the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in diseases.
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19 MeSH Terms
TRAF6 Mediates Basal Activation of NF-κB Necessary for Hematopoietic Stem Cell Homeostasis.
Fang J, Muto T, Kleppe M, Bolanos LC, Hueneman KM, Walker CS, Sampson L, Wellendorf AM, Chetal K, Choi K, Salomonis N, Choi Y, Zheng Y, Cancelas JA, Levine RL, Starczynowski DT
(2018) Cell Rep 22: 1250-1262
MeSH Terms: Animals, Enzyme Activation, Hematopoiesis, Hematopoietic Stem Cells, Homeostasis, I-kappa B Kinase, Mice, Mice, Transgenic, NF-kappa B, Signal Transduction, TNF Receptor-Associated Factor 6
Show Abstract · Added February 26, 2018
Basal nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) activation is required for hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) homeostasis in the absence of inflammation; however, the upstream mediators of basal NF-κB signaling are less well understood. Here, we describe TRAF6 as an essential regulator of HSC homeostasis through basal activation of NF-κB. Hematopoietic-specific deletion of Traf6 resulted in impaired HSC self-renewal and fitness. Gene expression, RNA splicing, and molecular analyses of Traf6-deficient hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) revealed changes in adaptive immune signaling, innate immune signaling, and NF-κB signaling, indicating that signaling via TRAF6 in the absence of cytokine stimulation and/or infection is required for HSC function. In addition, we established that loss of IκB kinase beta (IKKβ)-mediated NF-κB activation is responsible for the major hematopoietic defects observed in Traf6-deficient HSPC as deletion of IKKβ similarly resulted in impaired HSC self-renewal and fitness. Taken together, TRAF6 is required for HSC homeostasis by maintaining a minimal threshold level of IKKβ/NF-κB signaling.
Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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11 MeSH Terms
Sulfenylation of Human Liver and Kidney Microsomal Cytochromes P450 and Other Drug-Metabolizing Enzymes as a Response to Redox Alteration.
Albertolle ME, Phan TTN, Pozzi A, Guengerich FP
(2018) Mol Cell Proteomics 17: 889-900
MeSH Terms: Animals, Biocatalysis, Cysteine, Cytochrome P-450 Enzyme System, Humans, Hydrogen Peroxide, Kidney, Mice, Transgenic, Microsomes, Liver, Oxidation-Reduction, Pharmaceutical Preparations, Recombinant Proteins, Staining and Labeling, Sulfenic Acids, Sulfhydryl Compounds
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
The lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) provides an oxidizing environment to aid in the formation of disulfide bonds, which is tightly regulated by both antioxidant proteins and small molecules. On the cytoplasmic side of the ER, cytochrome P450 (P450) proteins have been identified as a superfamily of enzymes that are important in the formation of endogenous chemicals as well as in the detoxication of xenobiotics. Our previous report described oxidative inhibition of P450 Family 4 enzymes via oxidation of the heme-thiolate cysteine to a sulfenic acid (-SOH) (Albertolle, M. E. (2017) 292, 11230-11242). Further proteomic analyses of murine kidney and liver microsomes led to the finding that a number of other drug-metabolizing enzymes located in the ER are also redox-regulated in this manner. We expanded our analysis of sulfenylated enzymes to human liver and kidney microsomes. Evaluation of the sulfenylation, catalytic activity, and spectral properties of P450s 1A2, 2C8, 2D6, and 3A4 led to the identification of two classes of redox sensitivity in P450 enzymes: heme-thiolate-sensitive and thiol-insensitive. These findings provide evidence for a mammalian P450 regulatory mechanism, which may also be relevant to other drug-metabolizing enzymes. (Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD007913.).
© 2018 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.
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15 MeSH Terms
Cooperative function of Pdx1 and Oc1 in multipotent pancreatic progenitors impacts postnatal islet maturation and adaptability.
