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Combined CB2 receptor agonist and photodynamic therapy synergistically inhibit tumor growth in triple negative breast cancer.
Zhang J, Zhang S, Liu Y, Su M, Ling X, Liu F, Ge Y, Bai M
(2018) Photodiagnosis Photodyn Ther 24: 185-191
MeSH Terms: Acetamides, Animals, Apoptosis, Cell Line, Tumor, Cell Proliferation, Cell Survival, Combined Modality Therapy, Female, Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic, Humans, Indoles, Mice, Neoplasm Recurrence, Local, Phenyl Ethers, Photochemotherapy, Photosensitizing Agents, Quality of Life, Receptor, Cannabinoid, CB2, Receptors, GABA, Singlet Oxygen, Triple Negative Breast Neoplasms, Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays
Show Abstract · Added April 2, 2019
Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is the deadliest form of breast cancer because it is more aggressive, diagnosed at later stage and more likely to develop local and systemic recurrence. Many patients do not experience adequate tumor control after current clinical treatments involving surgical removal, chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy, leading to disease progression and significantly decreased quality of life. Here we report a new combinatory therapy strategy involving cannabinoid-based medicine and photodynamic therapy (PDT) for the treatment of TNBC. This combinatory therapy targets two proteins upregulated in TNBC: the cannabinoid CB2 receptor (CBR, a G-protein coupled receptor) and translocator protein (TSPO, a mitochondria membrane receptor). We found that the combined CBR agonist and TSPO-PDT treatment resulted in synergistic inhibition in TNBC cell and tumor growth. This combinatory therapy approach provides new opportunities to treat TNBC with high efficacy. In addition, this study provides new evidence on the therapeutic potential of CBR agonists for cancer.
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
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22 MeSH Terms
AXL Mediates Esophageal Adenocarcinoma Cell Invasion through Regulation of Extracellular Acidification and Lysosome Trafficking.
Maacha S, Hong J, von Lersner A, Zijlstra A, Belkhiri A
(2018) Neoplasia 20: 1008-1022
MeSH Terms: Adenocarcinoma, Animals, Benzocycloheptenes, Biological Transport, Cathepsin B, Cell Line, Tumor, Chick Embryo, Chorioallantoic Membrane, Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition, Esophageal Neoplasms, Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic, Humans, Hydrogen-Ion Concentration, Lactates, Lysosomes, Monocarboxylic Acid Transporters, Proto-Oncogene Proteins, Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Kinases, Symporters, Triazoles
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2019
Esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) is a highly aggressive malignancy that is characterized by resistance to chemotherapy and a poor clinical outcome. The overexpression of the receptor tyrosine kinase AXL is frequently associated with unfavorable prognosis in EAC. Although it is well documented that AXL mediates cancer cell invasion as a downstream effector of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, the precise molecular mechanism underlying this process is not completely understood. Herein, we demonstrate for the first time that AXL mediates cell invasion through the regulation of lysosomes peripheral distribution and cathepsin B secretion in EAC cell lines. Furthermore, we show that AXL-dependent peripheral distribution of lysosomes and cell invasion are mediated by extracellular acidification, which is potentiated by AXL-induced secretion of lactate through AKT-NF-κB-dependent MCT-1 regulation. Our novel mechanistic findings support future clinical studies to evaluate the therapeutic potential of the AXL inhibitor R428 (BGB324) in highly invasive EAC.
Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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MeSH Terms
An Integrated, High-Throughput Strategy for Multiomic Systems Level Analysis.
