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Simultaneous control of error rates in fMRI data analysis.
Kang H, Blume J, Ombao H, Badre D
(2015) Neuroimage 123: 102-13
MeSH Terms: Brain Mapping, Computer Simulation, Data Interpretation, Statistical, Frontal Lobe, Humans, Likelihood Functions, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Research Design
Show Abstract · Added February 22, 2016
The key idea of statistical hypothesis testing is to fix, and thereby control, the Type I error (false positive) rate across samples of any size. Multiple comparisons inflate the global (family-wise) Type I error rate and the traditional solution to maintaining control of the error rate is to increase the local (comparison-wise) Type II error (false negative) rates. However, in the analysis of human brain imaging data, the number of comparisons is so large that this solution breaks down: the local Type II error rate ends up being so large that scientifically meaningful analysis is precluded. Here we propose a novel solution to this problem: allow the Type I error rate to converge to zero along with the Type II error rate. It works because when the Type I error rate per comparison is very small, the accumulation (or global) Type I error rate is also small. This solution is achieved by employing the likelihood paradigm, which uses likelihood ratios to measure the strength of evidence on a voxel-by-voxel basis. In this paper, we provide theoretical and empirical justification for a likelihood approach to the analysis of human brain imaging data. In addition, we present extensive simulations that show the likelihood approach is viable, leading to "cleaner"-looking brain maps and operational superiority (lower average error rate). Finally, we include a case study on cognitive control related activation in the prefrontal cortex of the human brain.
Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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2 Members
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8 MeSH Terms
Co-activation based parcellation of the human frontal pole.
Ray KL, Zald DH, Bludau S, Riedel MC, Bzdok D, Yanes J, Falcone KE, Amunts K, Fox PT, Eickhoff SB, Laird AR
(2015) Neuroimage 123: 200-11
MeSH Terms: Algorithms, Brain, Brain Mapping, Cluster Analysis, Cognition, Emotions, Frontal Lobe, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Neural Pathways, Positron-Emission Tomography
Show Abstract · Added April 6, 2017
Historically, the human frontal pole (FP) has been considered as a single architectonic area. Brodmann's area 10 is located in the frontal lobe with known contributions in the execution of various higher order cognitive processes. However, recent cytoarchitectural studies of the FP in humans have shown that this portion of cortex contains two distinct cytoarchitectonic regions. Since architectonic differences are accompanied by differential connectivity and functions, the frontal pole qualifies as a candidate region for exploratory parcellation into functionally discrete sub-regions. We investigated whether this functional heterogeneity is reflected in distinct segregations within cytoarchitectonically defined FP-areas using meta-analytic co-activation based parcellation (CBP). The CBP method examined the co-activation patterns of all voxels within the FP as reported in functional neuroimaging studies archived in the BrainMap database. Voxels within the FP were subsequently clustered into sub-regions based on the similarity of their respective meta-analytically derived co-activation maps. Performing this CBP analysis on the FP via k-means clustering produced a distinct 3-cluster parcellation for each hemisphere corresponding to previously identified cytoarchitectural differences. Post-hoc functional characterization of clusters via BrainMap metadata revealed that lateral regions of the FP mapped to memory and emotion domains, while the dorso- and ventromedial clusters were associated broadly with emotion and social cognition processes. Furthermore, the dorsomedial regions contain an emphasis on theory of mind and affective related paradigms whereas ventromedial regions couple with reward tasks. Results from this study support previous segregations of the FP and provide meta-analytic contributions to the ongoing discussion of elucidating functional architecture within human FP.
Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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11 MeSH Terms
Synchronizing theta oscillations with direct-current stimulation strengthens adaptive control in the human brain.
