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Medicaid and marketplace eligibility changes will occur often in all states; policy options can ease impact.
Sommers BD, Graves JA, Swartz K, Rosenbaum S
(2014) Health Aff (Millwood) 33: 700-7
MeSH Terms: Adult, Eligibility Determination, Health Insurance Exchanges, Health Policy, Humans, Income, Insurance Coverage, Medicaid, Middle Aged, Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, State Government, United States, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added February 19, 2015
Under the Affordable Care Act (ACA), changes in income and family circumstances are likely to produce frequent transitions in eligibility for Medicaid and health insurance Marketplace coverage for low- and middle-income adults. We provide state-by-state estimates of potential eligibility changes ("churning") if all states expanded Medicaid under health reform, and we identify predictors of rates of churning within states. Combining longitudinal survey data with state-specific weighting and small-area estimation techniques, we found that eligibility changes occurred frequently in all fifty states. Higher-income states and states that had more generous Medicaid eligibility criteria for nonelderly adults before the ACA experienced more churning, although the differences were small. Even in states with the least churning, we estimated that more than 40 percent of adults likely to enroll in Medicaid or subsidized Marketplace coverage would experience a change in eligibility within twelve months. Policy options for states to reduce the frequency and impact of coverage changes include adopting twelve-month continuous eligibility for adults in Medicaid, creating a Basic Health Program, using Medicaid funds to subsidize Marketplace coverage for low-income adults, and encouraging the same health insurers to offer plans in Medicaid and the Marketplaces.
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13 MeSH Terms
The possible impact of the US prospective payment system ("bundle") on the growth of peritoneal dialysis.
Golper TA
(2013) Perit Dial Int 33: 596-9
MeSH Terms: Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, U.S., Home Care Services, Humans, Peritoneal Dialysis, Prospective Payment System, Renal Dialysis, United States
Added March 19, 2014
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7 MeSH Terms
The effect of regulatory advisories on maternal antidepressant prescribing, 1995-2007: an interrupted time series study of 228,876 pregnancies.
Bobo WV, Epstein RA, Hayes RM, Shelton RC, Hartert TV, Mitchel E, Horner J, Wu P
(2014) Arch Womens Ment Health 17: 17-26
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Antidepressive Agents, Depression, Drug Labeling, Drug Prescriptions, Female, Humans, Longitudinal Studies, Medicaid, Mothers, Practice Patterns, Physicians', Pregnancy, Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors, Tennessee, Time Factors, United States, United States Food and Drug Administration, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added May 27, 2014
The purpose of this study was to assess whether antidepressant prescribing during pregnancy decreased following release of U.S. and Canadian public health advisory warnings about the risk of perinatal complications with antidepressants. We analyzed data from 228,876 singleton pregnancies among women (aged 15-44 years) continuously enrolled in Tennessee Medicaid with full pharmacy benefits (1995-2007). Antidepressant prescribing was determined through outpatient pharmacy dispensing files. Information on sociodemographic and clinical factors was obtained from enrollment files and linked birth certificates. An interrupted time series design with segmented regression analysis was used to quantify the impact of the advisory warnings (2002-2005). Antidepressant prescribing rates increased steadily from 1995 to 2001, followed by sharper increases from 2002 to late 2004. Overall antidepressant prescribing prevalence was 34.51 prescriptions [95 % confidence interval (CI) 33.37-35.65] per 1,000 women in January 2002, and increased at a rate of 0.46 (95 % CI 0.41-0.52) prescriptions per 1,000 women per month until the end of the pre-warning period (May 2004). During the post-warning period (October 2004-June 2005), antidepressant prescribing decreased by 1.48 (95 % CI 1.62-1.35) prescriptions per 1,000 women per month. These trends were observed for both selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) and non-SSRI antidepressants, although SSRI prescribing decreased at a greater rate. We conclude that antidepressant prescribing to pregnant women in Tennessee Medicaid increased from 1995 to late 2004. U.S. and Canadian public health advisories about antidepressant-associated perinatal complications were associated with steady decreases in antidepressant prescribing from late 2004 until the end of the study period, suggesting that the advisory warnings were impactful on antidepressant prescribing in pregnancy.
