Other search tools

About this data

The publication data currently available has been vetted by Vanderbilt faculty, staff, administrators and trainees. The data itself is retrieved directly from NCBI's PubMed and is automatically updated on a weekly basis to ensure accuracy and completeness.

If you have any questions or comments, please contact us.

Results: 11 to 20 of 97

Publication Record

Connections

Exploring how symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder are related to reading and mathematics performance: general genes, general environments.
Hart SA, Petrill SA, Willcutt E, Thompson LA, Schatschneider C, Deater-Deckard K, Cutting LE
(2010) Psychol Sci 21: 1708-15
MeSH Terms: Achievement, Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity, Child, Diseases in Twins, Female, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Humans, Learning Disorders, Longitudinal Studies, Male, Mathematics, Models, Genetic, Models, Psychological, Phenotype, Reading, Social Environment
Show Abstract · Added May 27, 2014
Children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) tend to perform more poorly on tests of reading and mathematical performance than their typical peers. Quantitative genetic analyses allow for a better understanding of the etiology of ADHD and reading and mathematics outcomes, by examining their common and unique genetic and environmental influences. Analyses were conducted on a sample 271 pairs of 10-year-old monozygotic and dizygotic twins drawn from the Western Reserve Reading and Mathematics Project. In general, the results suggested that the associations among ADHD symptoms, reading outcomes, and math outcomes were influenced by both general genetic and general shared-environment factors. The analyses also suggested significant independent genetic effects for ADHD symptoms. The results imply that differing etiological factors underlie the relationships among ADHD and reading and mathematics performance. It appears that both genetic and common family or school environments link ADHD with academic performance.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
16 MeSH Terms
Characterization of tissue structure at varying length scales using temporal diffusion spectroscopy.
Gore JC, Xu J, Colvin DC, Yankeelov TE, Parsons EC, Does MD
(2010) NMR Biomed 23: 745-56
MeSH Terms: Animals, Brain, Cells, Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, Mathematics, Models, Theoretical, Neoplasms
Show Abstract · Added November 13, 2013
The concepts, theoretical behavior and experimental applications of temporal diffusion spectroscopy are reviewed and illustrated. Temporal diffusion spectra are obtained using oscillating-gradient waveforms in diffusion-weighted measurements, and represent the manner in which various spectral components of molecular velocity correlations vary in different geometrical structures that restrict or hinder free movements. Measurements made at different gradient frequencies reveal information on the scale of restrictions or hindrances to free diffusion, and the shape of a spectrum reveals the relative contributions of spatial restrictions at different distance scales. Such spectra differ from other so-called diffusion spectra which depict spatial frequencies and are defined at a fixed diffusion time. Experimentally, oscillating gradients at moderate frequency are more feasible for exploring restrictions at very short distances which, in tissues, correspond to structures smaller than cells. We describe the underlying concepts of temporal diffusion spectra and provide analytical expressions for the behavior of the diffusion coefficient as a function of gradient frequency in simple geometries with different dimensions. Diffusion in more complex model media that mimic tissues has been simulated using numerical methods. Experimental measurements of diffusion spectra have been obtained in suspensions of particles and cells, as well as in vivo in intact animals. An observation of particular interest is the increased contrast and heterogeneity observed in tumors using oscillating gradients at moderate frequency compared with conventional pulse gradient methods, and the potential for detecting changes in tumors early in their response to treatment. Computer simulations suggest that diffusion spectral measurements may be sensitive to intracellular structures, such as nuclear size, and that changes in tissue diffusion properties may be measured before there are changes in cell density.
Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
0 Communities
4 Members
0 Resources
8 MeSH Terms
Addressing literacy and numeracy to improve diabetes care: two randomized controlled trials.
Cavanaugh K, Wallston KA, Gebretsadik T, Shintani A, Huizinga MM, Davis D, Gregory RP, Malone R, Pignone M, DeWalt D, Elasy TA, Rothman RL
(2009) Diabetes Care 32: 2149-55