Reinhart RM, Zhu J, Park S, Woodman GF
(2015) Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 112: 9448-53
MeSH Terms: Adult, Brain, Brain Mapping, Case-Control Studies, Cognition, Computer Simulation, Electroencephalography, Female, Frontal Lobe, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Oscillometry, Prefrontal Cortex, Schizophrenia, Theta Rhythm
Show Abstract · Added July 28, 2015
Executive control and flexible adjustment of behavior following errors are essential to adaptive functioning. Loss of adaptive control may be a biomarker of a wide range of neuropsychiatric disorders, particularly in the schizophrenia spectrum. Here, we provide support for the view that oscillatory activity in the frontal cortex underlies adaptive adjustments in cognitive processing following errors. Compared with healthy subjects, patients with schizophrenia exhibited low frequency oscillations with abnormal temporal structure and an absence of synchrony over medial-frontal and lateral-prefrontal cortex following errors. To demonstrate that these abnormal oscillations were the origin of the impaired adaptive control in patients with schizophrenia, we applied noninvasive dc electrical stimulation over the medial-frontal cortex. This noninvasive stimulation descrambled the phase of the low-frequency neural oscillations that synchronize activity across cortical regions. Following stimulation, the behavioral index of adaptive control was improved such that patients were indistinguishable from healthy control subjects. These results provide unique causal evidence for theories of executive control and cortical dysconnectivity in schizophrenia.
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16 MeSH Terms
Microcircuitry of agranular frontal cortex: contrasting laminar connectivity between occipital and frontal areas.
Ninomiya T, Dougherty K, Godlove DC, Schall JD, Maier A
(2015) J Neurophysiol 113: 3242-55
MeSH Terms: Action Potentials, Animals, Brain Mapping, Female, Frontal Lobe, Macaca mulatta, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Microelectrodes, Nerve Net, Neurons, Occipital Lobe, Spectrum Analysis, Visual Pathways
Show Abstract · Added February 4, 2016
Neocortex is striking in its laminar architecture. Tracer studies have uncovered anatomical connectivity among laminae, but the functional connectivity between laminar compartments is still largely unknown. Such functional connectivity can be discerned through spontaneous neural correlations during rest. Previous work demonstrated a robust pattern of mesoscopic resting-state connectivity in macaque primary visual cortex (V1) through interlaminar cross-frequency coupling. Here we investigated whether this pattern generalizes to other cortical areas by comparing resting-state laminar connectivity between V1 and the supplementary eye field (SEF), a frontal area lacking a granular layer 4 (L4). Local field potentials (LFPs) were recorded with linear microelectrode arrays from all laminae of granular V1 and agranular SEF while monkeys rested in darkness. We found substantial differences in the relationship between the amplitude of gamma-band (>30 Hz) LFP and the phase of alpha-band (7-14 Hz) LFP between these areas. In V1, gamma amplitudes in L2/3 and L5 were coupled with alpha-band LFP phase in L5, as previously described. In contrast, in SEF phase-amplitude coupling was prominent within L3 and much weaker across layers. These results suggest that laminar interactions in agranular SEF are unlike those in granular V1. Thus the intrinsic functional connectivity of the cortical microcircuit does not seem to generalize across cortical areas.
Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.
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2 Members
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14 MeSH Terms
Frontal operculum gliomas: language outcome following resection.
Rolston JD, Englot DJ, Benet A, Li J, Cha S, Berger MS
(2015) J Neurosurg 122: 725-34
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Brain Mapping, Brain Neoplasms, Cohort Studies, Female, Frontal Lobe, Glioma, Humans, Language Disorders, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Middle Aged, Neuroimaging, Neurosurgical Procedures, Postoperative Complications, Retrospective Studies, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added August 12, 2016
OBJECT - The dominant hemisphere frontal operculum may contain critical speech and language pathways, and due to these properties, patients with tumors of the opercular region may be at higher risk for postoperative speech dysfunction. However, the likelihood of incurring temporary or permanent language dysfunction is unknown.
