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Statin Exposure Is Not Associated with Reduced Prevalence of Colorectal Neoplasia in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease.
Shah SC, Glass J, Giustino G, Hove JRT, Castaneda D, Torres J, Kumar A, Elman J, Ullman TA, Itzkowitz SH
(2019) Gut Liver 13: 54-61
MeSH Terms: Adult, Cholangitis, Sclerosing, Cohort Studies, Colitis, Colonoscopy, Colorectal Neoplasms, Early Detection of Cancer, Female, Humans, Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors, Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, Male, Middle Aged, Population Surveillance, Prevalence, Risk Factors, Time Factors
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
Background/Aims - Statins have been postulated to lower the risk of colorectal neoplasia. No studies have examined any possible chemopreventive effect of statins in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) undergoing colorectal cancer (CRC) surveillance. This study examined the association of statin exposure with dysplasia and CRC in patients with IBD undergoing dysplasia surveillance colonoscopies.
Methods - A cohort of patients with IBD undergoing colonoscopic surveillance for dysplasia and CRC at a single academic medical center were studied. The inclusion criteria were IBD involving the colon for ≥8 years (or any colitis duration if associated with primary sclerosing cholangitis [PSC]) and at least two colonoscopic surveillance exams. The exclusion criteria were CRC or high-grade dysplasia (HGD) prior to or at enrollment, prior colectomy, or limited (<30%) colonic disease. The primary outcome was the frequency of dysplasia and/or CRC in statin-exposed versus nonexposed patients.
Results - A total of 642 patients met the inclusion criteria (57 statin-exposed and 585 nonexposed). The statin-exposed group had a longer IBD duration, longer follow-up period, and more colonoscopies but lower inflammatory scores, less frequent PSC and less use of thiopurines and biologics. There were no differences in low-grade dysplasia, HGD, or CRC development during the follow-up period between the statin-exposed and nonexposed groups (21.1%, 5.3%, 1.8% vs 19.2%, 2.9%, 2.9%, respectively). Propensity score analysis did not alter the overall findings.
Conclusions - In IBD patients undergoing surveillance colonoscopies, statin use was not associated with reduced dysplasia or CRC rates. The role of statins as chemopreventive agents in IBD remains controversial.
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Serologic Response to Helicobacter pylori Proteins Associated With Risk of Colorectal Cancer Among Diverse Populations in the United States.
Butt J, Varga MG, Blot WJ, Teras L, Visvanathan K, Le Marchand L, Haiman C, Chen Y, Bao Y, Sesso HD, Wassertheil-Smoller S, Ho GYF, Tinker LE, Peek RM, Potter JD, Cover TL, Hendrix LH, Huang LC, Hyslop T, Um C, Grodstein F, Song M, Zeleniuch-Jacquotte A, Berndt S, Hildesheim A, Waterboer T, Pawlita M, Epplein M
(2019) Gastroenterology 156: 175-186.e2
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Antibodies, Bacterial, Bacterial Proteins, Biomarkers, Case-Control Studies, Colorectal Neoplasms, Female, Helicobacter Infections, Helicobacter pylori, Host-Pathogen Interactions, Humans, Incidence, Male, Middle Aged, Prospective Studies, Risk Factors, Seroepidemiologic Studies, United States, Virulence, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added February 7, 2019
BACKGROUND & AIMS - Previous studies reported an association of the bacteria Helicobacter pylori, the primary cause of gastric cancer, and risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). However, these findings have been inconsistent, appear to vary with population characteristics, and may be specific for virulence factor VacA. To more thoroughly evaluate the potential association of H pylori antibodies with CRC risk, we assembled a large consortium of cohorts representing diverse populations in the United States.
METHODS - We used H pylori multiplex serologic assays to analyze serum samples from 4063 incident cases of CRC, collected before diagnosis, and 4063 matched individuals without CRC (controls) from 10 prospective cohorts for antibody responses to 13 H pylori proteins, including virulence factors VacA and CagA. The association of seropositivity to H pylori proteins, as well as protein-specific antibody level, with odds of CRC was determined by conditional logistic regression.
