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Results: 11 to 20 of 33

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Autism and 15q11-q13 disorders: behavioral, genetic, and pathophysiological issues.
Dykens EM, Sutcliffe JS, Levitt P
(2004) Ment Retard Dev Disabil Res Rev 10: 284-91
MeSH Terms: Animals, Autistic Disorder, Brain, Chromosome Aberrations, Chromosomes, Human, Pair 15, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Genomic Imprinting, Humans, Interneurons, Mental Disorders, Phenotype, gamma-Aminobutyric Acid
Show Abstract · Added February 20, 2014
New insights into biological factors that underlie autism may be gained by comparing autism to other neurodevelopmental disorders that have autistic features and relatively well-delineated genetic etiologies or neurobiological findings. This review moves beyond global diagnoses of autism and instead uses an endophenotypic approach to compare specific clusters of autistic symptomatology to features of chromosome 15q11-q13 disorders. Paternally or maternally derived deficiencies of 15q11-q13 result in Prader-Willi or Angelman syndromes, and we first use a global approach to review potential autism susceptibility genes in the 15q11-q13 region. We then use a more trait-based approach to suggest possible ties between specific phenotypic characteristics of autism and Prader-Willi syndrome, namely savant-like skills. We conclude with insights from pathophysiological studies that implicate altered development of specific neuron types and circuits in the cerebral cortex as part of the pathophysiological processes associated with autism and mental retardation.
Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
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1 Members
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12 MeSH Terms
Functional characterization of a testis-specific DNA binding activity at the H19/Igf2 imprinting control region.
Bowman AB, Levorse JM, Ingram RS, Tilghman SM
(2003) Mol Cell Biol 23: 8345-51
MeSH Terms: Animals, Animals, Newborn, Base Sequence, Binding Sites, DNA, DNA Methylation, Female, Genomic Imprinting, Insulin-Like Growth Factor II, Male, Mice, Mice, Mutant Strains, Ovary, RNA, Long Noncoding, RNA, Untranslated, Testis
Show Abstract · Added June 9, 2010
The DNA methylation state of the H19/Igf2 imprinting control region (ICR) is differentially set during gametogenesis. To identify factors responsible for the paternally specific DNA methylation of the ICR, germ line and somatic extracts were screened for proteins that bind to the ICR in a germ line-specific manner. A specific DNA binding activity that was restricted to the male germ line and enriched in neonatal testis was identified. Its three binding sites within the ICR are very similar to the consensus sequence for nuclear receptor extended half sites. To determine if these binding sites are required for establishment of the paternal epigenetic state, a mouse strain in which the three sites were mutated was generated. The mutated ICR was able to establish a male-specific epigenetic state in sperm that was indistinguishable from that established by the wild-type ICR, indicating that these sequences are either redundant or have no function. An analysis of the methylated state of the mutant ICR in the soma revealed no differences from the wild-type ICR but did uncover in both mutant and wild-type chromosomes a significant relaxation in the stringency of the methylated state of the paternal allele and the unmethylated state of the maternal allele in neonatal and adult tissues.
1 Communities
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16 MeSH Terms
'Severe' Prader-Willi syndrome with a large deletion of chromosome 15 due to an unbalanced t(15,22)(q14;q11.2) translocation.
Matsumura M, Kubota T, Hidaka E, Wakui K, Kadowaki S, Ueta I, Shimizu T, Ueno I, Yamauchi K, Herzing LB, Nurmi EL, Sutcliffe JS, Fukushima Y, Katsuyama T
(2003) Clin Genet 63: 79-81
MeSH Terms: Chromosome Deletion, Chromosomes, Human, Pair 15, Fetal Growth Retardation, Genomic Imprinting, Humans, In Situ Hybridization, Fluorescence, Infant, Infant, Newborn, Male, Prader-Willi Syndrome, Translocation, Genetic
Added February 20, 2014
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11 MeSH Terms
Association of in vitro fertilization with Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome and epigenetic alterations of LIT1 and H19.
