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Hypertension and increased endothelial mechanical stretch promote monocyte differentiation and activation: roles of STAT3, interleukin 6 and hydrogen peroxide.
Loperena R, Van Beusecum JP, Itani HA, Engel N, Laroumanie F, Xiao L, Elijovich F, Laffer CL, Gnecco JS, Noonan J, Maffia P, Jasiewicz-Honkisz B, Czesnikiewicz-Guzik M, Mikolajczyk T, Sliwa T, Dikalov S, Weyand CM, Guzik TJ, Harrison DG
(2018) Cardiovasc Res 114: 1547-1563
MeSH Terms: Aged, Angiotensin II, Animals, Blood Pressure, Case-Control Studies, Cell Communication, Cell Differentiation, Cells, Cultured, Coculture Techniques, Disease Models, Animal, Endothelial Cells, Female, Humans, Hydrogen Peroxide, Hypertension, Interleukin-6, Male, Mechanotransduction, Cellular, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Middle Aged, Monocytes, Nitric Oxide, Phenotype, STAT3 Transcription Factor, Stress, Mechanical
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
Aims - Monocytes play an important role in hypertension. Circulating monocytes in humans exist as classical, intermediate, and non-classical forms. Monocyte differentiation can be influenced by the endothelium, which in turn is activated in hypertension by mechanical stretch. We sought to examine the role of increased endothelial stretch and hypertension on monocyte phenotype and function.
Methods and results - Human monocytes were cultured with confluent human aortic endothelial cells undergoing either 5% or 10% cyclical stretch. We also characterized circulating monocytes in normotensive and hypertensive humans. In addition, we quantified accumulation of activated monocytes and monocyte-derived cells in aortas and kidneys of mice with Angiotensin II-induced hypertension. Increased endothelial stretch enhanced monocyte conversion to CD14++CD16+ intermediate monocytes and monocytes bearing the CD209 marker and markedly stimulated monocyte mRNA expression of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1β, IL-23, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 4, and tumour necrosis factor α. STAT3 in monocytes was activated by increased endothelial stretch. Inhibition of STAT3, neutralization of IL-6 and scavenging of hydrogen peroxide prevented formation of intermediate monocytes in response to increased endothelial stretch. We also found evidence that nitric oxide (NO) inhibits formation of intermediate monocytes and STAT3 activation. In vivo studies demonstrated that humans with hypertension have increased intermediate and non-classical monocytes and that intermediate monocytes demonstrate evidence of STAT3 activation. Mice with experimental hypertension exhibit increased aortic and renal infiltration of monocytes, dendritic cells, and macrophages with activated STAT3.
Conclusions - These findings provide insight into how monocytes are activated by the vascular endothelium during hypertension. This is likely in part due to a loss of NO signalling and increased release of IL-6 and hydrogen peroxide by the dysfunctional endothelium and a parallel increase in STAT activation in adjacent monocytes. Interventions to enhance bioavailable NO, reduce IL-6 or hydrogen peroxide production or to inhibit STAT3 may have anti-inflammatory roles in hypertension and related conditions.
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25 MeSH Terms
Deletion of Macrophage Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor-Related Protein 1 (LRP1) Accelerates Atherosclerosis Regression and Increases C-C Chemokine Receptor Type 7 (CCR7) Expression in Plaque Macrophages.
Mueller PA, Zhu L, Tavori H, Huynh K, Giunzioni I, Stafford JM, Linton MF, Fazio S
(2018) Circulation 138: 1850-1863
MeSH Terms: Animals, Aorta, Aortic Diseases, Apoptosis, Atherosclerosis, Cells, Cultured, Cholesterol, Disease Models, Animal, Female, Gene Deletion, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Macrophages, Mice, Knockout, ApoE, Necrosis, Phenotype, Plaque, Atherosclerotic, Receptors, CCR7, Receptors, LDL, Signal Transduction, Tumor Suppressor Proteins, Up-Regulation
Show Abstract · Added July 20, 2018
BACKGROUND - We previously showed that mice lacking MΦLRP1 (low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 in macrophages) undergo accelerated atherosclerotic plaque formation due to changes in macrophages including increased apoptosis, decreased efferocytosis, and exaggerated transition to the inflammatory M1 phenotype. Here we sought to explore the role of macrophage low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 during regression of atherosclerosis since regressing plaques are characterized by transitioning of macrophages to M2 status as inflammation resolves.
