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Common mechanistic pathways in cancer and heart failure. A scientific roadmap on behalf of the Translational Research Committee of the Heart Failure Association (HFA) of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).
de Boer RA, Hulot JS, Tocchetti CG, Aboumsallem JP, Ameri P, Anker SD, Bauersachs J, Bertero E, Coats AJS, Čelutkienė J, Chioncel O, Dodion P, Eschenhagen T, Farmakis D, Bayes-Genis A, Jäger D, Jankowska EA, Kitsis RN, Konety SH, Larkin J, Lehmann L, Lenihan DJ, Maack C, Moslehi JJ, Müller OJ, Nowak-Sliwinska P, Piepoli MF, Ponikowski P, Pudil R, Rainer PP, Ruschitzka F, Sawyer D, Seferovic PM, Suter T, Thum T, van der Meer P, Van Laake LW, von Haehling S, Heymans S, Lyon AR, Backs J
(2020) Eur J Heart Fail 22: 2272-2289
MeSH Terms: Comorbidity, Heart Failure, Humans, Inflammation, Neoplasms, Risk Factors
Show Abstract · Added January 23, 2021
The co-occurrence of cancer and heart failure (HF) represents a significant clinical drawback as each disease interferes with the treatment of the other. In addition to shared risk factors, a growing body of experimental and clinical evidence reveals numerous commonalities in the biology underlying both pathologies. Inflammation emerges as a common hallmark for both diseases as it contributes to the initiation and progression of both HF and cancer. Under stress, malignant and cardiac cells change their metabolic preferences to survive, which makes these metabolic derangements a great basis to develop intersection strategies and therapies to combat both diseases. Furthermore, genetic predisposition and clonal haematopoiesis are common drivers for both conditions and they hold great clinical relevance in the context of personalized medicine. Additionally, altered angiogenesis is a common hallmark for failing hearts and tumours and represents a promising substrate to target in both diseases. Cardiac cells and malignant cells interact with their surrounding environment called stroma. This interaction mediates the progression of the two pathologies and understanding the structure and function of each stromal component may pave the way for innovative therapeutic strategies and improved outcomes in patients. The interdisciplinary collaboration between cardiologists and oncologists is essential to establish unified guidelines. To this aim, pre-clinical models that mimic the human situation, where both pathologies coexist, are needed to understand all the aspects of the bidirectional relationship between cancer and HF. Finally, adequately powered clinical studies, including patients from all ages, and men and women, with proper adjudication of both cancer and cardiovascular endpoints, are essential to accurately study these two pathologies at the same time.
© 2020 The Authors. European Journal of Heart Failure published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of European Society of Cardiology.
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6 MeSH Terms
Patent Ductus Arteriosus of the Preterm Infant.
Hamrick SEG, Sallmon H, Rose AT, Porras D, Shelton EL, Reese J, Hansmann G
(2020) Pediatrics 146:
MeSH Terms: Algorithms, Ductus Arteriosus, Patent, Humans, Infant, Newborn, Infant, Premature
Show Abstract · Added January 7, 2021
Postnatal ductal closure is stimulated by rising oxygen tension and withdrawal of vasodilatory mediators (prostaglandins, nitric oxide, adenosine) and by vasoconstrictors (endothelin-1, catecholamines, contractile prostanoids), ion channels, calcium flux, platelets, morphologic maturity, and a favorable genetic predisposition. A persistently patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) in preterm infants can have clinical consequences. Decreasing pulmonary vascular resistance, especially in extremely low gestational age newborns, increases left-to-right shunting through the ductus and increases pulmonary blood flow further, leading to interstitial pulmonary edema and volume load to the left heart. Potential consequences of left-to-right shunting via a hemodynamically significant patent ductus arteriosus (hsPDA) include increased risk for prolonged ventilation, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, necrotizing enterocolitis or focal intestinal perforation, intraventricular hemorrhage, and death. In the last decade, there has been a trend toward less aggressive treatment of PDA in preterm infants. However, there is a subgroup of infants who will likely benefit from intervention, be it pharmacologic, interventional, or surgical: (1) prophylactic intravenous indomethacin in highly selected extremely low gestational age newborns with PDA (<26 + 0/7 weeks' gestation, <750 g birth weight), (2) early targeted therapy of PDA in selected preterm infants at particular high risk for PDA-associated complications, and (3) PDA ligation, catheter intervention, or oral paracetamol may be considered as rescue options for hsPDA closure. The impact of catheter-based closure of hsPDA on clinical outcomes should be determined in future prospective studies. Finally, we provide a novel treatment algorithm for PDA in preterm infants that integrates the several treatment modalities in a staged approach.
Copyright © 2020 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.