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19 MeSH Terms
Spatiotemporal patterns of infant bronchiolitis in a Tennessee Medicaid population.
Sloan CD, Gebretsadik T, Wu P, Carroll KN, Mitchel EF, Hartert TV
(2013) Spat Spatiotemporal Epidemiol 6: 17-23
MeSH Terms: Bronchiolitis, Cluster Analysis, Cohort Studies, Epidemics, Female, Geographic Mapping, Hospitalization, Humans, Infant, Infant, Newborn, Male, Medicaid, Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections, Retrospective Studies, Seasons, Spatial Analysis, Tennessee, United States
Show Abstract · Added May 27, 2014
Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of worldwide morbidity and mortality in infants, primarily through the induction of bronchiolitis. RSV epidemics are highly seasonal, occurring in the winter months in the northern hemisphere. Within the United States, RSV epidemic dynamics vary both spatially and temporally. This analysis employs a retrospective space–time scan statistic to locate spatiotemporal clustering of infant bronchiolitis in a very large Tennessee (TN) Medicaid cohort. We studied infants less than 6 months of age (N = 52,468 infants) who had an outpatient visit, emergency department visit, or hospitalization for bronchiolitis between 1995 and 2008. The scan statistic revealed distinctive and consistent patterns of deviation in epidemic timing. Eastern TN (Knoxville area) showed clustering in January and February, and Central TN (Nashville area) in November and December. This is likely due to local variation in geography-associated factors which should be taken into consideration in future modeling of RSV epidemics.
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18 MeSH Terms
Reactive versus proactive patterns of inhaled corticosteroid use.
Sloan CD, Gebretsadik T, Wu P, Mitchel EF, Hartert TV
(2013) Ann Am Thorac Soc 10: 131-4
MeSH Terms: Administration, Inhalation, Asthma, Child, Dose-Response Relationship, Drug, Drug Administration Schedule, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Glucocorticoids, Humans, Male, Medicaid, Morbidity, Patient Compliance, Prescription Drugs, Retrospective Studies, Time Factors, Treatment Outcome, United States
Show Abstract · Added May 27, 2014
For patients with persistent asthma, inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) are a mainstay of controller therapy. These medications are usually prescribed to be taken daily and have been shown to be associated with decreased asthma morbidity. Adherence to daily treatment is very low in many populations in the United States. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the seasonal use of ICS prescription filling as reactive behavior primarily after an asthma exacerbation in a pediatric population. The study population is a subgroup of the Tennessee Asthma and Bronchiolitis Study. The children in this study were enrolled in Tennessee Medicaid (TennCare). The subjects had asthma and were 6 to 9 years of age during the years 2005 to 2010. Prescription filling was determined using claims data, and asthma exacerbations were defined by use of systemic rescue corticosteroids (RCS). In this cohort of 13,114 children with asthma, ICS and RCS filling were highly seasonal and trended with fall and winter peaks in asthma exacerbations. Prescription refilling was very low, with an average of three ICS fills per child who filled at least one during the study period. Among these children, 54.1% (7,096) had an asthma exacerbation during the study period. Among ICS users, 68.5% (3,441/5,020) had a disease exacerbation. ICS filling occurred overwhelmingly on the same day as RCS fills. The seasonal filling patterns of ICS coincide with asthma exacerbations. ICS adherence is low and inconsistent in this population of children with asthma. Increased adherence to ICS, particularly before the seasonal virus epidemics, could greatly reduce asthma morbidity.
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18 MeSH Terms
Identifying suicidal behavior among adolescents using administrative claims data.