RESULTS - Overall, 40% of controls and 41% of cases were H pylori-seropositive (odds ratio [OR], 1.09; 95% CI, 0.99-1.20). H pylori VacA-specific seropositivity was associated with an 11% increased odds of CRC (OR, 1.11; 95% CI, 1.01-1.22), and this association was particularly strong among African Americans (OR, 1.45; 95% CI, 1.08-1.95). Additionally, odds of CRC increased with level of VacA antibody in the overall cohort (P = .008) and specifically among African Americans (P = .007).
CONCLUSIONS - In an analysis of a large consortium of cohorts representing diverse populations, we found serologic responses to H pylori VacA to associate with increased risk of CRC risk, particularly for African Americans. Future studies should seek to understand whether this marker is related to virulent H pylori strains carried in these populations.
Copyright © 2019 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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Associations among histological characteristics and patient outcomes in colorectal carcinoma with a mucinous component.
Gonzalez RS, Cates JMM, Washington K
(2019) Histopathology 74: 406-414
MeSH Terms: Adenocarcinoma, Mucinous, Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Child, Colorectal Neoplasms, Female, Humans, Kaplan-Meier Estimate, Male, Middle Aged, Proportional Hazards Models, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added November 1, 2018
AIMS - Colorectal carcinoma (CRC) often has a mucinous component, with more than 50% mucin by volume defining the mucinous subtype of CRC. The prognostic impact of the mucinous phenotype remains unclear.
METHODS AND RESULTS - We evaluated 224 CRC with at least 5% mucinous component (herein 'mCRC') for patient sex, age, race and outcome; tumour size, location, stage and microsatellite instability (MSI) status; percentage of glands producing mucin; percentage of tumour volume composed of mucin; whether tumoral epithelium floated in mucin pools; tumour budding; signet ring cells (SRCs); and peritumoural inflammation (PI). We related these features to disease-specific survival and compared outcomes to 499 stage-matched, conventional colorectal adenocarcinomas. Factors predicting worse prognosis in mCRC on univariable analysis included non-MSI-high status (P = 0.0008), SRC (P = 0.0017) and lack of PI (P = 0.0034). No parameters were independently associated with outcome after adjusting for tumour stage in multivariate analysis. The percentage of glands producing mucin and percentage tumour volume composed of mucin did not affect prognosis, including at the recommended 50% cut-off for subtyping mCRC. Disease-specific survival for mCRC and adenocarcinomas were similar after accounting for stage.
CONCLUSIONS - Stage-matched mCRCs and adenocarcinomas have similar outcomes, with no prognostic significance to morphological subtyping. Histological characteristics of mCRC, including percentage of tumour volume comprised of mucin, were not predictive of outcome.
© 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
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14 MeSH Terms
Epithelial Smad4 Deletion Up-Regulates Inflammation and Promotes Inflammation-Associated Cancer.
Means AL, Freeman TJ, Zhu J, Woodbury LG, Marincola-Smith P, Wu C, Meyer AR, Weaver CJ, Padmanabhan C, An H, Zi J, Wessinger BC, Chaturvedi R, Brown TD, Deane NG, Coffey RJ, Wilson KT, Smith JJ, Sawyers CL, Goldenring JR, Novitskiy SV, Washington MK, Shi C, Beauchamp RD
(2018) Cell Mol Gastroenterol Hepatol 6: 257-276
MeSH Terms: Animals, Bone Morphogenetic Protein 2, Carcinoma, Cell Line, Cell Line, Tumor, Colitis, Colorectal Neoplasms, Dextran Sulfate, Humans, Inflammation, Intestinal Mucosa, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Transgenic, Smad4 Protein, Transforming Growth Factor beta1
Show Abstract · Added September 12, 2018
Background & Aims - Chronic inflammation is a predisposing condition for colorectal cancer. Many studies to date have focused on proinflammatory signaling pathways in the colon. Understanding the mechanisms that suppress inflammation, particularly in epithelial cells, is critical for developing therapeutic interventions. Here, we explored the roles of transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) family signaling through SMAD4 in colonic epithelial cells.