METHODS - The authors retrospectively analyzed their cohort of patients with frontal gliomas to identify those tumors that predominantly involved the dominant frontal operculum. Each tumor was classified as involving the pars orbitalis, pars triangularis, pars opercularis, or a combination of some or all of these areas. The authors then identified and compared characteristics between those patients experiencing transient or permanent speech deficits, as opposed to those with no language dysfunction.
RESULTS - Forty-three patients were identified for inclusion in this analysis. Transient deficits occurred in 12 patients (27.9%), while 4 patients (9.8%) had persistent deficits involving language. Individuals with preoperative language deficits and patients with seizures characterized by speech dysfunction appear to be at the highest risk to develop a deficit (relative risks 3.09 and 1.75, respectively). No patient with a tumor involving the pars orbitalis experienced a persistent deficit.
CONCLUSIONS - Resection of gliomas is widely recognized as a critical element of improved outcome. Given the low rate of language morbidity reported in this group of patients, resection of gliomas within the dominant frontal operculum is well-tolerated with acceptable morbidity and, in this particular location, should not be a deterrent in the overall management of these tumors.
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18 MeSH Terms
Impaired working memory in geriatric depression: an FMRI study.
Dumas JA, Newhouse PA
(2015) Am J Geriatr Psychiatry 23: 433-436
MeSH Terms: Depressive Disorder, Major, Female, Frontal Lobe, Functional Neuroimaging, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Memory Disorders, Memory, Short-Term, Middle Aged, Neuropsychological Tests, Parietal Lobe, Psychomotor Performance
Show Abstract · Added February 22, 2016
OBJECTIVE - Older adults with major depressive disorder (MDD) experience poor cognitive and behavioral outcomes as MDD occurs in the context of other age-related brain changes. Patients with depression often have impairments on measures of frontal lobe functioning such as working memory. Understanding the effects of depression on cognitive functioning in older adults is important for the development of treatment strategies that focus on cognitive changes as well as mood.
METHODS - Eleven older adults with current MDD and 12 nondepressed comparison participants (all aged 60 years and older) performed the N-back test of working memory during fMRI.
RESULTS - Depressed older adults performed worse than nondepressed participants on the N-back task. Depressed older adults had decreased lateral frontal and parietal activation during the most difficult working memory load condition on the N-back compared with nondepressed older adults.
CONCLUSION - Cognitive dysfunction in geriatric depression may be related to reorganization of brain networks involved in working memory.
Copyright © 2015 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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1 Members
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13 MeSH Terms
Microcircuitry of agranular frontal cortex: testing the generality of the canonical cortical microcircuit.
Godlove DC, Maier A, Woodman GF, Schall JD
(2014) J Neurosci 34: 5355-69
MeSH Terms: Action Potentials, Animals, Brain Mapping, Evoked Potentials, Visual, Female, Frontal Lobe, Interneurons, Macaca mulatta, Macaca radiata, Male, Pyramidal Cells, Reaction Time, Synaptic Potentials, Visual Cortex
Show Abstract · Added February 12, 2015
We investigated whether a frontal area that lacks granular layer IV, supplementary eye field, exhibits features of laminar circuitry similar to those observed in primary sensory areas. We report, for the first time, visually evoked local field potentials (LFPs) and spiking activity recorded simultaneously across all layers of agranular frontal cortex using linear electrode arrays. We calculated current source density from the LFPs and compared the laminar organization of evolving sinks to those reported in sensory areas. Simultaneous, transient synaptic current sinks appeared first in layers III and V followed by more prolonged current sinks in layers I/II and VI. We also found no variation of single- or multi-unit visual response latency across layers, and putative pyramidal neurons and interneurons displayed similar response latencies. Many units exhibited pronounced discharge suppression that was strongest in superficial relative to deep layers. Maximum discharge suppression also occurred later in superficial than in deep layers. These results are discussed in the context of the canonical cortical microcircuit model originally formulated to describe early sensory cortex. The data indicate that agranular cortex resembles sensory areas in certain respects, but the cortical microcircuit is modified in nontrivial ways.