MeSH Terms: Activities of Daily Living, Adult, Blood Glucose, Blood Glucose Self-Monitoring, Diabetes Mellitus, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Educational Status, Female, Glycated Hemoglobin A, Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice, Humans, Hypoglycemic Agents, Income, Insulin, Insurance, Health, Knowledge, Male, Mathematics, Middle Aged, Patient Education as Topic, Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
OBJECTIVE - Diabetic patients with lower literacy or numeracy skills are at greater risk for poor diabetes outcomes. This study evaluated the impact of providing literacy- and numeracy-sensitive diabetes care within an enhanced diabetes care program on A1C and other diabetes outcomes.
RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - In two randomized controlled trials, we enrolled 198 adult diabetic patients with most recent A1C >or=7.0%, referred for participation in an enhanced diabetes care program. For 3 months, control patients received care from existing enhanced diabetes care programs, whereas intervention patients received enhanced programs that also addressed literacy and numeracy at each institution. Intervention providers received health communication training and used the interactive Diabetes Literacy and Numeracy Education Toolkit with patients. A1C was measured at 3 and 6 months follow-up. Secondary outcomes included self-efficacy, self-management behaviors, and treatment satisfaction.
RESULTS - At 3 months, both intervention and control patients had significant improvements in A1C from baseline (intervention -1.50 [95% CI -1.80 to -1.02]; control -0.80 [-1.10 to -0.30]). In adjusted analysis, there was greater improvement in A1C in the intervention group than in the control group (P = 0.03). At 6 months, there were no differences in A1C between intervention and control groups. Self-efficacy improved from baseline for both groups. No significant differences were found for self-management behaviors or satisfaction.
CONCLUSIONS - A literacy- and numeracy-focused diabetes care program modestly improved self-efficacy and glycemic control compared with standard enhanced diabetes care, but the difference attenuated after conclusion of the intervention.
0 Communities
3 Members
0 Resources
21 MeSH Terms
Work preferences, life values, and personal views of top math/science graduate students and the profoundly gifted: Developmental changes and gender differences during emerging adulthood and parenthood.
Ferriman K, Lubinski D, Benbow CP
(2009) J Pers Soc Psychol 97: 517-32
MeSH Terms: Achievement, Adolescent, Adult, Career Choice, Career Mobility, Child, Gifted, Choice Behavior, Culture, Education, Graduate, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Gender Identity, Humans, Life Style, Male, Mathematics, Parents, School Admission Criteria, Science, Social Values, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2018
Work preferences, life values, and personal views of top math/science graduate students (275 men, 255 women) were assessed at ages 25 and 35 years. In Study 1, analyses of work preferences revealed developmental changes and gender differences in priorities: Some gender differences increased over time and increased more among parents than among childless participants, seemingly because the mothers' priorities changed. In Study 2, gender differences in the graduate students' life values and personal views at age 35 were compared with those of profoundly gifted participants (top 1 in 10,000, identified by age 13 and tracked for 20 years: 265 men, 84 women). Again, gender differences were larger among parents. Across both cohorts, men appeared to assume a more agentic, career-focused perspective than women did, placing more importance on creating high-impact products, receiving compensation, taking risks, and gaining recognition as the best in their fields. Women appeared to favor a more communal, holistic perspective, emphasizing community, family, friendships, and less time devoted to career. Gender differences in life priorities, which intensify during parenthood, anticipated differential male-female representation in high-level and time-intensive careers, even among talented men and women with similar profiles of abilities, vocational interests, and educational experiences.
(c) 2009 APA, all rights reserved).
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
MeSH Terms
Numeracy skills explain racial differences in HIV medication management.
Waldrop-Valverde D, Osborn CY, Rodriguez A, Rothman RL, Kumar M, Jones DL
(2010) AIDS Behav 14: 799-806
MeSH Terms: Adult, African Americans, Anti-HIV Agents, Educational Status, Female, HIV Infections, Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice, Health Literacy, Healthcare Disparities, Humans, Male, Mathematics, Medication Adherence, Middle Aged, Patient Education as Topic, Self Care, Self Efficacy, United States
