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Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition Induces Podocalyxin to Promote Extravasation via Ezrin Signaling.
Fröse J, Chen MB, Hebron KE, Reinhardt F, Hajal C, Zijlstra A, Kamm RD, Weinberg RA
(2018) Cell Rep 24: 962-972
MeSH Terms: Animals, Breast Neoplasms, Cell Line, Tumor, Cytoskeletal Proteins, Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition, Female, Heterografts, Humans, Lung Neoplasms, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred NOD, Mice, SCID, Pancreatic Neoplasms, Sialoglycoproteins, Signal Transduction
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2019
The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) endows carcinoma cells with traits needed to complete many of the steps leading to metastasis formation, but its contributions specifically to the late step of extravasation remain understudied. We find that breast cancer cells that have undergone an EMT extravasate more efficiently from blood vessels both in vitro and in vivo. Analysis of gene expression changes associated with the EMT program led to the identification of an EMT-induced cell-surface protein, podocalyxin (PODXL), as a key mediator of extravasation in mesenchymal breast and pancreatic carcinoma cells. PODXL promotes extravasation through direct interaction of its intracellular domain with the cytoskeletal linker protein ezrin. Ezrin proceeds to establish dorsal cortical polarity, enabling the transition of cancer cells from a non-polarized, rounded cell morphology to an invasive extravasation-competent shape. Hence, the EMT program can directly enhance the efficiency of extravasation and subsequent metastasis formation through a PODXL-ezrin signaling axis.
Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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16 MeSH Terms
amplification is a mechanism of acquired resistance to EGFR inhibitors identified by transposon mutagenesis and clinical genomics.
Fan PD, Narzisi G, Jayaprakash AD, Venturini E, Robine N, Smibert P, Germer S, Yu HA, Jordan EJ, Paik PK, Janjigian YY, Chaft JE, Wang L, Jungbluth AA, Middha S, Spraggon L, Qiao H, Lovly CM, Kris MG, Riely GJ, Politi K, Varmus H, Ladanyi M
(2018) Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 115: E6030-E6038
MeSH Terms: Cell Line, Tumor, DNA Transposable Elements, Drug Resistance, Neoplasm, Enzyme Inhibitors, ErbB Receptors, Gene Amplification, Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic, Humans, Lung Neoplasms, Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-fyn, Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-yes, Proto-Oncogene Proteins pp60(c-src)
Show Abstract · Added September 10, 2020
In ∼30% of patients with -mutant lung adenocarcinomas whose disease progresses on EGFR inhibitors, the basis for acquired resistance remains unclear. We have integrated transposon mutagenesis screening in an -mutant cell line and clinical genomic sequencing in cases of acquired resistance to identify mechanisms of resistance to EGFR inhibitors. The most prominent candidate genes identified by insertions in or near the genes during the screen were , a gene whose amplification is known to mediate resistance to EGFR inhibitors, and the gene encoding the Src family kinase YES1. Cell clones with transposon insertions that activated expression of exhibited resistance to all three generations of EGFR inhibitors and sensitivity to pharmacologic and siRNA-mediated inhibition of Analysis of clinical genomic sequencing data from cases of acquired resistance to EGFR inhibitors revealed amplification of in five cases, four of which lacked any other known mechanisms of resistance. Preinhibitor samples, available for two of the five patients, lacked amplification. None of 136 postinhibitor samples had detectable amplification of other Src family kinases ( and ). amplification was also found in 2 of 17 samples from fusion-positive lung cancer patients who had progressed on ALK TKIs. Taken together, our findings identify acquired amplification of as a recurrent and targetable mechanism of resistance to EGFR inhibition in -mutant lung cancers and demonstrate the utility of transposon mutagenesis in discovering clinically relevant mechanisms of drug resistance.
Copyright © 2018 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.
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xCT (SLC7A11)-mediated metabolic reprogramming promotes non-small cell lung cancer progression.