METHODS - Apolipoprotein E mice on a high-fat diet for 12 weeks were reconstituted with bone marrow from apolipoprotein E-producing wild-type or MΦLRP1 mice, and then placed on a chow diet for 10 weeks (n=9 to 11 mice/group). A cohort of apolipoprotein E mice reconstituted with apolipoprotein E bone marrow served as baseline controls (n=9).
RESULTS - Plaques of both wild-type and MΦLRP1 bone marrow recipients regressed compared with controls (11% and 22%, respectively; P<0.05), and plaques of MΦLRP1 recipients were 13% smaller than those of wild-type recipients ( P<0.05). Recipients of MΦLRP1 marrow had 36% fewer M1 macrophages ( P<0.01) and 2.5-fold more CCR7 (C-C chemokine receptor type 7)-positive macrophages in the plaque relative to wild-type mice ( P<0.01). Additionally, in vivo studies of cellular egress showed a 4.6-fold increase in 5-ethynyl-2´-deoxyuridine-labeled CCR7 macrophages in mediastinal lymph nodes. Finally, in vivo studies of reverse cholesterol transport showed a 1.4-fold higher reverse cholesterol transport in MΦLRP1 recipient mice ( P<0.01).
CONCLUSIONS - Absence of macrophage low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 unexpectedly accelerates atherosclerosis regression, enhances reverse cholesterol transport, and increases expression of the motility receptor CCR7, which drives macrophage egress from lesions.
1 Communities
1 Members
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21 MeSH Terms
Bergmann glial Sonic hedgehog signaling activity is required for proper cerebellar cortical expansion and architecture.
Cheng FY, Fleming JT, Chiang C
(2018) Dev Biol 440: 152-166
MeSH Terms: Animals, Astrocytes, Cell Differentiation, Cell Division, Cell Proliferation, Cells, Cultured, Cerebellar Cortex, Cerebellar Neoplasms, Cerebellum, Developmental Disabilities, Hedgehog Proteins, Mice, Nervous System Malformations, Neural Stem Cells, Neuroglia, Neurons, Purkinje Cells, Signal Transduction, Wnt Signaling Pathway
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2019
Neuronal-glial relationships play a critical role in the maintenance of central nervous system architecture and neuronal specification. A deeper understanding of these relationships can elucidate cellular cross-talk capable of sustaining proper development of neural tissues. In the cerebellum, cerebellar granule neuron precursors (CGNPs) proliferate in response to Purkinje neuron-derived Sonic hedgehog (Shh) before ultimately exiting the cell cycle and migrating radially along Bergmann glial fibers. However, the function of Bergmann glia in CGNP proliferation remains not well defined. Interestingly, the Hh pathway is also activated in Bergmann glia, but the role of Shh signaling in these cells is unknown. In this study, we show that specific ablation of Shh signaling using the tamoxifen-inducible TNC line to eliminate Shh pathway activator Smoothened in Bergmann glia is sufficient to cause severe cerebellar hypoplasia and a significant reduction in CGNP proliferation. TNC; Smo (Smo) mice demonstrate an obvious reduction in cerebellar size within two days of ablation of Shh signaling. Mutant cerebella have severely reduced proliferation and increased differentiation of CGNPs due to a significant decrease in Shh activity and concomitant activation of Wnt signaling in Smo CGNPs, suggesting that this pathway is involved in cross-talk with the Shh pathway in regulating CGNP proliferation. In addition, Purkinje cells are ectopically located, their dendrites stunted, and the Bergmann glial network disorganized. Collectively, these data demonstrate a previously unappreciated role for Bergmann glial Shh signaling activity in the proliferation of CGNPs and proper maintenance of cerebellar architecture.
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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MeSH Terms
Regulation of Insulin Receptor Pathway and Glucose Metabolism by CD36 Signaling.