Gutierrez DB, Gant-Branum RL, Romer CE, Farrow MA, Allen JL, Dahal N, Nei YW, Codreanu SG, Jordan AT, Palmer LD, Sherrod SD, McLean JA, Skaar EP, Norris JL, Caprioli RM
(2018) J Proteome Res 17: 3396-3408
MeSH Terms: Gene Expression Profiling, Genomics, HL-60 Cells, Humans, Metabolomics, NF-E2-Related Factor 2, NF-kappa B, Proteomics, Signal Transduction, Systems Biology, Zinc
Show Abstract · Added August 27, 2018
Proteomics, metabolomics, and transcriptomics generate comprehensive data sets, and current biocomputational capabilities allow their efficient integration for systems biology analysis. Published multiomics studies cover methodological advances as well as applications to biological questions. However, few studies have focused on the development of a high-throughput, unified sample preparation approach to complement high-throughput omic analytics. This report details the automation, benchmarking, and application of a strategy for transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic analyses from a common sample. The approach, sample preparation for multi-omics technologies (SPOT), provides equivalent performance to typical individual omic preparation methods but greatly enhances throughput and minimizes the resources required for multiomic experiments. SPOT was applied to a multiomics time course experiment for zinc-treated HL-60 cells. The data reveal Zn effects on NRF2 antioxidant and NFkappaB signaling. High-throughput approaches such as these are critical for the acquisition of temporally resolved, multicondition, large multiomic data sets such as those necessary to assess complex clinical and biological concerns. Ultimately, this type of approach will provide an expanded understanding of challenging scientific questions across many fields.
1 Communities
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11 MeSH Terms
The CeNGEN Project: The Complete Gene Expression Map of an Entire Nervous System.
Hammarlund M, Hobert O, Miller DM, Sestan N
(2018) Neuron 99: 430-433
MeSH Terms: Animals, Caenorhabditis elegans, Caenorhabditis elegans Proteins, Chromosome Mapping, Gene Expression Profiling, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (U.S.), Nervous System, Nervous System Physiological Phenomena, United States
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
Differential gene expression defines individual neuron types and determines how each contributes to circuit physiology and responds to injury and disease. The C. elegans Neuronal Gene Expression Map & Network (CeNGEN) will establish a comprehensive gene expression atlas of an entire nervous system at single-neuron resolution.
Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.
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9 MeSH Terms
Identification of a gene-expression predictor for diagnosis and personalized stratification of lupus patients.
Ding Y, Li H, He X, Liao W, Yi Z, Yi J, Chen Z, Moore DJ, Yi Y, Xiang W
(2018) PLoS One 13: e0198325
MeSH Terms: Biomarkers, Female, Gene Expression Regulation, Humans, Interferons, Male, Monitoring, Physiologic, Precision Medicine, Severity of Illness Index, Signal Transduction, Transcriptome
Show Abstract · Added July 6, 2018
Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations and degrees of severity. Few genomic biomarkers for SLE have been validated and employed to inform clinical classifications and decisions. To discover and assess the gene-expression based SLE predictors in published studies, we performed a meta-analysis using our established signature database and a data similarity-driven strategy. From 13 training data sets on SLE gene-expression studies, we identified a SLE meta-signature (SLEmetaSig100) containing 100 concordant genes that are involved in DNA sensors and the IFN signaling pathway. We rigorously examined SLEmetaSig100 with both retrospective and prospective validation in two independent data sets. Using unsupervised clustering, we retrospectively elucidated that SLEmetaSig100 could classify clinical samples into two groups that correlated with SLE disease status and disease activities. More importantly, SLEmetaSig100 enabled personalized stratification demonstrating its ability to prospectively predict SLE disease at the individual patient level. To evaluate the performance of SLEmetaSig100 in predicting SLE, we predicted 1,171 testing samples to be either non-SLE or SLE with positive predictive value (97-99%), specificity (85%-84%), and sensitivity (60-84%). Our study suggests that SLEmetaSig100 has enhanced predictive value to facilitate current SLE clinical classification and provides personalized disease activity monitoring.
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11 MeSH Terms
Using an atlas of gene regulation across 44 human tissues to inform complex disease- and trait-associated variation.