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2 Members
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14 MeSH Terms
Treatment course with antidepressant therapy in late-life depression.
Sheline YI, Disabato BM, Hranilovich J, Morris C, D'Angelo G, Pieper C, Toffanin T, Taylor WD, MacFall JR, Wilkins C, Barch DM, Welsh-Bohmer KA, Steffens DC, Krishnan RR, Doraiswamy PM
(2012) Am J Psychiatry 169: 1185-93
MeSH Terms: Aged, Amygdala, Antidepressive Agents, Brain, Caudate Nucleus, Cerebral Cortex, Cognition Disorders, Depressive Disorder, Major, Female, Frontal Lobe, Hippocampus, Humans, Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Middle Aged, Neural Pathways, Neuropsychological Tests, Organ Size, Parahippocampal Gyrus, Personality Inventory, Prospective Studies, Psychometrics, Reaction Time, Sertraline, Treatment Outcome
Show Abstract · Added May 20, 2014
OBJECTIVE - In order to assess the effect of gray matter volumes and cortical thickness on antidepressant treatment response in late-life depression, the authors examined the relationship between brain regions identified a priori and Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) scores over the course of an antidepressant treatment trial.
METHOD - In a nonrandomized prospective trial, 168 patients who were at least 60 years of age and met DSM-IV criteria for major depression underwent MRI and were enrolled in a 12-week treatment study. Exclusion criteria included cognitive impairment or severe medical disorders. The volumes or cortical thicknesses of regions of interest that differed between the depressed group and a comparison group (N=50) were determined. These regions of interest were used in analyses of the depressed group to predict antidepressant treatment outcome. Mixed-model analyses adjusting for age, education, age at depression onset, race, baseline MADRS score, scanner, and interaction with time examined predictors of MADRS scores over time.
RESULTS - Smaller hippocampal volumes predicted a slower response to treatment. With the inclusion of white matter hyper-intensity severity and neuropsychological factor scores, the best model included hippocampal volume and cognitive processing speed to predict rate of response over time. A secondary analysis showed that hippocampal volume and frontal pole thickness differed between patients who achieved remission and those who did not.
CONCLUSIONS - These data expand our understanding of the prediction of treatment course in late-life depression. The authors propose that the primary variables of hippocampal volume and cognitive processing speed, subsuming other contributing variables (episodic memory, executive function, language processing) predict antidepressant response.
0 Communities
1 Members
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26 MeSH Terms
Response variability of frontal eye field neurons modulates with sensory input and saccade preparation but not visual search salience.
Purcell BA, Heitz RP, Cohen JY, Schall JD
(2012) J Neurophysiol 108: 2737-50
MeSH Terms: Action Potentials, Analysis of Variance, Animals, Attention, Frontal Lobe, Macaca, Memory, Neurons, Photic Stimulation, Saccades, Task Performance and Analysis, Visual Acuity, Visual Fields
Show Abstract · Added February 12, 2015
Discharge rate modulation of frontal eye field (FEF) neurons has been identified with a representation of visual search salience (physical conspicuity and behavioral relevance) and saccade preparation. We tested whether salience or saccade preparation are evident in the trial-to-trial variability of discharge rate. We quantified response variability via the Fano factor in FEF neurons recorded in monkeys performing efficient and inefficient visual search tasks. Response variability declined following stimulus presentation in most neurons, but despite clear discharge rate modulation, variability did not change with target salience. Instead, we found that response variability was modulated by stimulus luminance and the number of items in the visual field independently of attentional demands. Response variability declined to a minimum before saccade initiation, and presaccadic response variability was directionally tuned. In addition, response variability was correlated with the response time of memory-guided saccades. These results indicate that the trial-by-trial response variability of FEF neurons reflects saccade preparation and the strength of sensory input, but not visual search salience or attentional allocation.
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1 Members
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13 MeSH Terms
Genome-wide association study of obsessive-compulsive disorder.