Ji X, Qian J, Rahman SMJ, Siska PJ, Zou Y, Harris BK, Hoeksema MD, Trenary IA, Heidi C, Eisenberg R, Rathmell JC, Young JD, Massion PP
(2018) Oncogene 37: 5007-5019
MeSH Terms: 3T3 Cells, A549 Cells, Amino Acid Transport System y+, Animals, Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung, Cell Line, Cell Line, Tumor, Cell Proliferation, Cell Survival, Cystine, Cytoplasm, Disease Progression, Female, Glutamine, Humans, Lung Neoplasms, Male, Mice, Middle Aged
Show Abstract · Added March 28, 2019
Many tumors increase uptake and dependence on glucose, cystine or glutamine. These basic observations on cancer cell metabolism have opened multiple new diagnostic and therapeutic avenues in cancer research. Recent studies demonstrated that smoking could induce the expression of xCT (SLC7A11) in oral cancer cells, suggesting that overexpression of xCT may support lung tumor progression. We hypothesized that overexpression of xCT occurs in lung cancer cells to satisfy the metabolic requirements for growth and survival. Our results demonstrated that 1) xCT was highly expressed at the cytoplasmic membrane in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), 2) the expression of xCT was correlated with advanced stage and predicted a worse 5-year survival, 3) targeting xCT transport activity in xCT overexpressing NSCLC cells with sulfasalazine decreased cell proliferation and invasion in vitro and in vivo and 4) increased dependence on glutamine was observed in xCT overexpressed normal airway epithelial cells. These results suggested that xCT regulate metabolic requirements during lung cancer progression and be a potential therapeutic target in NSCLC.
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p52 expression enhances lung cancer progression.
Saxon JA, Yu H, Polosukhin VV, Stathopoulos GT, Gleaves LA, McLoed AG, Massion PP, Yull FE, Zhao Z, Blackwell TS
(2018) Sci Rep 8: 6078
MeSH Terms: Adenocarcinoma of Lung, Animals, Cell Proliferation, Disease Progression, Gene Expression, Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic, Humans, Lung, Lung Neoplasms, Mice, Transgenic, Middle Aged, NF-kappa B p52 Subunit, Prognosis, Tumor Burden
Show Abstract · Added May 29, 2018
While many studies have demonstrated that canonical NF-κB signaling is a central pathway in lung tumorigenesis, the role of non-canonical NF-κB signaling in lung cancer remains undefined. We observed frequent nuclear accumulation of the non-canonical NF-κB component p100/p52 in human lung adenocarcinoma. To investigate the impact of non-canonical NF-κB signaling on lung carcinogenesis, we employed transgenic mice with doxycycline-inducible expression of p52 in airway epithelial cells. p52 over-expression led to increased tumor number and progression after injection of the carcinogen urethane. Gene expression analysis of lungs from transgenic mice combined with in vitro studies suggested that p52 promotes proliferation of lung epithelial cells through regulation of cell cycle-associated genes. Using gene expression and patient information from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) database, we found that expression of p52-associated genes was increased in lung adenocarcinomas and correlated with reduced survival, even in early stage disease. Analysis of p52-associated gene expression in additional human lung adenocarcinoma datasets corroborated these findings. Together, these studies implicate the non-canonical NF-κB component p52 in lung carcinogenesis and suggest modulation of p52 activity and/or downstream mediators as new therapeutic targets.
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IκB Kinase α Is Required for Development and Progression of -Mutant Lung Adenocarcinoma.
Vreka M, Lilis I, Papageorgopoulou M, Giotopoulou GA, Lianou M, Giopanou I, Kanellakis NI, Spella M, Agalioti T, Armenis V, Goldmann T, Marwitz S, Yull FE, Blackwell TS, Pasparakis M, Marazioti A, Stathopoulos GT
(2018) Cancer Res 78: 2939-2951
MeSH Terms: A549 Cells, Adenocarcinoma of Lung, Animals, Cell Line, Cell Line, Tumor, Disease Progression, HEK293 Cells, Humans, I-kappa B Kinase, Lung Neoplasms, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, NF-kappa B, Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases, Proto-Oncogene Proteins p21(ras), Signal Transduction
Show Abstract · Added March 31, 2020
Although oncogenic activation of NFκB has been identified in various tumors, the NFκB-activating kinases (inhibitor of NFκB kinases, IKK) responsible for this are elusive. In this study, we determined the role of IKKα and IKKβ in -mutant lung adenocarcinomas induced by the carcinogen urethane and by respiratory epithelial expression of oncogenic Using NFκB reporter mice and conditional deletions of IKKα and IKKβ, we identified two distinct early and late activation phases of NFκB during chemical and genetic lung adenocarcinoma development, which were characterized by nuclear translocation of B, IκBβ, and IKKα in tumor-initiated cells. IKKα was a cardinal tumor promoter in chemical and genetic -mutant lung adenocarcinoma, and respiratory epithelial IKKα-deficient mice were markedly protected from the disease. IKKα specifically cooperated with mutant for tumor induction in a cell-autonomous fashion, providing mutant cells with a survival advantage and IKKα was highly expressed in human lung adenocarcinoma, and a heat shock protein 90 inhibitor that blocks IKK function delivered superior effects against -mutant lung adenocarcinoma compared with a specific IKKβ inhibitor. These results demonstrate an actionable requirement for IKKα in -mutant lung adenocarcinoma, marking the kinase as a therapeutic target against this disease. These findings report a novel requirement for IKKα in mutant lung tumor formation, with potential therapeutic applications. .