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MeSH Terms
Aerosolized Calfactant for Newborns With Respiratory Distress: A Randomized Trial.
Cummings JJ, Gerday E, Minton S, Katheria A, Albert G, Flores-Torres J, Famuyide M, Lampland A, Guthrie S, Kuehn D, Weitkamp JH, Fort P, Abu Jawdeh EG, Ryan RM, Martin GC, Swanson JR, Mulrooney N, Eyal F, Gerstmann D, Kumar P, Wilding GE, Egan EA, AERO-02 STUDY INVESTIGATORS
(2020) Pediatrics 146:
MeSH Terms: Administration, Oral, Aerosols, Biological Products, Cohort Studies, Female, Gestational Age, Humans, Infant, Newborn, Intensive Care Units, Neonatal, Intubation, Intratracheal, Male, Nebulizers and Vaporizers, Prospective Studies, Pulmonary Surfactants, Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Newborn
Show Abstract · Added April 16, 2021
BACKGROUND - Exogenous surfactants to treat respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) are approved for tracheal instillation only; this requires intubation, often followed by positive pressure ventilation to promote distribution. Aerosol delivery offers a safer alternative, but clinical studies have had mixed results. We hypothesized that efficient aerosolization of a surfactant with low viscosity, early in the course of RDS, could reduce the need for intubation and instillation of liquid surfactant.
METHODS - A prospective, multicenter, randomized, unblinded comparison trial of aerosolized calfactant (Infasurf) in newborns with signs of RDS that required noninvasive respiratory support. Calfactant was aerosolized by using a Solarys nebulizer modified with a pacifier adapter; 6 mL/kg (210 mg phospholipid/kg body weight) were delivered directly into the mouth. Infants in the aerosol group received up to 3 treatments, at least 4 hours apart. Infants in the control group received usual care, determined by providers. Infants were intubated and given instilled surfactant for persistent or worsening respiratory distress, at their providers' discretion.
RESULTS - Among 22 NICUs, 457 infants were enrolled; gestation 23 to 41 (median 33) weeks and birth weight 595 to 4802 (median 1960) grams. In total, 230 infants were randomly assigned to aerosol; 225 received 334 treatments, starting at a median of 5 hours. The rates of intubation for surfactant instillation were 26% in the aerosol group and 50% in the usual care group ( < .0001). Respiratory outcomes up to 28 days of age were no different.
CONCLUSIONS - In newborns with early, mild to moderate respiratory distress, aerosolized calfactant at a dose of 210 mg phospholipid/kg body weight reduced intubation and surfactant instillation by nearly one-half.
Copyright © 2020 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.
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Increased canonical NF-kappaB signaling specifically in macrophages is sufficient to limit tumor progression in syngeneic murine models of ovarian cancer.
Hoover AA, Hufnagel DH, Harris W, Bullock K, Glass EB, Liu E, Barham W, Crispens MA, Khabele D, Giorgio TD, Wilson AJ, Yull FE
(2020) BMC Cancer 20: 970
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cell Line, Tumor, Disease Models, Animal, Disease Progression, Female, Humans, Macrophages, Mice, Mice, Transgenic, NF-kappa B, Signal Transduction
Show Abstract · Added January 29, 2021
BACKGROUND - New treatment options for ovarian cancer are urgently required. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are an attractive target for therapy; repolarizing TAMs from M2 (pro-tumor) to M1 (anti-tumor) phenotypes represents an important therapeutic goal. We have previously shown that upregulated NF-kappaB (NF-κB) signaling in macrophages promotes M1 polarization, but effects in the context of ovarian cancer are unknown. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the therapeutic potential of increasing macrophage NF-κB activity in immunocompetent mouse models of ovarian cancer.
METHODS - We have generated a transgenic mouse model, termed IKFM, which allows doxycycline-inducible overexpression of a constitutively active form of IKK2 (cIKK2) specifically within macrophages. The IKFM model was used to evaluate effects of increasing macrophage NF-κB activity in syngeneic murine TBR5 and ID8-Luc models of ovarian cancer in two temporal windows: 1) in established tumors, and 2) during tumor implantation and early tumor growth. Tumor weight, ascites volume, ascites supernatant and cells, and solid tumor were collected at sacrifice. Populations of macrophages and T cells within solid tumor and/or ascites were analyzed by immunofluorescent staining and qPCR, and soluble factors in ascitic fluid were analyzed by ELISA. Comparisons of control versus IKFM groups were performed by 2-tailed Mann-Whitney test, and a P-value < 0.05 was considered statistically significant.