Stewart SE, Yu D, Scharf JM, Neale BM, Fagerness JA, Mathews CA, Arnold PD, Evans PD, Gamazon ER, Davis LK, Osiecki L, McGrath L, Haddad S, Crane J, Hezel D, Illman C, Mayerfeld C, Konkashbaev A, Liu C, Pluzhnikov A, Tikhomirov A, Edlund CK, Rauch SL, Moessner R, Falkai P, Maier W, Ruhrmann S, Grabe HJ, Lennertz L, Wagner M, Bellodi L, Cavallini MC, Richter MA, Cook EH, Kennedy JL, Rosenberg D, Stein DJ, Hemmings SM, Lochner C, Azzam A, Chavira DA, Fournier E, Garrido H, Sheppard B, Umaña P, Murphy DL, Wendland JR, Veenstra-VanderWeele J, Denys D, Blom R, Deforce D, Van Nieuwerburgh F, Westenberg HG, Walitza S, Egberts K, Renner T, Miguel EC, Cappi C, Hounie AG, Conceição do Rosário M, Sampaio AS, Vallada H, Nicolini H, Lanzagorta N, Camarena B, Delorme R, Leboyer M, Pato CN, Pato MT, Voyiaziakis E, Heutink P, Cath DC, Posthuma D, Smit JH, Samuels J, Bienvenu OJ, Cullen B, Fyer AJ, Grados MA, Greenberg BD, McCracken JT, Riddle MA, Wang Y, Coric V, Leckman JF, Bloch M, Pittenger C, Eapen V, Black DW, Ophoff RA, Strengman E, Cusi D, Turiel M, Frau F, Macciardi F, Gibbs JR, Cookson MR, Singleton A, North American Brain Expression Consortium, Hardy J, UK Brain Expression Database, Crenshaw AT, Parkin MA, Mirel DB, Conti DV, Purcell S, Nestadt G, Hanna GL, Jenike MA, Knowles JA, Cox N, Pauls DL
(2013) Mol Psychiatry 18: 788-98
MeSH Terms: Case-Control Studies, European Continental Ancestry Group, Frontal Lobe, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Genome-Wide Association Study, Humans, Nerve Tissue Proteins, Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, Parents, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Quantitative Trait Loci, SAP90-PSD95 Associated Proteins
Show Abstract · Added February 22, 2016
Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a common, debilitating neuropsychiatric illness with complex genetic etiology. The International OCD Foundation Genetics Collaborative (IOCDF-GC) is a multi-national collaboration established to discover the genetic variation predisposing to OCD. A set of individuals affected with DSM-IV OCD, a subset of their parents, and unselected controls, were genotyped with several different Illumina SNP microarrays. After extensive data cleaning, 1465 cases, 5557 ancestry-matched controls and 400 complete trios remained, with a common set of 469,410 autosomal and 9657 X-chromosome single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Ancestry-stratified case-control association analyses were conducted for three genetically-defined subpopulations and combined in two meta-analyses, with and without the trio-based analysis. In the case-control analysis, the lowest two P-values were located within DLGAP1 (P=2.49 × 10(-6) and P=3.44 × 10(-6)), a member of the neuronal postsynaptic density complex. In the trio analysis, rs6131295, near BTBD3, exceeded the genome-wide significance threshold with a P-value=3.84 × 10(-8). However, when trios were meta-analyzed with the case-control samples, the P-value for this variant was 3.62 × 10(-5), losing genome-wide significance. Although no SNPs were identified to be associated with OCD at a genome-wide significant level in the combined trio-case-control sample, a significant enrichment of methylation QTLs (P<0.001) and frontal lobe expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) (P=0.001) was observed within the top-ranked SNPs (P<0.01) from the trio-case-control analysis, suggesting these top signals may have a broad role in gene expression in the brain, and possibly in the etiology of OCD.
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12 MeSH Terms