Kropp PA, Dunn JC, Carboneau BA, Stoffers DA, Gannon M
(2018) Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 314: E308-E321
MeSH Terms: Adaptation, Physiological, Animals, Animals, Newborn, Cell Differentiation, Cells, Cultured, Diet, High-Fat, Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental, Glucose, Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 6, Homeodomain Proteins, Insulin-Secreting Cells, Islets of Langerhans, Male, Mice, Mice, Transgenic, Multipotent Stem Cells, Organogenesis, Trans-Activators
Show Abstract · Added April 15, 2019
The transcription factors pancreatic and duodenal homeobox 1 (Pdx1) and onecut1 (Oc1) are coexpressed in multipotent pancreatic progenitors (MPCs), but their expression patterns diverge in hormone-expressing cells, with Oc1 expression being extinguished in the endocrine lineage and Pdx1 being maintained at high levels in β-cells. We previously demonstrated that cooperative function of these two factors in MPCs is necessary for proper specification and differentiation of pancreatic endocrine cells. In those studies, we observed a persistent decrease in expression of the β-cell maturity factor MafA. We therefore hypothesized that Pdx1 and Oc1 cooperativity in MPCs impacts postnatal β-cell maturation and function. Here our model of Pdx1-Oc1 double heterozygosity was used to investigate the impact of haploinsufficiency for both of these factors on postnatal β-cell maturation, function, and adaptability. Examining mice at postnatal day (P) 14, we observed alterations in pancreatic insulin content in both Pdx1 heterozygotes and double heterozygotes. Gene expression analysis at this age revealed significantly decreased expression of many genes important for glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (e.g., Glut2, Pcsk1/2, Abcc8) exclusively in double heterozygotes. Analysis of P14 islets revealed an increase in the number of mixed islets in double heterozygotes. We predicted that double-heterozygous β-cells would have an impaired ability to respond to stress. Indeed, we observed that β-cell proliferation fails to increase in double heterozygotes in response to either high-fat diet or placental lactogen. We thus report here the importance of cooperation between regulatory factors early in development for postnatal islet maturation and adaptability.
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Glucagon-like peptide 1 signaling inhibits allergen-induced lung IL-33 release and reduces group 2 innate lymphoid cell cytokine production in vivo.
Toki S, Goleniewska K, Reiss S, Zhang J, Bloodworth MH, Stier MT, Zhou W, Newcomb DC, Ware LB, Stanwood GD, Galli A, Boyd KL, Niswender KD, Peebles RS
(2018) J Allergy Clin Immunol 142: 1515-1528.e8
MeSH Terms: Allergens, Alternaria, Animals, Asthma, Cytokines, Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, Eosinophilia, Female, Glucagon-Like Peptide 1, Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor, Immunity, Innate, Interleukin-33, Lung, Lymphocytes, Mice, Inbred BALB C, Mice, Transgenic, Mucus, Signal Transduction
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2018
BACKGROUND - IL-33 is one of the most consistently associated gene candidates for asthma identified by using a genome-wide association study. Studies in mice and in human cells have confirmed the importance of IL-33 in inducing type 2 cytokine production from both group 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s) and T2 cells. However, there are no pharmacologic agents known to inhibit IL-33 release from airway cells.
OBJECTIVE - We sought to determine the effect of glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor (GLP-1R) signaling on aeroallergen-induced airway IL-33 production and release and on innate type 2 airway inflammation.
METHODS - BALB/c mice were challenged intranasally with Alternaria extract for 4 consecutive days. GLP-1R agonist or vehicle was administered starting either 2 days before the first Alternaria extract challenge or 1 day after the first Alternaria extract challenge.
RESULTS - GLP-1R agonist treatment starting 2 days before the first Alternaria extract challenge decreased IL-33 release in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and dual oxidase 1 (Duox1) mRNA expression 1 hour after the first Alternaria extract challenge and IL-33 expression in lung epithelial cells 24 hours after the last Alternaria extract challenge. Furthermore, GLP-1R agonist significantly decreased the number of ILC2s expressing IL-5 and IL-13, lung protein expression of type 2 cytokines and chemokines, the number of perivascular eosinophils, mucus production, and airway responsiveness compared with vehicle treatment. GLP-1R agonist treatment starting 1 day after the first Alternaria extract challenge also significantly decreased eosinophilia and type 2 cytokine and chemokine expression in the airway after 4 days of Alternaria extract challenge.
CONCLUSION - These results reveal that GLP-1R signaling might be a therapy to reduce IL-33 release and inhibit the ILC2 response to protease-containing aeroallergens, such as Alternaria.
Copyright © 2018 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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18 MeSH Terms