RESULTS - Increased expression of the cIKK2 transgene in TAMs from IKFM mice was confirmed at the mRNA and protein levels. Tumors from IKFM mice, regardless of the timing of doxycycline (dox) administration, demonstrated greater necrosis and immune infiltration than control tumors. Analysis of IKFM ascites and tumors showed sustained shifts in macrophage populations away from the M2 and towards the anti-tumor M1 phenotype. There were also increased tumor-infiltrating CD3/CD8 T cells in IKFM mice, accompanied by higher levels of CXCL9, a T cell activating factor secreted by macrophages, in IKFM ascitic fluid.
CONCLUSIONS - In syngeneic ovarian cancer models, increased canonical NF-κB signaling in macrophages promoted anti-tumor TAM phenotypes and increased cytotoxic T cell infiltration, which was sufficient to limit tumor progression. This may present a novel translational approach for ovarian cancer treatment, with the potential to increase responses to T cell-directed therapy in future studies.
1 Communities
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11 MeSH Terms
A unified framework for joint-tissue transcriptome-wide association and Mendelian randomization analysis.
Zhou D, Jiang Y, Zhong X, Cox NJ, Liu C, Gamazon ER
(2020) Nat Genet 52: 1239-1246
MeSH Terms: Animals, Gene Expression Profiling, Genetic Association Studies, Humans, Lipoproteins, LDL, Mendelian Randomization Analysis, Mice, Models, Genetic, Multifactorial Inheritance, Predictive Value of Tests
Show Abstract · Added October 7, 2020
Here, we present a joint-tissue imputation (JTI) approach and a Mendelian randomization framework for causal inference, MR-JTI. JTI borrows information across transcriptomes of different tissues, leveraging shared genetic regulation, to improve prediction performance in a tissue-dependent manner. Notably, JTI includes the single-tissue imputation method PrediXcan as a special case and outperforms other single-tissue approaches (the Bayesian sparse linear mixed model and Dirichlet process regression). MR-JTI models variant-level heterogeneity (primarily due to horizontal pleiotropy, addressing a major challenge of transcriptome-wide association study interpretation) and performs causal inference with type I error control. We make explicit the connection between the genetic architecture of gene expression and of complex traits and the suitability of Mendelian randomization as a causal inference strategy for transcriptome-wide association studies. We provide a resource of imputation models generated from GTEx and PsychENCODE panels. Analysis of biobanks and meta-analysis data, and extensive simulations show substantially improved statistical power, replication and causal mapping rate for JTI relative to existing approaches.
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10 MeSH Terms
Prolonged Tracheal Intubation and the Association Between Patent Ductus Arteriosus and Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia: A Secondary Analysis of the PDA-TOLERATE trial.
Clyman RI, Kaempf J, Liebowitz M, Erdeve O, Bulbul A, Håkansson S, Lindqvist J, Farooqi A, Katheria A, Sauberan J, Singh J, Nelson K, Wickremasinghe A, Dong L, Hassinger DC, Aucott SW, Hayashi M, Heuchan AM, Carey WA, Derrick M, Fernandez E, Sankar M, Leone T, Perez J, Serize A, PDA-TOLERATE Trial Investigators
(2021) J Pediatr 229: 283-288.e2
MeSH Terms: Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia, Ductus Arteriosus, Patent, Female, Humans, Infant, Newborn, Intubation, Intratracheal, Male, Prospective Studies, Respiration, Artificial, Severity of Illness Index, Time Factors
Show Abstract · Added January 7, 2021
In the PDA-TOLERATE trial, persistent (even for several weeks) moderate to large patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) was not associated with an increased risk of BPD when the infant required <10 days of intubation. However, in infants requiring intubation for ≥10 days, prolonged PDA exposure (≥11 days) was associated with an increased risk of moderate/severe BPD.
Copyright © 2020 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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11 MeSH Terms
Retrospective evaluation of whole exome and genome mutation calls in 746 cancer samples.
Bailey MH, Meyerson WU, Dursi LJ, Wang LB, Dong G, Liang WW, Weerasinghe A, Li S, Li Y, Kelso S, MC3 Working Group, PCAWG novel somatic mutation calling methods working group, Saksena G, Ellrott K, Wendl MC, Wheeler DA, Getz G, Simpson JT, Gerstein MB, Ding L, PCAWG Consortium
(2020) Nat Commun 11: 4748
MeSH Terms: Base Composition, DNA, Intergenic, Databases, Genetic, Exome, Exons, Genome, Human, Humans, Mutation, Neoplasms, Retrospective Studies, Whole Exome Sequencing, Whole Genome Sequencing
Show Abstract · Added April 27, 2021
The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC) curated consensus somatic mutation calls using whole exome sequencing (WES) and whole genome sequencing (WGS), respectively. Here, as part of the ICGC/TCGA Pan-Cancer Analysis of Whole Genomes (PCAWG) Consortium, which aggregated whole genome sequencing data from 2,658 cancers across 38 tumour types, we compare WES and WGS side-by-side from 746 TCGA samples, finding that ~80% of mutations overlap in covered exonic regions. We estimate that low variant allele fraction (VAF < 15%) and clonal heterogeneity contribute up to 68% of private WGS mutations and 71% of private WES mutations. We observe that ~30% of private WGS mutations trace to mutations identified by a single variant caller in WES consensus efforts. WGS captures both ~50% more variation in exonic regions and un-observed mutations in loci with variable GC-content. Together, our analysis highlights technological divergences between two reproducible somatic variant detection efforts.