Gamazon ER, Segrè AV, van de Bunt M, Wen X, Xi HS, Hormozdiari F, Ongen H, Konkashbaev A, Derks EM, Aguet F, Quan J, GTEx Consortium, Nicolae DL, Eskin E, Kellis M, Getz G, McCarthy MI, Dermitzakis ET, Cox NJ, Ardlie KG
(2018) Nat Genet 50: 956-967
MeSH Terms: Disease, Gene Expression, Gene Expression Profiling, Gene Expression Regulation, Genome-Wide Association Study, Genotype, Humans, Phenotype, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Quantitative Trait Loci, Quantitative Trait, Heritable
Show Abstract · Added July 1, 2018
We apply integrative approaches to expression quantitative loci (eQTLs) from 44 tissues from the Genotype-Tissue Expression project and genome-wide association study data. About 60% of known trait-associated loci are in linkage disequilibrium with a cis-eQTL, over half of which were not found in previous large-scale whole blood studies. Applying polygenic analyses to metabolic, cardiovascular, anthropometric, autoimmune, and neurodegenerative traits, we find that eQTLs are significantly enriched for trait associations in relevant pathogenic tissues and explain a substantial proportion of the heritability (40-80%). For most traits, tissue-shared eQTLs underlie a greater proportion of trait associations, although tissue-specific eQTLs have a greater contribution to some traits, such as blood pressure. By integrating information from biological pathways with eQTL target genes and applying a gene-based approach, we validate previously implicated causal genes and pathways, and propose new variant and gene associations for several complex traits, which we replicate in the UK BioBank and BioVU.
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11 MeSH Terms
Transcriptional profiling of the ductus arteriosus: Comparison of rodent microarrays and human RNA sequencing.
Yarboro MT, Durbin MD, Herington JL, Shelton EL, Zhang T, Ebby CG, Stoller JZ, Clyman RI, Reese J
(2018) Semin Perinatol 42: 212-220
MeSH Terms: Animals, Animals, Newborn, Ductus Arteriosus, Embryo, Mammalian, Gene Expression Profiling, Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental, Genetic Association Studies, Humans, Microarray Analysis, Models, Animal, Rodentia, Sequence Analysis, RNA, Species Specificity, Vascular Patency
Show Abstract · Added November 26, 2018
DA closure is crucial for the transition from fetal to neonatal life. This closure is supported by changes to the DA's signaling and structural properties that distinguish it from neighboring vessels. Examining transcriptional differences between these vessels is key to identifying genes or pathways responsible for DA closure. Several microarray studies have explored the DA transcriptome in animal models but varied experimental designs have led to conflicting results. Thorough transcriptomic analysis of the human DA has yet to be performed. A clear picture of the DA transcriptome is key to guiding future research endeavors, both to allow more targeted treatments in the clinical setting, and to understand the basic biology of DA function. In this review, we use a cross-species cross-platform analysis to consider all available published rodent microarray data and novel human RNAseq data in order to provide high priority candidate genes for consideration in future DA studies.
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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14 MeSH Terms
Quantitative in vivo whole genome motility screen reveals novel therapeutic targets to block cancer metastasis.
Stoletov K, Willetts L, Paproski RJ, Bond DJ, Raha S, Jovel J, Adam B, Robertson AE, Wong F, Woolner E, Sosnowski DL, Bismar TA, Wong GK, Zijlstra A, Lewis JD
(2018) Nat Commun 9: 2343
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cell Line, Tumor, Cell Movement, Chick Embryo, Collagen, Female, Gene Expression Profiling, Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic, Humans, Male, Mice, Mice, Nude, Mice, SCID, Neoplasm Invasiveness, Neoplasm Metastasis, Neoplasm Transplantation, Phenotype, Prostatic Neoplasms, RNA Interference, RNA, Small Interfering
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2019
Metastasis is the most lethal aspect of cancer, yet current therapeutic strategies do not target its key rate-limiting steps. We have previously shown that the entry of cancer cells into the blood stream, or intravasation, is highly dependent upon in vivo cancer cell motility, making it an attractive therapeutic target. To systemically identify genes required for tumor cell motility in an in vivo tumor microenvironment, we established a novel quantitative in vivo screening platform based on intravital imaging of human cancer metastasis in ex ovo avian embryos. Utilizing this platform to screen a genome-wide shRNA library, we identified a panel of novel genes whose function is required for productive cancer cell motility in vivo, and whose expression is closely associated with metastatic risk in human cancers. The RNAi-mediated inhibition of these gene targets resulted in a nearly total (>99.5%) block of spontaneous cancer metastasis in vivo.
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MeSH Terms
A potential therapeutic role for angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 in human pulmonary arterial hypertension.