Callahan ST, Fuchs DC, Shelton RC, Balmer LS, Dudley JA, Gideon PS, Deranieri MM, Stratton SM, Williams CL, Ray WA, Cooper WO
(2013) Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf 22: 769-75
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adolescent Behavior, Age Factors, Algorithms, Antidepressive Agents, Child, Data Mining, Databases, Factual, Drug Prescriptions, Drug Utilization Review, Female, Hospitalization, Humans, Length of Stay, Male, Medicaid, Pharmacoepidemiology, Pharmacovigilance, Retrospective Studies, Risk Factors, Suicidal Ideation, Suicide, Attempted, Time Factors, United States
Show Abstract · Added March 7, 2014
PURPOSE - To assess the safety of psychotropic medication use in children and adolescents, it is critical to be able to identify suicidal behaviors from medical claims data and distinguish them from other injuries. The purpose of this study was to develop an algorithm using administrative claims data to identify medically treated suicidal behavior in a cohort of children and adolescents.
METHODS - The cohort included 80,183 youth (6-18 years) enrolled in Tennessee's Medicaid program from 1995-2006 who were prescribed antidepressants. Potential episodes of suicidal behavior were identified using external cause-of-injury codes (E-codes) and ICD-9-CM codes corresponding to the potential mechanisms of or injuries resulting from suicidal behavior. For each identified episode, medical records were reviewed to determine if the injury was self-inflicted and if intent to die was explicitly stated or could be inferred.
RESULTS - Medical records were reviewed for 2676 episodes of potential self-harm identified through claims data. Among 1162 episodes that were classified as suicidal behavior, 1117 (96%) had a claim for suicide and self-inflicted injury, poisoning by drugs, or both. The positive predictive value of code groups to predict suicidal behavior ranged from 0-88% and improved when there was a concomitant hospitalization but with the limitation of excluding some episodes of confirmed suicidal behavior.
CONCLUSIONS - Nearly all episodes of confirmed suicidal behavior in this cohort of youth included an ICD-9-CM code for suicide or poisoning by drugs. An algorithm combining these ICD-9-CM codes and hospital stay greatly improved the positive predictive value for identifying medically treated suicidal behavior.
Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
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24 MeSH Terms
Medicaid expansion opt-outs and uncompensated care.
Graves JA
(2012) N Engl J Med 367: 2365-7
MeSH Terms: Economics, Hospital, Financing, Government, Medicaid, Medically Uninsured, Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, Reimbursement, Disproportionate Share, State Government, State Health Plans, Supreme Court Decisions, Uncompensated Care, United States
Added March 7, 2014
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11 MeSH Terms
Positive predictive value of a case definition for diabetes mellitus using automated administrative health data in children and youth exposed to antipsychotic drugs or control medications: a Tennessee Medicaid study.
Bobo WV, Cooper WO, Stein CM, Olfson M, Mounsey J, Daugherty J, Ray WA
(2012) BMC Med Res Methodol 12: 128
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Antipsychotic Agents, Child, Databases as Topic, Diabetes Mellitus, Electronic Prescribing, Female, Humans, Hypoglycemic Agents, Male, Medicaid, Reproducibility of Results, Tennessee, United States, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added March 7, 2014
BACKGROUND - We developed and validated an automated database case definition for diabetes in children and youth to facilitate pharmacoepidemiologic investigations of medications and the risk of diabetes.
METHODS - The present study was part of an in-progress retrospective cohort study of antipsychotics and diabetes in Tennessee Medicaid enrollees aged 6-24 years. Diabetes was identified from diabetes-related medical care encounters: hospitalizations, outpatient visits, and filled prescriptions. The definition required either a primary inpatient diagnosis or at least two other encounters of different types, most commonly an outpatient diagnosis with a prescription. Type 1 diabetes was defined by insulin prescriptions with at most one oral hypoglycemic prescription; other cases were considered type 2 diabetes. The definition was validated for cohort members in the 15 county region geographically proximate to the investigators. Medical records were reviewed and adjudicated for cases that met the automated database definition as well as for a sample of persons with other diabetes-related medical care encounters.