Methods - The gene was deleted specifically in adult murine intestinal epithelium. Colitis was induced by 3 rounds of dextran sodium sulfate in drinking water, after which mice were observed for up to 3 months. Nontransformed mouse colonocyte cell lines and colonoid cultures and human colorectal cancer cell lines were analyzed for responses to TGFβ1 and bone morphogenetic protein 2.
Results - Dextran sodium sulfate treatment was sufficient to drive carcinogenesis in mice lacking colonic expression, with resulting tumors bearing striking resemblance to human colitis-associated carcinoma. Loss of SMAD4 protein was observed in 48% of human colitis-associated carcinoma samples as compared with 19% of sporadic colorectal carcinomas. Loss of increased the expression of inflammatory mediators within nontransformed mouse colon epithelial cells in vivo. In vitro analysis of mouse and human colonic epithelial cell lines and organoids indicated that much of this regulation was cell autonomous. Furthermore, TGFβ signaling inhibited the epithelial inflammatory response to proinflammatory cytokines.
Conclusions - TGFβ suppresses the expression of proinflammatory genes in the colon epithelium, and loss of its downstream mediator, SMAD4, is sufficient to initiate inflammation-driven colon cancer. Transcript profiling: GSE100082.
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16 MeSH Terms
Antibody Responses to Subspecies Proteins in a Large Prospective Colorectal Cancer Cohort Consortium.
Butt J, Blot WJ, Teras LR, Visvanathan K, Le Marchand L, Haiman CA, Chen Y, Bao Y, Sesso HD, Wassertheil-Smoller S, Ho GY, Tinker LF, Peek RM, Potter JD, Cover TL, Hendrix LH, Huang LC, Waterboer T, Pawlita M, Epplein M
(2018) Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 27: 1186-1194
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Antibodies, Bacterial, Antibody Formation, Bacterial Proteins, Case-Control Studies, Colorectal Neoplasms, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Prognosis, Prospective Studies, Streptococcal Infections, Streptococcus gallolyticus subspecies gallolyticus, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added July 29, 2018
Antibody responses to subspecies (SGG) proteins, especially pilus protein Gallo2178, have been consistently associated with colorectal cancer risk. Previous case-control studies and prospective studies with up to 8 years of follow-up, however, were unable to decipher the temporality of antibody responses to SGG in the context of the long-term multistep development of colorectal cancer. In this study, we analyzed a large U.S. colorectal cancer cohort consortium with follow-up beyond 10 years for antibody responses to SGG. We applied multiplex serology to measure antibody responses to 9 SGG proteins in participants of 10 prospective U.S. cohorts (CLUE, CPSII, HPFS, MEC, NHS, NYUWHS, PHS, PLCO, SCCS, and WHI) including 4,063 incident colorectal cancer cases and 4,063 matched controls. Conditional logistic regression was used to assess whether antibody responses to SGG were associated with colorectal cancer risk, overall and by time between blood draw and diagnosis. Colorectal cancer risk was increased among those with antibody responses to Gallo2178, albeit not statistically significant [OR, 1.23; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.99-1.52]. This association was stronger for cases diagnosed <10 years after blood draw (OR, 1.40; 95% CI, 1.09-1.79), but was not found among cases diagnosed ≥10 years after blood draw (OR, 0.79; 95% CI, 0.50-1.24). In a large cohort consortium, we reproduced the association of antibody responses to SGG Gallo2178 with colorectal cancer risk for individuals diagnosed within 10 years after blood draw. This timing-specific finding suggests that antibody responses to SGG are associated with increased colorectal cancer risk only after tumorigenesis has begun. .
©2018 American Association for Cancer Research.
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19 MeSH Terms
Genetic Risk Score Is Associated With Prevalence of Advanced Neoplasms in a Colorectal Cancer Screening Population.