©2018 American Association for Cancer Research.
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Ensartinib (X-396) in ALK-Positive Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Results from a First-in-Human Phase I/II, Multicenter Study.
Horn L, Infante JR, Reckamp KL, Blumenschein GR, Leal TA, Waqar SN, Gitlitz BJ, Sanborn RE, Whisenant JG, Du L, Neal JW, Gockerman JP, Dukart G, Harrow K, Liang C, Gibbons JJ, Holzhausen A, Lovly CM, Wakelee HA
(2018) Clin Cancer Res 24: 2771-2779
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase, Animals, Antineoplastic Agents, Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung, Cell Line, Tumor, Disease Models, Animal, Dose-Response Relationship, Drug, Female, Humans, Immunohistochemistry, In Situ Hybridization, Fluorescence, Kaplan-Meier Estimate, Lung Neoplasms, Male, Mice, Middle Aged, Mutation, Neoplasm Grading, Neoplasm Staging, Piperazines, Prognosis, Protein Kinase Inhibitors, Pyridazines, Rats, Treatment Outcome, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added September 10, 2020
Evaluate safety and determine the recommended phase II dose (RP2D) of ensartinib (X-396), a potent anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI), and evaluate preliminary pharmacokinetics and antitumor activity in a first-in-human, phase I/II clinical trial primarily in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In dose escalation, ensartinib was administered at doses of 25 to 250 mg once daily in patients with advanced solid tumors; in dose expansion, patients with advanced -positive NSCLC were administered 225 mg once daily. Patients who had received prior ALK TKI(s) and patients with brain metastases were eligible. Thirty-seven patients enrolled in dose escalation, and 60 enrolled in dose expansion. The most common treatment-related toxicities were rash (56%), nausea (36%), pruritus (28%), vomiting (26%), and fatigue (22%); 23% of patients experienced a treatment-related grade 3 to 4 toxicity (primarily rash and pruritus). The maximum tolerated dose was not reached, but the RP2D was chosen as 225 mg based on the frequency of rash observed at 250 mg without improvement in activity. Among the -positive efficacy evaluable patients treated at ≥200 mg, the response rate (RR) was 60%, and median progression-free survival (PFS) was 9.2 months. RR in ALK TKI-naïve patients was 80%, and median PFS was 26.2 months. In patients with prior crizotinib only, the RR was 69% and median PFS was 9.0 months. Responses were also observed in the central nervous system, with an intracranial RR of 64%. Ensartinib was active and generally well tolerated in patients with -positive NSCLC. .
©2018 American Association for Cancer Research.
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Overall and Central Obesity and Risk of Lung Cancer: A Pooled Analysis.
Yu D, Zheng W, Johansson M, Lan Q, Park Y, White E, Matthews CE, Sawada N, Gao YT, Robien K, Sinha R, Langhammer A, Kaaks R, Giovannucci EL, Liao LM, Xiang YB, Lazovich D, Peters U, Zhang X, Bueno-de-Mesquita B, Willett WC, Tsugane S, Takata Y, Smith-Warner SA, Blot W, Shu XO
(2018) J Natl Cancer Inst 110: 831-842
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Body Mass Index, Cohort Studies, Female, Humans, Lung Neoplasms, Male, Middle Aged, Obesity, Obesity, Abdominal, Risk Factors, Waist Circumference, Waist-Hip Ratio
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2018
Background - The obesity-lung cancer association remains controversial. Concerns over confounding by smoking and reverse causation persist. The influence of obesity type and effect modifications by race/ethnicity and tumor histology are largely unexplored.
Methods - We examined associations of body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), and waist-hip ratio (WHR) with lung cancer risk among 1.6 million Americans, Europeans, and Asians. Cox proportional hazard regression was used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) with adjustment for potential confounders. Analyses for WC/WHR were further adjusted for BMI. The joint effect of BMI and WC/WHR was also evaluated.