Samovski D, Dhule P, Pietka T, Jacome-Sosa M, Penrose E, Son NH, Flynn CR, Shoghi KI, Hyrc KL, Goldberg IJ, Gamazon ER, Abumrad NA
(2018) Diabetes 67: 1272-1284
MeSH Terms: Animals, CD36 Antigens, CHO Cells, Carbohydrate Metabolism, Cells, Cultured, Cricetinae, Cricetulus, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Female, Glucose, Humans, Insulin, Insulin Resistance, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Muscle, Skeletal, Receptor, Insulin, Signal Transduction
Show Abstract · Added May 26, 2018
During reduced energy intake, skeletal muscle maintains homeostasis by rapidly suppressing insulin-stimulated glucose utilization. Loss of this adaptation is observed with deficiency of the fatty acid transporter CD36. A similar loss is also characteristic of the insulin-resistant state where CD36 is dysfunctional. To elucidate what links CD36 to muscle glucose utilization, we examined whether CD36 signaling might influence insulin action. First, we show that CD36 deletion specific to skeletal muscle reduces expression of insulin signaling and glucose metabolism genes. It decreases muscle ceramides but impairs glucose disposal during a meal. Second, depletion of CD36 suppresses insulin signaling in primary-derived human myotubes, and the mechanism is shown to involve functional CD36 interaction with the insulin receptor (IR). CD36 promotes tyrosine phosphorylation of IR by the Fyn kinase and enhances IR recruitment of P85 and downstream signaling. Third, pretreatment for 15 min with saturated fatty acids suppresses CD36-Fyn enhancement of IR phosphorylation, whereas unsaturated fatty acids are neutral or stimulatory. These findings define mechanisms important for muscle glucose metabolism and optimal insulin responsiveness. Potential human relevance is suggested by genome-wide analysis and RNA sequencing data that associate genetically determined low muscle CD36 expression to incidence of type 2 diabetes.
© 2018 by the American Diabetes Association.
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2 Members
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20 MeSH Terms
Mistargeting of a truncated Na-K-2Cl cotransporter in epithelial cells.
Koumangoye R, Omer S, Delpire E
(2018) Am J Physiol Cell Physiol 315: C258-C276
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cell Membrane, Cells, Cultured, Colon, Cytoplasm, Dogs, Epithelial Cells, Female, Madin Darby Canine Kidney Cells, Male, Mice, Oocytes, Salivary Glands, Sodium-Potassium-Chloride Symporters, Sodium-Potassium-Exchanging ATPase, Solute Carrier Family 12, Member 2, Xenopus laevis
Show Abstract · Added May 4, 2018
We recently reported the case of a young patient with multisystem failure carrying a de novo mutation in SLC12A2, the gene encoding the Na-K-2Cl cotransporter-1 (NKCC1). Heterologous expression studies in nonepithelial cells failed to demonstrate dominant-negative effects. In this study, we examined expression of the mutant cotransporter in epithelial cells. Using Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells grown on glass coverslips, permeabilized support, and Matrigel, we show that the fluorescently tagged mutant cotransporter is expressed in cytoplasm and at the apical membrane and affects epithelium integrity. Expression of the mutant transporter at the apical membrane also results in the mislocalization of some of the wild-type transporter to the apical membrane. This mistargeting is specific to NKCC1 as the Na-K-ATPase remains localized on the basolateral membrane. To assess transporter localization in vivo, we created a mouse model using CRISPR/cas9 that reproduces the 11 bp deletion in exon 22 of Slc12a2. Although the mice do not display an overt phenotype, we show that the colon and salivary gland expresses wild-type NKCC1 abundantly at the apical pole, confirming the data obtained in cultured epithelial cells. Enough cotransporter must remain, however, on the basolateral membrane to participate in saliva secretion, as no significant decrease in saliva production was observed in the mutant mice.
1 Communities
1 Members
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17 MeSH Terms
Modification by isolevuglandins, highly reactive γ-ketoaldehydes, deleteriously alters high-density lipoprotein structure and function.