Weigl K, Thomsen H, Balavarca Y, Hellwege JN, Shrubsole MJ, Brenner H
(2018) Gastroenterology 155: 88-98.e10
MeSH Terms: Adenoma, Aged, Carcinoma, Colonoscopy, Colorectal Neoplasms, Early Detection of Cancer, Female, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Germany, Humans, Logistic Models, Male, Middle Aged, Neoplasm Staging, Odds Ratio, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Prevalence, Risk Assessment, Tennessee
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
BACKGROUND & AIMS - The presence of specific single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) can be used to calculate an individual's risk for colorectal cancer (CRC), called a genetic risk score (GRS). We investigated whether GRS can identify individuals with clinically relevant neoplasms in a screening colonoscopy population.
METHODS - We derived a GRS based on 48 SNPs associated with CRC, identified in a comprehensive literature search. We obtained genetic data from 1043 participants (50-79 years old) in a screening colonoscopy study in Germany, recruited from 2005 through 2013 (294 with advanced neoplasms, 249 with non-advanced adenoma (NAAs), and 500 without neoplasms). Each participant was assigned a GRS by aggregating their risk alleles (0, 1, or 2). Risk of advanced neoplasms and NAA according to GRS was calculated by multiple logistic regression. Risk advancement periods were calculated. We replicated our findings using data from a subset of the Tennessee Colorectal Polyp Study.
RESULTS - An increased GRS was associated with higher prevalence of advanced neoplasms, but not NAAs. Participants in the middle and upper tertiles of GRS had a 2.2-fold and 2.7-fold increase in risk, respectively, of advanced neoplasms compared to those in the lower tertile. Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) were 1.09 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.76-1.57) for NAA in the middle tertile and 1.05 (95% CI, 0.70-1.55) for NAA in the upper tertile. The ORs were largest for proximal advanced neoplasms for participants in the middle tertile (OR, 3.55; 95% CI 1.85-6.82) and the upper tertile (OR, 3.61; 95% CI 1.84-7.10). The risk advancement period for medium vs low GRS was 13.4 years (95% CI 4.8-22.0) and for high vs low GRS was 17.5 years (95% CI, 7.8-27.3).
CONCLUSIONS - In a genetic analysis of participants in a CRC screening study in Germany, an increased GRS (based on CRC-associated SNPs) was associated with increased prevalence of advanced neoplasms. These findings might be used in defining risk-adapted screening ages.
Copyright © 2018 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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Prospective study of blood metabolites associated with colorectal cancer risk.
Shu X, Xiang YB, Rothman N, Yu D, Li HL, Yang G, Cai H, Ma X, Lan Q, Gao YT, Jia W, Shu XO, Zheng W
(2018) Int J Cancer 143: 527-534
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Case-Control Studies, Chromatography, Gas, Colorectal Neoplasms, Female, Humans, Male, Metabolome, Metabolomics, Middle Aged, Odds Ratio, Population Surveillance, Risk Assessment, Risk Factors, Spectrometry, Mass, Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2018
Few prospective studies, and none in Asians, have systematically evaluated the relationship between blood metabolites and colorectal cancer risk. We conducted a nested case-control study to search for risk-associated metabolite biomarkers for colorectal cancer in an Asian population using blood samples collected prior to cancer diagnosis. Conditional logistic regression was performed to assess associations of metabolites with cancer risk. In this study, we included 250 incident cases with colorectal cancer and individually matched controls nested within two prospective Shanghai cohorts. We found 35 metabolites associated with risk of colorectal cancer after adjusting for multiple comparisons. Among them, 12 metabolites were glycerophospholipids including nine associated with reduced risk of colorectal cancer and three with increased risk [odds ratios per standard deviation increase of transformed metabolites: 0.31-1.98; p values: 0.002-1.25 × 10 ]. The other 23 metabolites associated with colorectal cancer risk included nine lipids other than glycerophospholipid, seven aromatic compounds, five organic acids and four other organic compounds. After mutual adjustment, nine metabolites remained statistically significant for colorectal cancer. Together, these independently associated metabolites can separate cancer cases from controls with an area under the curve of 0.76 for colorectal cancer. We have identified that dysregulation of glycerophospholipids may contribute to risk of colorectal cancer.