DeBaun MR, Niemitz EL, Feinberg AP
(2003) Am J Hum Genet 72: 156-60
MeSH Terms: Adult, Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome, Child, CpG Islands, DNA Methylation, Female, Fertilization in Vitro, Genomic Imprinting, Humans, Male, Membrane Proteins, Molecular Sequence Data, Phenotype, Potassium Channels, Voltage-Gated, RNA, Long Noncoding, RNA, Untranslated
Show Abstract · Added November 27, 2013
Recent data in humans and animals suggest that assisted reproductive technology (ART) might affect the epigenetics of early embryogenesis and might cause birth defects. We report the first evidence, to our knowledge, that ART is associated with a human overgrowth syndrome-namely, Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS). In a prospective study, the prevalence of ART was 4.6% (3 of 65), versus the background rate of 0.8% in the United States. A total of seven children with BWS were born after ART-five of whom were conceived after intracytoplasmic sperm injection. Molecular studies of six of the children indicate that five of the six have specific epigenetic alterations associated with BWS-four at LIT1 and one at both LIT1 and H19. We discuss the implications of our finding that ART is associated with human overgrowth, similar to the large offspring syndrome reported in ruminants.
1 Communities
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16 MeSH Terms
Epigenetic alterations of H19 and LIT1 distinguish patients with Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome with cancer and birth defects.
DeBaun MR, Niemitz EL, McNeil DE, Brandenburg SA, Lee MP, Feinberg AP
(2002) Am J Hum Genet 70: 604-11
MeSH Terms: Abdomen, Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome, Chromosomes, Human, Pair 11, Cohort Studies, DNA Methylation, Female, Fetal Macrosomia, Gene Frequency, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Genomic Imprinting, Humans, Hypertrophy, Hypoglycemia, Male, Membrane Proteins, Molecular Sequence Data, Neoplasms, Phenotype, Potassium Channels, Voltage-Gated, RNA, Long Noncoding, RNA, Untranslated, Registries, Uniparental Disomy
Show Abstract · Added November 27, 2013
Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) is a congenital cancer-predisposition syndrome associated with embryonal cancers, macroglossia, macrosomia, ear pits or ear creases, and midline abdominal-wall defects. The most common constitutional abnormalities in BWS are epigenetic, involving abnormal methylation of either H19 or LIT1, which encode untranslated RNAs on 11p15. We hypothesized that different epigenetic alterations would be associated with specific phenotypes in BWS. To test this hypothesis, we performed a case-cohort study, using the BWS Registry. The cohort consisted of 92 patients with BWS and molecular analysis of both H19 and LIT1, and these patients showed the same frequency of clinical phenotypes as those patients in the Registry from whom biological samples were not available. The frequency of altered DNA methylation of H19 in patients with cancer was significantly higher, 56% (9/16), than the frequency in patients without cancer, 17% (13/76; P=.002), and cancer was not associated with LIT1 alterations. Furthermore, the frequency of altered DNA methylation of LIT1 in patients with midline abdominal-wall defects and macrosomia was significantly higher, 65% (41/63) and 60% (46/77), respectively, than in patients without such defects, 34% (10/29) and 18% (2/11), respectively (P=.012 and P=.02, respectively). Additionally, paternal uniparental disomy (UPD) of 11p15 was associated with hemihypertrophy (P=.003), cancer (P=.03), and hypoglycemia (P=.05). These results define an epigenotype-phenotype relationship in BWS, in which aberrant methylation of H19 and LIT1 and UPD are strongly associated with cancer risk and specific birth defects.
1 Communities
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23 MeSH Terms
SNRPN methylation patterns in germ cell tumors as a reflection of primordial germ cell development.