Results - During an average 12-year follow-up, 23 732 incident lung cancer cases were identified. While BMI was generally associated with a decreased risk, WC and WHR were associated with increased risk after controlling for BMI. These associations were seen 10 years before diagnosis in smokers and never smokers, were strongest among blacks, and varied by histological type. After excluding the first five years of follow-up, hazard ratios per 5 kg/m2 increase in BMI were 0.95 (95% CI = 0.90 to 1.00), 0.92 (95% CI = 0.89 to 0.95), and 0.89 (95% CI = 0.86 to 0.91) in never, former, and current smokers, and 0.86 (95% CI = 0.84 to 0.89), 0.94 (95% CI = 0.90 to 0.99), and 1.09 (95% CI = 1.03 to 1.15) for adenocarcinoma, squamous cell, and small cell carcinoma, respectively. Hazard ratios per 10 cm increase in WC were 1.09 (95% CI = 1.00 to 1.18), 1.12 (95% CI = 1.07 to 1.17), and 1.11 (95% CI = 1.07 to 1.16) in never, former, and current smokers, and 1.06 (95% CI = 1.01 to 1.12), 1.20 (95% CI = 1.12 to 1.29), and 1.13 (95% CI = 1.04 to 1.23) for adenocarcinoma, squamous cell, and small cell carcinoma, respectively. Participants with BMIs of less than 25 kg/m2 but high WC had a 40% higher risk (HR = 1.40, 95% CI = 1.26 to 1.56) than those with BMIs of 25 kg/m2 or greater but normal/moderate WC.
Conclusions - The inverse BMI-lung cancer association is not entirely due to smoking and reverse causation. Central obesity, particularly concurrent with low BMI, may help identify high-risk populations for lung cancer.
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14 MeSH Terms
Coronary Artery Calcium Scores and Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease Risk Stratification in Smokers.
Leigh A, McEvoy JW, Garg P, Carr JJ, Sandfort V, Oelsner EC, Budoff M, Herrington D, Yeboah J
(2019) JACC Cardiovasc Imaging 12: 852-861
MeSH Terms: Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Atherosclerosis, Computed Tomography Angiography, Coronary Angiography, Coronary Artery Disease, Early Detection of Cancer, Female, Humans, Incidence, Incidental Findings, Lung Neoplasms, Male, Middle Aged, Plaque, Atherosclerotic, Predictive Value of Tests, Prevalence, Prognosis, Radiography, Thoracic, Risk Assessment, Risk Factors, Smokers, Smoking, Time Factors, United States, Vascular Calcification
Show Abstract · Added January 10, 2020
OBJECTIVES - This study assessed the utility of the pooled cohort equation (PCE) and/or coronary artery calcium (CAC) for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) risk assessment in smokers, especially those who were lung cancer screening eligible (LCSE).
BACKGROUND - The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommended and the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services currently pays for annual screening for lung cancer with low-dose computed tomography scans in a specified group of cigarette smokers. CAC can be obtained from these low-dose scans. The incremental utility of CAC for ASCVD risk stratification remains unclear in this high-risk group.
METHODS - Of 6,814 MESA (Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis) participants, 3,356 (49.2% of total cohort) were smokers (2,476 former and 880 current), and 14.3% were LCSE. Kaplan-Meier, Cox proportional hazards, area under the curve, and net reclassification improvement (NRI) analyses were used to assess the association between PCE and/or CAC and incident ASCVD. Incident ASCVD was defined as coronary death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, or fatal or nonfatal stroke.
RESULTS - Smokers had a mean age of 62.1 years, 43.5% were female, and all had a mean of 23.0 pack-years of smoking. The LCSE sample had a mean age of 65.3 years, 39.1% were female, and all had a mean of 56.7 pack-years of smoking. After a mean of 11.1 years of follow-up 13.4% of all smokers and 20.8% of LCSE smokers had ASCVD events; 6.7% of all smokers and 14.2% of LCSE smokers with CAC = 0 had an ASCVD event during the follow-up. One SD increase in the PCE 10-year risk was associated with a 68% increase risk for ASCVD events in all smokers (hazard ratio: 1.68; 95% confidence interval: 1.57 to 1.80) and a 22% increase in risk for ASCVD events in the LCSE smokers (hazard ratio: 1.22; 95% confidence interval: 1.00 to 1.47). CAC was associated with increased ASCVD risk in all smokers and in LCSE smokers in all the Cox models. The C-statistic of the PCE for ASCVD was higher in all smokers compared with LCSE smokers (0.693 vs. 0.545). CAC significantly improved the C-statistics of the PCE in all smokers but not in LCSE smokers. The event and nonevent net reclassification improvements for all smokers and LCSE smokers were 0.018 and -0.126 versus 0.16 and -0.196, respectively.