© 2018 UICC.
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Deciphering Elevated Microsatellite Alterations at Selected Tetra/Pentanucleotide Repeats, Microsatellite Instability, and Loss of Heterozygosity in Colorectal Cancers.
Wang Y, Vnencak-Jones CL, Cates JM, Shi C
(2018) J Mol Diagn 20: 366-372
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Colorectal Neoplasms, Female, Humans, Loss of Heterozygosity, Male, Microsatellite Instability, Microsatellite Repeats, Middle Aged
Show Abstract · Added November 1, 2018
Elevated microsatellite alterations at selected tetranucleotide repeats (EMAST) are common in colorectal cancers (CRCs). The association between EMAST and classic mono/dinucleotide microsatellite instability (MSI) is unknown. We assessed the stability of 13 tetranucleotide and three pentanucleotide repeat markers in tumor and normal tissue from 22 MSI-high and 107 microsatellite-stable CRC samples. When present, instability was observed at tetra/pentanucleotide repeats and was defined as elevated microsatellite alterations at selected tetra/pentanucleotide repeats-high (EMASTP-H; ≥30% instability), -low (EMASTP-L; <30% instability), or -stable (EMASTP-S). EMASTP instability, including high and low, was observed in 50 of 123 CRCs (41%), including all MSI-high tumors and 28 of 101 microsatellite-stable tumors (28%). MSI-high CRCs were more likely to be EMASTP-H compared with microsatellite-stable tumors with EMASTP instability. Tetranucleotide markers VWA and D13S317 were the two most frequently altered loci. Loss of heterozygosity was more common in EMASTP-L/S than in EMASTP-H CRCs. Frequencies of loss of heterozygosity at three loci were different between EMASTP-L and EMASTP-S tumors. In addition, right-sided tumor site, large tumor size, high tumor grade, and the presence of Crohn-like reaction were significantly associated with EMASTP-H CRCs. However, there were no differences in clinicopathologic features between EMASTP-L and EMASTP-S tumors. In summary, more CRCs exhibited genomic instability as EMASTP than as MSI. EMASTP instability may prove to be an important prognostic/therapeutic indicator in CRCs.
Copyright © 2018 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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Bacteroides fragilis Toxin Coordinates a Pro-carcinogenic Inflammatory Cascade via Targeting of Colonic Epithelial Cells.
Chung L, Thiele Orberg E, Geis AL, Chan JL, Fu K, DeStefano Shields CE, Dejea CM, Fathi P, Chen J, Finard BB, Tam AJ, McAllister F, Fan H, Wu X, Ganguly S, Lebid A, Metz P, Van Meerbeke SW, Huso DL, Wick EC, Pardoll DM, Wan F, Wu S, Sears CL, Housseau F
(2018) Cell Host Microbe 23: 203-214.e5
MeSH Terms: Adenomatous Polyposis Coli Protein, Animals, Bacterial Toxins, Bacteroides fragilis, Carcinogenesis, Cell Line, Tumor, Colon, Colorectal Neoplasms, Enzyme Activation, Epithelial Cells, Female, Gene Deletion, HT29 Cells, Humans, Inflammation, Interleukin-17, Male, Metalloendopeptidases, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Myeloid Cells, Receptors, Interleukin-17, Receptors, Interleukin-8B, STAT3 Transcription Factor, Transcription Factor RelA
Show Abstract · Added March 20, 2018
Pro-carcinogenic bacteria have the potential to initiate and/or promote colon cancer, in part via immune mechanisms that are incompletely understood. Using Apc mice colonized with the human pathobiont enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (ETBF) as a model of microbe-induced colon tumorigenesis, we show that the Bacteroides fragilis toxin (BFT) triggers a pro-carcinogenic, multi-step inflammatory cascade requiring IL-17R, NF-κB, and Stat3 signaling in colonic epithelial cells (CECs). Although necessary, Stat3 activation in CECs is not sufficient to trigger ETBF colon tumorigenesis. Notably, IL-17-dependent NF-κB activation in CECs induces a proximal to distal mucosal gradient of C-X-C chemokines, including CXCL1, that mediates the recruitment of CXCR2-expressing polymorphonuclear immature myeloid cells with parallel onset of ETBF-mediated distal colon tumorigenesis. Thus, BFT induces a pro-carcinogenic signaling relay from the CEC to a mucosal Th17 response that results in selective NF-κB activation in distal colon CECs, which collectively triggers myeloid-cell-dependent distal colon tumorigenesis.