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
Racial disparities in HIV/AIDS are well established and efforts to understand key factors that may explain these differences are needed. Recent evidence suggests that health literacy may contribute to disparities in health behaviors among African American HIV patients. One component of health literacy, numeracy, is emerging as an important skill for successful self management of medications. We therefore tested whether numeracy mediated the effects of race on medication management among HIV seropositive patients. Results showed that poor management of a simulated HIV medication regimen among African Americans and women was mediated by lower numeracy. Poor medication self-management may be a significant root cause for health disparities in African Americans with HIV/AIDS. Whether African American women may be at particular risk requires further study. Interventions to improve HIV medication self-management through addressing numeracy skills may help to narrow the gap in health disparities among African Americans with HIV/AIDS.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
18 MeSH Terms
The neural correlates of calculation ability in children: an fMRI study.
Davis N, Cannistraci CJ, Rogers BP, Gatenby JC, Fuchs LS, Anderson AW, Gore JC
(2009) Magn Reson Imaging 27: 1187-97
MeSH Terms: Adult, Brain, Brain Mapping, Child, Cognition, Female, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Mathematics, Middle Aged, Neural Pathways, Neurons, Neuropsychological Tests, Reaction Time
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2017
Most studies investigating mental numerical processing involve adult participants and little is known about the functioning of these systems in children. The current study used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate the neural correlates of numeracy and the influence of age on these correlates with a group of adults and a group of third graders who had average to above average mathematical ability. Participants performed simple and complex versions of exact and approximate calculation tasks while in the magnet. Like adults, children activated a network of brain regions in the frontal and parietal lobes during the calculation tasks, and they recruited additional brain regions for the more complex versions of the tasks. However, direct comparisons between adults and children revealed significant differences in level of activation across all tasks. In particular, patterns of activation in the parietal lobe were significantly different as a function of age. Findings support previous claims that the parietal lobe becomes more specialized for arithmetic tasks with age.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
15 MeSH Terms
Aberrant functional activation in school age children at-risk for mathematical disability: a functional imaging study of simple arithmetic skill.
Davis N, Cannistraci CJ, Rogers BP, Gatenby JC, Fuchs LS, Anderson AW, Gore JC
(2009) Neuropsychologia 47: 2470-9
MeSH Terms: Analysis of Variance, Brain, Brain Mapping, Child, Cognition Disorders, Female, Humans, Image Processing, Computer-Assisted, Learning Disorders, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Mathematics, Neuropsychological Tests, Oxygen
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2017
We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to explore the patterns of brain activation associated with different levels of performance in exact and approximate calculation tasks in well-defined cohorts of children with mathematical calculation difficulties (MD) and typically developing controls. Both groups of children activated the same network of brain regions; however, children in the MD group had significantly increased activation in parietal, frontal, and cingulate cortices during both calculation tasks. A majority of the differences occurred in anatomical brain regions associated with cognitive resources such as executive functioning and working memory that are known to support higher level arithmetic skill but are not specific to mathematical processing. We propose that these findings are evidence that children with MD use the same types of problem solving strategies as TD children, but their weak mathematical processing system causes them to employ a more developmentally immature and less efficient form of the strategies.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
14 MeSH Terms
A multimodal neural network recruited by expertise with musical notation.
Wong YK, Gauthier I
(2010) J Cogn Neurosci 22: 695-713
MeSH Terms: Acoustic Stimulation, Adolescent, Adult, Analysis of Variance, Auditory Perception, Brain, Brain Mapping, Cohort Studies, Female, Humans, Image Processing, Computer-Assisted, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Mathematics, Music, Neural Networks (Computer), Oxygen, Photic Stimulation, Reaction Time, Reading, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added February 23, 2016