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Socioeconomic Factors and Intensive Care Unit-Related Cognitive Impairment.
Haddad DN, Mart MF, Wang L, Lindsell CJ, Raman R, Nordness MF, Sharp KW, Pandharipande PP, Girard TD, Ely EW, Patel MB
(2020) Ann Surg 272: 596-602
MeSH Terms: Aged, Cognitive Dysfunction, Female, Humans, Intensive Care Units, Male, Middle Aged, Prospective Studies, Risk Factors, Socioeconomic Factors, Time Factors
Show Abstract · Added May 25, 2021
OBJECTIVE - We aimed to identify socioeconomic and clinical risk factors for post-intensive care unit (ICU)-related long-term cognitive impairment (LTCI).
SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA - After delirium during ICU stay, LTCI has been increasingly recognized, but without attention to socioeconomic factors.
METHODS - We enrolled a prospective, multicenter cohort of ICU survivors with shock or respiratory failure from surgical and medical ICUs across 5 civilian and Veteran Affairs (VA) hospitals from 2010 to 2016. Our primary outcome was LTCI at 3- and 12 months post-hospital discharge defined by the Repeatable Battery for Assessment of Neuropsychological Symptoms (RBANS) global score. Covariates adjusted using multivariable linear regression included age, sex, race, AHRQ socioeconomic index, Charlson comorbidity, Framingham stroke risk, Sequential Organ Failure Assessment, duration of coma, delirium, hypoxemia, sepsis, education level, hospital type, insurance status, discharge disposition, and ICU drug exposures.
RESULTS - Of 1040 patients, 71% experienced delirium, and 47% and 41% of survivors had RBANS scores >1 standard deviation below normal at 3- and 12 months, respectively. Adjusted analysis indicated that delirium, non-White race, lower education, and civilian hospitals (as opposed to VA), were associated with at least a half standard deviation lower RBANS scores at 3- and 12 months (P ≤ 0.03). Sex, AHRQ socioeconomic index, insurance status, and discharge disposition were not associated with RBANS scores.
CONCLUSIONS - Socioeconomic and clinical risk factors, such as race, education, hospital type, and delirium duration, were linked to worse PICS ICU-related, LTCI. Further efforts may focus on improved identification of higher-risk groups to promote survivorship through emerging improvements in cognitive rehabilitation.
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Network Analysis Subtleties in ICU Structures and Outcomes.
Chen Y, Yan C, Patel MB
(2020) Am J Respir Crit Care Med 202: 1606-1607
MeSH Terms: Critical Care Nursing, Humans, Intensive Care Units, Patients
Added May 25, 2021
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A Quantitative Proteome Map of the Human Body.
Jiang L, Wang M, Lin S, Jian R, Li X, Chan J, Dong G, Fang H, Robinson AE, GTEx Consortium, Snyder MP
(2020) Cell 183: 269-283.e19
MeSH Terms: Gene Expression, Gene Expression Profiling, Humans, Proteome, Proteomics, RNA, RNA, Messenger, Transcriptome
Show Abstract · Added September 15, 2020
Determining protein levels in each tissue and how they compare with RNA levels is important for understanding human biology and disease as well as regulatory processes that control protein levels. We quantified the relative protein levels from over 12,000 genes across 32 normal human tissues. Tissue-specific or tissue-enriched proteins were identified and compared to transcriptome data. Many ubiquitous transcripts are found to encode tissue-specific proteins. Discordance of RNA and protein enrichment revealed potential sites of synthesis and action of secreted proteins. The tissue-specific distribution of proteins also provides an in-depth view of complex biological events that require the interplay of multiple tissues. Most importantly, our study demonstrated that protein tissue-enrichment information can explain phenotypes of genetic diseases, which cannot be obtained by transcript information alone. Overall, our results demonstrate how understanding protein levels can provide insights into regulation, secretome, metabolism, and human diseases.
Copyright © 2020 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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8 MeSH Terms