Bussey KJ, Lawce HJ, Himoe E, Shu XO, Heerema NA, Perlman EJ, Olson SB, Magenis RE
(2001) Genes Chromosomes Cancer 32: 342-52
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Autoantigens, Child, Child, Preschool, DNA Methylation, DNA, Neoplasm, Female, Genomic Imprinting, Germ Cells, Germinoma, Humans, Infant, Infant, Newborn, Male, Ribonucleoproteins, Small Nuclear, Tumor Cells, Cultured, snRNP Core Proteins
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
Studies examining altered imprinted gene expression in cancer compare the observed expression pattern to the normal expression pattern for a given tissue of origin, usually the somatic expression pattern for the imprinted gene. Germ cell tumors (GCTs), however, require a developmental stage-dependent comparison. To explore using methylation as an indicator of germ cell development, we determined the pattern of methylation at the 5' untranslated region of SNRPN in 89 GCTs from both children and adults. Fifty-one of 84 tumors (60.7%) (12/30 (40%) of cultured pediatric GCTs, 23/36 (63.9%) of frozen adult GCTs, and 16/23 (69.5%) of frozen pediatric GCTs, with five samples having results from both cultured and uncultured material) demonstrated a nonsomatic methylation pattern after dual digestion with XbaI, NotI, and Southern blot analysis. In contrast, only 2 of 18 (11%) control samples (16 non-GCTs and 2 normal ovaries) exhibited a nonsomatic pattern. In both cases, the result was shown to be due to copy number differences between maternal and paternal homologs, unlike the GCTs in which there was no evidence of an uneven homolog number. A comparison of the data for only the gonadal GCTs and the control data showed a highly significant difference in the proportion of tumors with methylation alterations at this locus (P = 0.0000539). Since there is no published evidence of the involvement of SNRPN methylation changes in the development of malignancy, the data suggest that the methylation pattern of SNRPN in GCTs reflects that of the primordial germ cell giving rise to the tumor.
Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
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18 MeSH Terms
Lsh, a member of the SNF2 family, is required for genome-wide methylation.
Dennis K, Fan T, Geiman T, Yan Q, Muegge K
(2001) Genes Dev 15: 2940-4
MeSH Terms: Animals, Blotting, Southern, Chromatin, DNA Helicases, DNA Methylation, DNA-Binding Proteins, Genome, Genomic Imprinting, Genotype, Globins, Isoenzymes, Mice, Multigene Family, Nuclear Proteins, Phosphoglycerate Kinase, Protein Structure, Tertiary, Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction, Tissue Distribution, Transcription Factors
Show Abstract · Added April 7, 2010
Methylation patterns of the mammalian genome are thought to be crucial for development. The precise mechanisms designating specific genomic loci for methylation are not known. Targeted deletion of Lsh results in perinatal lethality with a rather normal development. We report here, however, that Lsh(-/-) mice show substantial loss of methylation throughout the genome. The hypomethylated loci comprise repetitive elements and single copy genes. This suggests that global genomic methylation is not absolutely required for normal embryogenesis. Based on the similarity of Lsh to other SNF2 chromatin remodeling proteins, it suggests that alteration of chromatin affects global methylation patterns in mice.
0 Communities
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19 MeSH Terms
Possible dosage effect of maternally expressed genes on visual recognition memory in Prader-Willi syndrome.
Joseph B, Egli M, Sutcliffe JS, Thompson T
(2001) Am J Med Genet 105: 71-5
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Computers, False Positive Reactions, Female, Gene Dosage, Genomic Imprinting, Humans, Male, Memory, Observer Variation, Pattern Recognition, Visual, Phenotype, Prader-Willi Syndrome
Show Abstract · Added February 20, 2014
Seventeen patients with Prader-Willi syndrome (7 with paternal deletion of chromosome 15q11-q13 and 10 with maternal uniparental disomy [UPD]), and 9 controls performed a computerized visual recognition task. A series of color digital photographs were presented; most were presented twice, but the remainder appeared only once. Photographs presented twice were separated in their presentation by either 0, 10, 30, 50 or 100 intervening photographs. Subjects indicated whether each photograph had been presented previously. This procedure was implemented twice, once using photographs of foods, and once using photographs of nonfood objects. As the number of intervening photographs between the first and second presentation increased, subjects were less likely to remember having seen the photograph before. Performance by UPD subjects was less affected by increasing the number of intervening photographs relative to the other two groups, suggesting they had superior visual recognition memory. This raises the possibility of a beneficial effect of having two copies maternally expressed genes on chromosome 15. UBE3A is suggested as a possible candidate for this effect.
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14 MeSH Terms
Loss of imprinting of a paternally expressed transcript, with antisense orientation to KVLQT1, occurs frequently in Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome and is independent of insulin-like growth factor II imprinting.