RESULTS - The study included 64 cases that met the automated database definition. Records were adjudicated for 46 (71.9%), of which 41 (89.1%) met clinical criteria for newly diagnosed diabetes. The positive predictive value for type 1 diabetes was 80.0%. For type 2 and unspecified diabetes combined, the positive predictive value was 83.9%. The estimated sensitivity of the definition, based on adjudication for a sample of 30 cases not meeting the automated database definition, was 64.8%.
CONCLUSION - These results suggest that the automated database case definition for diabetes may be useful for pharmacoepidemiologic studies of medications and diabetes.
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15 MeSH Terms
Burden of gastrointestinal disease in the United States: 2012 update.
Peery AF, Dellon ES, Lund J, Crockett SD, McGowan CE, Bulsiewicz WJ, Gangarosa LM, Thiny MT, Stizenberg K, Morgan DR, Ringel Y, Kim HP, DiBonaventura MD, Carroll CF, Allen JK, Cook SF, Sandler RS, Kappelman MD, Shaheen NJ
(2012) Gastroenterology 143: 1179-1187.e3
MeSH Terms: Endoscopy, Digestive System, Gastrointestinal Diseases, Gastrointestinal Neoplasms, Health Care Surveys, Health Surveys, Hospitalization, Humans, Incidence, Medicaid, Medicare, Quality of Life, SEER Program, Survival Rate, United States, Vital Statistics
Show Abstract · Added May 18, 2016
BACKGROUND & AIMS - Gastrointestinal (GI) diseases account for substantial morbidity, mortality, and cost. Statistical analyses of the most recent data are necessary to guide GI research, education, and clinical practice. We estimate the burden of GI disease in the United States.
METHODS - We collected information on the epidemiology of GI diseases (including cancers) and symptoms, along with data on resource utilization, quality of life, impairments to work and activity, morbidity, and mortality. These data were obtained from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey; National Health and Wellness Survey; Nationwide Inpatient Sample; Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program; National Vital Statistics System; Thompson Reuters MarketScan; Medicare; Medicaid; and the Clinical Outcomes Research Initiative's National Endoscopic Database. We estimated endoscopic use and costs and examined trends in endoscopic procedure.
RESULTS - Abdominal pain was the most common GI symptom that prompted a clinic visit (15.9 million visits). Gastroesophageal reflux was the most common GI diagnosis (8.9 million visits). Hospitalizations and mortality from Clostridium difficile infection have doubled in the last 10 years. Acute pancreatitis was the most common reason for hospitalization (274,119 discharges). Colorectal cancer accounted for more than half of all GI cancers and was the leading cause of GI-related mortality (52,394 deaths). There were 6.9 million upper, 11.5 million lower, and 228,000 biliary endoscopies performed in 2009. The total cost for outpatient GI endoscopy examinations was $32.4 billion.
CONCLUSIONS - GI diseases are a source of substantial morbidity, mortality, and cost in the United States.
Copyright © 2012 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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15 MeSH Terms
The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act: the impact on urologic cancer care.
Keegan KA, Penson DF
(2013) Urol Oncol 31: 980-4
MeSH Terms: Accountable Care Organizations, Health Care Costs, Health Services Accessibility, Humans, Medicaid, Outcome Assessment, Health Care, Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, United States, Urologic Neoplasms
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
In March 2010, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act as well as its amendments were signed into law. This sweeping legislation was aimed at controlling spiraling healthcare costs and redressing significant disparities in healthcare access and quality. Cancer diagnoses and their treatments constitute a large component of rising healthcare expenditures and, not surprisingly, the legislation will have a significant influence on cancer care in the USA. Because genitourinary malignancies represent an impressive 25% of all cancer diagnoses per year, this legislation could have a profound impact on urologic oncology. To this end, we will present key components of this landmark legislation, including the proposed expansion to Medicaid coverage, the projected role of Accountable Care Organizations, the expected creation of quality reporting systems, the formation of an independent Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute, and enhanced regulation on physician-owned practices. We will specifically address the anticipated effect of these changes on urologic cancer care. Briefly, the legal ramifications and current barriers to the statutes will be examined.
Published by Elsevier Inc.
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9 MeSH Terms