Prior neuroimaging work on visual perceptual expertise has focused on changes in the visual system, ignoring possible effects of acquiring expert visual skills in nonvisual areas. We investigated expertise for reading musical notation, a skill likely to be associated with multimodal abilities. We compared brain activity in music-reading experts and novices during perception of musical notation, Roman letters, and mathematical symbols and found selectivity for musical notation for experts in a widespread multimodal network of areas. The activity in several of these areas was correlated with a behavioral measure of perceptual fluency with musical notation, suggesting that activity in nonvisual areas can predict individual differences in visual expertise. The visual selectivity for musical notation is distinct from that for faces, single Roman letters, and letter strings. Implications of the current findings to the study of visual perceptual expertise, music reading, and musical expertise are discussed.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
21 MeSH Terms
Anger management style moderates effects of attention strategy during acute pain induction on physiological responses to subsequent mental stress and recovery: a comparison of chronic pain patients and healthy nonpatients.
Burns JW, Quartana PJ, Bruehl S
(2009) Psychosom Med 71: 454-62
MeSH Terms: Acute Disease, Adaptation, Psychological, Adult, Anger, Attention, Chronic Disease, Cold Temperature, Female, Hemodynamics, Humans, Inhibition (Psychology), Low Back Pain, Male, Mathematics, Middle Aged, Muscle Contraction, Pain, Personality Inventory, Stress, Psychological
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
OBJECTIVES - To examine whether high trait anger-out chronic low back (CLBP) patients would show exceptionally large symptom-specific lower paraspinal (LP) responses, compared with healthy nonpatients, during pain induction, a subsequent mental stressor, and recovery when they were urged to suppress awareness of pain and suffering.
METHODS - CLBP patients (n = 93) and nonpatients (n = 105) were assigned randomly to one of four attention strategy conditions for use during pain induction: sensory-focus, distraction, suppression, or control. All participants underwent a cold pressor, and then performed mental arithmetic. They completed the anger-out (AOS) and anger-in (AIS) subscales of the Anger Expression Inventory.
RESULTS - General Linear Model procedures were used to test Attention Strategy Condition x Patient/Nonpatient Status x AOS (or AIS) x Period interactions for physiological indices. Significant interactions were found such that: a) high trait anger-out patients in the Suppression condition seemed to show the greatest LP reactivity during the mental arithmetic followed by the slowest recovery compared with other conditions; b) high trait anger-out patients and nonpatients in the Suppression condition seemed to show the slowest systolic blood pressure recoveries compared with other conditions.
CONCLUSIONS - Results extend previous work by suggesting that an anger-out style moderates effects of how attention is allocated during pain on responses to and recovery from a subsequent mental stressor. Results provide further evidence that trait anger-out and trait anger-in among CLBP patients are associated with increased LP muscle tension during and after pain and mental stress.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
19 MeSH Terms
Ability differences among people who have commensurate degrees matter for scientific creativity.
Park G, Lubinski D, Benbow CP
(2008) Psychol Sci 19: 957-61
MeSH Terms: Achievement, Adolescent, Adult, Aptitude, Career Choice, Creativity, Education, Graduate, Humans, Individuality, Longitudinal Studies, Mathematics, Patents as Topic, Publishing, Research, Science, Universities, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2018
A sample of 1,586 intellectually talented adolescents (top 1%) were assessed on the math portion of the SAT by age 13 and tracked for more than 25 years. Patents and scientific publications were used as criteria for scientific and technological accomplishment. Participants were categorized according to whether their terminal degree was a bachelor's, master's, or doctorate degree, and within these degree groupings, the proportion of participants with at least one patent or scientific publication in adulthood increased as a function of this early SAT assessment. Information about individual differences in cognitive ability (even when measured in early adolescence) can predict differential creative potential in science and technology within populations that have advanced educational degrees.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
MeSH Terms