Hemnes AR, Rathinasabapathy A, Austin EA, Brittain EL, Carrier EJ, Chen X, Fessel JP, Fike CD, Fong P, Fortune N, Gerszten RE, Johnson JA, Kaplowitz M, Newman JH, Piana R, Pugh ME, Rice TW, Robbins IM, Wheeler L, Yu C, Loyd JE, West J
(2018) Eur Respir J 51:
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Animals, Biomarkers, Cytokines, Female, Gene Expression, Humans, Hypertension, Pulmonary, Male, Middle Aged, Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A, Pilot Projects, Proof of Concept Study, Proto-Oncogene Proteins, Pulmonary Artery, Receptors, G-Protein-Coupled, Superoxide Dismutase, Swine, Vascular Resistance
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a deadly disease with no cure. Alternate conversion of angiotensin II (AngII) to angiotensin-(1-7) (Ang-(1-7)) by angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) resulting in Mas receptor (Mas1) activation improves rodent models of PAH. Effects of recombinant human (rh) ACE2 in human PAH are unknown. Our objective was to determine the effects of rhACE2 in PAH.We defined the molecular effects of Mas1 activation using porcine pulmonary arteries, measured AngII/Ang-(1-7) levels in human PAH and conducted a phase IIa, open-label pilot study of a single infusion of rhACE2 (GSK2586881, 0.2 or 0.4 mg·kg intravenously).Superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) and inflammatory gene expression were identified as markers of Mas1 activation. After confirming reduced plasma ACE2 activity in human PAH, five patients were enrolled in the trial. GSK2586881 was well tolerated with significant improvement in cardiac output and pulmonary vascular resistance. GSK2586881 infusion was associated with reduced plasma markers of inflammation within 2-4 h and increased SOD2 plasma protein at 2 weeks.PAH is characterised by reduced ACE2 activity. Augmentation of ACE2 in a pilot study was well tolerated, associated with improved pulmonary haemodynamics and reduced markers of oxidant and inflammatory mediators. Targeting this pathway may be beneficial in human PAH.
Copyright ©ERS 2018.
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20 MeSH Terms
Gene expression in triple-negative breast cancer in relation to survival.
Wang S, Beeghly-Fadiel A, Cai Q, Cai H, Guo X, Shi L, Wu J, Ye F, Qiu Q, Zheng Y, Zheng W, Bao PP, Shu XO
(2018) Breast Cancer Res Treat 171: 199-207
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Biomarkers, Tumor, Female, Gene Expression, Gene Expression Profiling, Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic, Humans, Middle Aged, Neoplasm Grading, Neoplasm Staging, Population Surveillance, Prognosis, Registries, Survival Analysis, Triple Negative Breast Neoplasms
Show Abstract · Added December 6, 2018
PURPOSE - The identification of biomarkers related to the prognosis of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is critically important for improved understanding of the biology that drives TNBC progression.
METHODS - We evaluated gene expression in total RNA isolated from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor samples using the NanoString nCounter assay for 469 TNBC cases from the Shanghai Breast Cancer Survival Study. We used Cox regression to quantify Hazard Ratios (HR) and corresponding confidence intervals (CI) for overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) in models that included adjustment for breast cancer intrinsic subtype. Of 302 genes in our discovery analysis, 22 were further evaluated in relation to OS among 134 TNBC cases from the Nashville Breast Health Study and the Southern Community Cohort Study; 16 genes were further evaluated in relation to DFS in 335 TNBC cases from four gene expression omnibus datasets. Fixed-effect meta-analysis was used to combine results across data sources.
RESULTS - Twofold higher expression of EOMES (HR 0.90, 95% CI 0.83-0.97), RASGRP1 (HR 0.89, 95% CI 0.82-0.97), and SOD2 (HR 0.80, 95% CI 0.66-0.96) was associated with better OS. Twofold higher expression of EOMES (HR 0.89, 95% CI 0.81-0.97) and RASGRP1 (HR 0.87, 95% CI 0.81-0.95) was also associated with better DFS. On the contrary, a doubling of FA2H (HR 1.14, 95% CI 1.06-1.22) and GSPT1 (HR 1.33, 95% CI 1.14-1.55) expression was associated with shorter DFS.
CONCLUSIONS - We identified five genes (EOMES, FA2H, GSPT1, RASGRP1, and SOD2) that may serve as potential prognostic biomarkers and/or therapeutic targets for TNBC.
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16 MeSH Terms