CONCLUSIONS - In this well-characterized, multiethnic U.S. cohort, CAC was predictive of ASCVD in all smokers and in LCSE smokers but modestly improved discrimination over and beyond the PCE. However, 6.7% of all smokers and 14.2% of LCSE smokers with CAC = 0 had an ASCVD event during follow-up.
Copyright © 2019 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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Impact of EML4-ALK Variant on Resistance Mechanisms and Clinical Outcomes in ALK-Positive Lung Cancer.
Lin JJ, Zhu VW, Yoda S, Yeap BY, Schrock AB, Dagogo-Jack I, Jessop NA, Jiang GY, Le LP, Gowen K, Stephens PJ, Ross JS, Ali SM, Miller VA, Johnson ML, Lovly CM, Hata AN, Gainor JF, Iafrate AJ, Shaw AT, Ou SI
(2018) J Clin Oncol 36: 1199-1206
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase, Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung, Crizotinib, Drug Resistance, Neoplasm, Female, Humans, Lung Neoplasms, Male, Middle Aged, Mutation, Oncogene Proteins, Fusion, Prognosis, Protein Kinase Inhibitors, Retrospective Studies, Treatment Outcome, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added September 10, 2020
Purpose Advanced anaplastic lymphoma kinase ( ALK) fusion-positive non-small-cell lung cancers (NSCLCs) are effectively treated with ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). However, clinical outcomes in these patients vary, and the benefit of TKIs is limited as a result of acquired resistance. Emerging data suggest that the ALK fusion variant may affect clinical outcome, but the molecular basis for this association is unknown. Patients and Methods We identified 129 patients with ALK-positive NSCLC with known ALK variants. ALK resistance mutations and clinical outcomes on ALK TKIs were retrospectively evaluated according to ALK variant. A Foundation Medicine data set of 577 patients with ALK-positive NSCLC was also examined. Results The most frequent ALK variants were EML4-ALK variant 1 in 55 patients (43%) and variant 3 in 51 patients (40%). We analyzed 77 tumor biopsy specimens from patients with variants 1 and 3 who had progressed on an ALK TKI. ALK resistance mutations were significantly more common in variant 3 than in variant 1 (57% v 30%; P = .023). In particular, ALK G1202R was more common in variant 3 than in variant 1 (32% v 0%; P < .001). Analysis of the Foundation Medicine database revealed similar associations of variant 3 with ALK resistance mutation and with G1202R ( P = .010 and .015, respectively). Among patients treated with the third-generation ALK TKI lorlatinib, variant 3 was associated with a significantly longer progression-free survival than variant 1 (hazard ratio, 0.31; 95% CI, 0.12 to 0.79; P = .011). Conclusion Specific ALK variants may be associated with the development of ALK resistance mutations, particularly G1202R, and provide a molecular link between variant and clinical outcome. ALK variant thus represents a potentially important factor in the selection of next-generation ALK inhibitors.
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Established, emerging and elusive molecular targets in the treatment of lung cancer.
Gallant JN, Lovly CM
(2018) J Pathol 244: 565-577
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antineoplastic Agents, Biomarkers, Tumor, Clinical Decision-Making, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Genomics, Humans, Lung Neoplasms, Molecular Targeted Therapy, Pathology, Molecular, Phenotype, Precision Medicine, Predictive Value of Tests, Prognosis
Show Abstract · Added September 10, 2020
Although histological subtype still underlies tumour classification and treatment, the recognition that lung cancer is, largely, a genetic disease has prompted a push to reconfigure cancer taxonomies according to molecular criteria. In this review, we discuss established (e.g. EGFR, ALK, ROS1, and programmed cell death 1/programmed death-ligand 1), emerging (e.g. MET, RET, and NTRK) and elusive (e.g. TP53, KRAS, and MYC) molecular targets in the treatment of lung cancer. We synthesize a large and rapidly growing body of literature regarding the discovery and therapeutic inhibition of these targets in lung cancer. Copyright © 2018 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
Copyright © 2018 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
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