Lee MP, DeBaun MR, Mitsuya K, Galonek HL, Brandenburg S, Oshimura M, Feinberg AP
(1999) Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 96: 5203-8
MeSH Terms: Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome, Chromosomes, Human, Pair 11, Gene Expression Regulation, Genomic Imprinting, Humans, Insulin-Like Growth Factor II, KCNQ Potassium Channels, KCNQ1 Potassium Channel, Membrane Proteins, Potassium Channels, Potassium Channels, Voltage-Gated, Transcription, Genetic, Wilms Tumor
Show Abstract · Added November 27, 2013
Genomic imprinting plays a fundamental role in cancer and some hereditary diseases, including Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS), a disorder of prenatal overgrowth and predisposition to embryonal malignancies such as Wilms tumor. We have previously shown that the KVLQT1 gene on chromosomal band 11p15 is imprinted, with expression of the maternal allele, and that the maternal allele is disrupted in rare BWS patients with balanced germ-line chromosomal rearrangements. We now show that an antisense orientation transcript within KVLQT1, termed LIT1 (long QT intronic transcript 1) is expressed normally from the paternal allele, from which KVLQT1 transcription is silent, and that in the majority of patients with BWS, LIT1 is abnormally expressed from both the paternal and maternal alleles. Eight of sixteen informative BWS patients (50%) showed biallelic expression, i.e., loss of imprinting (LOI) of LIT1. Similarly, 21 of 36 (58%) BWS patients showed loss of maternal allele-specific methylation of a CpG island upstream of LIT1. Surprisingly, LOI of LIT1 was not linked to LOI of insulin-like growth factor II (IGF2), which was found in 2 of 10 (20%) BWS patients, even though LOI of IGF2 occurs frequently in Wilms and other tumors, and in some patients with BWS. Thus, LOI of LIT1 is the most common genetic alteration in BWS. We propose that 11p15 harbors two imprinted gene domains-a more centromeric domain including KVLQT1 and p57(KIP2), alterations in which are more common in BWS, and a more telomeric domain including IGF2, alterations in which are more common in cancer.
1 Communities
1 Members
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13 MeSH Terms
The spectrum of mutations in UBE3A causing Angelman syndrome.
Fang P, Lev-Lehman E, Tsai TF, Matsuura T, Benton CS, Sutcliffe JS, Christian SL, Kubota T, Halley DJ, Meijers-Heijboer H, Langlois S, Graham JM, Beuten J, Willems PJ, Ledbetter DH, Beaudet AL
(1999) Hum Mol Genet 8: 129-35
MeSH Terms: Angelman Syndrome, Animals, Base Sequence, DNA Mutational Analysis, DNA Primers, Exons, Female, Genetic Counseling, Genetic Variation, Genomic Imprinting, Humans, Ligases, Male, Mice, Mutation, Pedigree, Phenotype, Ubiquitin-Protein Ligases
Show Abstract · Added February 20, 2014
Angelman syndrome (AS) is characterized by mental retardation, absence of speech, seizures and motor dysfunction. AS is caused by maternal deletions for chromosome 15q11-q13, paternal uniparental disomy (UPD), imprinting defects or loss-of-function mutations in the UBE3A locus which encodes E6-AP ubiquitin-protein ligase. The UBE3A gene is imprinted with paternal silencing in human brain and similar silencing of the Ube3a locus in Purkinje cells and hippocampal neurons in the mouse. We have sequenced the major coding exons for UBE3A in 56 index patients with a clinical diagnosis of AS and a normal DNA methylation pattern. The analysis identified disease-causing mutations in 17 of 56 patients (30%) including 13 truncating mutations, two missense mutations, one single amino acid deletion and one stop codon mutation predicting an elongated protein. Mutations were identified in six of eight families (75%) with more than one affected case, and in 11 of 47 isolated cases (23%); no mutation was found in one family with two siblings, one with a typical and one with an atypical phenotype. Mutations were de novo in nine of the 11 isolated cases. An amino acid polymorphism of threonine substituted for alanine at codon 178 was identified, and a 3 bp length polymorphism was found in the intron upstream of exon 8. In all informative cases, phenotypic expression was consistent with imprinting with a normal phenotype when a mutation was on the paternal chromosome and an AS phenotype when a mutation was on the maternal chromosome. Laboratory diagnosis and genetic counseling for AS are complex, and mutation analysis is valuable in clinically typical AS patients with a normal methylation analysis.
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18 MeSH Terms