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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High Risk of Advanced Colorectal Neoplasia in Patients With Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis Associated With Inflammatory Bowel Disease.
Shah SC, Ten Hove JR, Castaneda D, Palmela C, Mooiweer E, Colombel JF, Harpaz N, Ullman TA, van Bodegraven AA, Jansen JM, Mahmmod N, van der Meulen-de Jong AE, Ponsioen CY, van der Woude CJ, Oldenburg B, Itzkowitz SH, Torres J
(2018) Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol 16: 1106-1113.e3
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Cholangitis, Sclerosing, Colonoscopy, Colorectal Neoplasms, Female, Histocytochemistry, Humans, Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, Longitudinal Studies, Male, Middle Aged, Netherlands, Retrospective Studies, Risk Assessment, United States, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
BACKGROUND & AIMS - Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC, termed PSC-IBD) are at increased risk for colorectal cancer, but their risk following a diagnosis of low-grade dysplasia (LGD) is not well described. We aimed to determine the rate of advanced colorectal neoplasia (aCRN), defined as high-grade dysplasia and/or colorectal cancer, following a diagnosis of indefinite dysplasia or LGD in this population.
METHODS - We performed a retrospective, longitudinal study of 1911 patients with colonic IBD (293 with PSC and 1618 without PSC) who underwent more than 2 surveillance colonoscopies from 2000 through 2015 in The Netherlands or the United States (9265 patient-years of follow-up evaluation). We collected data on clinical and demographic features of patients, as well as data from each surveillance colonoscopy and histologic report. For each surveillance colonoscopy, the severity of active inflammation was documented. The primary outcome was a diagnosis of aCRN during follow-up evaluation. We also investigated factors associated with aCRN in patients with or without a prior diagnosis of indefinite dysplasia or LGD.
RESULTS - Patients with PSC-IBD had a 2-fold higher risk of developing aCRN than patients with non-PSC IBD. Mean inflammation scores did not differ significantly between patients with PSC-IBD (0.55) vs patients with non-PSC IBD (0.56) (P = .89), nor did proportions of patients with LGD (21% of patients with PSC-IBD vs 18% of patients with non-PSC IBD) differ significantly (P = .37). However, the rate of aCRN following a diagnosis of LGD was significantly higher in patients with PSC-IBD (8.4 per 100 patient-years) than patients with non-PSC IBD (3.0 per 100 patient-years; P = .01). PSC (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR], 2.01; 95% CI, 1.09-3.71), increasing age (aHR 1.03; 95% CI, 1.01-1.05), and active inflammation (aHR, 2.39; 95% CI, 1.63-3.49) were independent risk factors for aCRN. Dysplasia was more often endoscopically invisible in patients with PSC-IBD than in patients with non-PSC IBD.
CONCLUSIONS - In a longitudinal study of almost 2000 patients with colonic IBD, PSC remained a strong independent risk factor for aCRN. Once LGD is detected, aCRN develops at a higher rate in patients with PSC and is more often endoscopically invisible than in patients with only IBD. Our findings support recommendations for careful annual colonoscopic surveillance for patients with IBD and PSC, and consideration of colectomy once LGD is detected.
Copyright © 2018 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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