May-Zhang LS, Yermalitsky V, Huang J, Pleasent T, Borja MS, Oda MN, Jerome WG, Yancey PG, Linton MF, Davies SS
(2018) J Biol Chem 293: 9176-9187
MeSH Terms: Aldehydes, Animals, Apolipoprotein A-I, Apolipoprotein A-II, Cells, Cultured, Cholesterol, Female, Humans, Hyperlipoproteinemia Type II, Ketones, Lipid Metabolism, Lipids, Lipoproteins, HDL, Macrophages, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Phosphatidylethanolamines
Show Abstract · Added August 3, 2018
Cardiovascular disease risk depends on high-density lipoprotein (HDL) function, not HDL-cholesterol. Isolevuglandins (IsoLGs) are lipid dicarbonyls that react with lysine residues of proteins and phosphatidylethanolamine. IsoLG adducts are elevated in atherosclerosis. The consequences of IsoLG modification of HDL have not been studied. We hypothesized that IsoLG modification of apoA-I deleteriously alters HDL function. We determined the effect of IsoLG on HDL structure-function and whether pentylpyridoxamine (PPM), a dicarbonyl scavenger, can preserve HDL function. IsoLG adducts in HDL derived from patients with familial hypercholesterolemia ( = 10, 233.4 ± 158.3 ng/mg) were found to be significantly higher than in healthy controls ( = 7, 90.1 ± 33.4 pg/mg protein). Further, HDL exposed to myeloperoxidase had elevated IsoLG-lysine adducts (5.7 ng/mg protein) compared with unexposed HDL (0.5 ng/mg protein). Preincubation with PPM reduced IsoLG-lysine adducts by 67%, whereas its inactive analogue pentylpyridoxine did not. The addition of IsoLG produced apoA-I and apoA-II cross-links beginning at 0.3 molar eq of IsoLG/mol of apoA-I (0.3 eq), whereas succinylaldehyde and 4-hydroxynonenal required 10 and 30 eq. IsoLG increased HDL size, generating a subpopulation of 16-23 nm. 1 eq of IsoLG decreased HDL-mediated [H]cholesterol efflux from macrophages via ABCA1, which corresponded to a decrease in HDL-apoA-I exchange from 47.4% to only 24.8%. This suggests that IsoLG inhibits apoA-I from disassociating from HDL to interact with ABCA1. The addition of 0.3 eq of IsoLG ablated HDL's ability to inhibit LPS-stimulated cytokine expression by macrophages and increased IL-1β expression by 3.5-fold. The structural-functional effects were partially rescued with PPM scavenging.
© 2018 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.
1 Communities
3 Members
0 Resources
18 MeSH Terms
Structural and Functional Features of the Reovirus σ1 Tail.
Dietrich MH, Ogden KM, Long JM, Ebenhoch R, Thor A, Dermody TS, Stehle T
(2018) J Virol 92:
MeSH Terms: Amino Acid Sequence, Capsid Proteins, Cells, Cultured, Crystallography, X-Ray, Protein Binding, Protein Conformation, Receptors, Virus, Reoviridae, Reoviridae Infections, Sequence Homology, Virus Attachment, Virus Internalization, Virus Replication
Show Abstract · Added April 3, 2019
Mammalian orthoreovirus attachment to target cells is mediated by the outer capsid protein σ1, which projects from the virion surface. The σ1 protein is a homotrimer consisting of a filamentous tail, which is partly inserted into the virion; a body domain constructed from β-spiral repeats; and a globular head with receptor-binding properties. The σ1 tail is predicted to form an α-helical coiled coil. Although σ1 undergoes a conformational change during cell entry, the nature of this change and its contributions to viral replication are unknown. Electron micrographs of σ1 molecules released from virions identified three regions of flexibility, including one at the midpoint of the molecule, that may be involved in its structural rearrangement. To enable a detailed understanding of essential σ1 tail organization and properties, we determined high-resolution structures of the reovirus type 1 Lang (T1L) and type 3 Dearing (T3D) σ1 tail domains. Both molecules feature extended α-helical coiled coils, with T1L σ1 harboring central chloride ions. Each molecule displays a discontinuity (stutter) within the coiled coil and an unexpectedly seamless transition to the body domain. The transition region features conserved interdomain interactions and appears rigid rather than highly flexible. Functional analyses of reoviruses containing engineered σ1 mutations suggest that conserved residues predicted to stabilize the coiled-coil-to-body junction are essential for σ1 folding and encapsidation, whereas central chloride ion coordination and the stutter are dispensable for efficient replication. Together, these findings enable modeling of full-length reovirus σ1 and provide insight into the stabilization of a multidomain virus attachment protein. While it is established that different conformational states of attachment proteins of enveloped viruses mediate receptor binding and membrane fusion, less is understood about how such proteins mediate attachment and entry of nonenveloped viruses. The filamentous reovirus attachment protein σ1 binds cellular receptors; contains regions of predicted flexibility, including one at the fiber midpoint; and undergoes a conformational change during cell entry. Neither the nature of the structural change nor its contribution to viral infection is understood. We determined crystal structures of large σ1 fragments for two different reovirus serotypes. We observed an unexpectedly tight transition between two domains spanning the fiber midpoint, which allows for little flexibility. Studies of reoviruses with engineered changes near the σ1 midpoint suggest that the stabilization of this region is critical for function. Together with a previously determined structure, we now have a complete model of the full-length, elongated reovirus σ1 attachment protein.
Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.
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1 Members
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MeSH Terms
Successful Establishment of Primary Type II Alveolar Epithelium with 3D Organotypic Coculture.
Sucre JMS, Jetter CS, Loomans H, Williams J, Plosa EJ, Benjamin JT, Young LR, Kropski JA, Calvi CL, Kook S, Wang P, Gleaves L, Eskaros A, Goetzl L, Blackwell TS, Guttentag SH, Zijlstra A
(2018) Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol 59: 158-166
MeSH Terms: Cell Communication, Cells, Cultured, Coculture Techniques, Epithelial Cells, Fibroblasts, Humans, Lung, Lung Injury, Phenotype
Show Abstract · Added April 1, 2019
Alveolar type II (AT2) epithelial cells are uniquely specialized to produce surfactant in the lung and act as progenitor cells in the process of repair after lung injury. AT2 cell injury has been implicated in several lung diseases, including idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and bronchopulmonary dysplasia. The inability to maintain primary AT2 cells in culture has been a significant barrier in the investigation of pulmonary biology. We have addressed this knowledge gap by developing a three-dimensional (3D) organotypic coculture using primary human fetal AT2 cells and pulmonary fibroblasts. Grown on top of matrix-embedded fibroblasts, the primary human AT2 cells establish a monolayer and have direct contact with the underlying pulmonary fibroblasts. Unlike conventional two-dimensional (2D) culture, the structural and functional phenotype of the AT2 cells in our 3D organotypic culture was preserved over 7 days of culture, as evidenced by the presence of lamellar bodies and by production of surfactant proteins B and C. Importantly, the AT2 cells in 3D cocultures maintained the ability to replicate, with approximately 60% of AT2 cells staining positive for the proliferation marker Ki67, whereas no such proliferation is evident in 2D cultures of the same primary AT2 cells. This organotypic culture system enables interrogation of AT2 epithelial biology by providing a reductionist in vitro model in which to investigate the response of AT2 epithelial cells and AT2 cell-fibroblast interactions during lung injury and repair.
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2 Members
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9 MeSH Terms
Protective Role of mPGES-1 (Microsomal Prostaglandin E Synthase-1)-Derived PGE (Prostaglandin E) and the Endothelial EP4 (Prostaglandin E Receptor) in Vascular Responses to Injury.
Hao H, Hu S, Wan Q, Xu C, Chen H, Zhu L, Xu Z, Meng J, Breyer RM, Li N, Liu DP, FitzGerald GA, Wang M
(2018) Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol 38: 1115-1124
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cell Adhesion, Cell Proliferation, Cells, Cultured, Dinoprostone, Disease Models, Animal, Endothelial Cells, Female, Femoral Artery, Humans, Leukocytes, Male, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Muscle, Smooth, Neointima, Prostaglandin-E Synthases, Re-Epithelialization, Receptors, Epoprostenol, Receptors, Prostaglandin E, EP4 Subtype, Signal Transduction, Vascular System Injuries
Show Abstract · Added May 29, 2018
OBJECTIVE - Deletion of mPGES-1 (microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1)-an anti-inflammatory target alternative to COX (cyclooxygenase)-2-attenuates injury-induced neointima formation in mice. This is attributable to the augmented levels of PGI (prostacyclin)-a known restraint of the vascular response to injury, acting via IP (I prostanoid receptor). To examine the role of mPGES-1-derived PGE (prostaglandin E) in vascular remodeling without the IP.
APPROACH AND RESULTS - Mice deficient in both IP and mPGES-1 (DKO [double knockout] and littermate controls [IP KO (knockout)]) were subjected to angioplasty wire injury. Compared with the deletion of IP alone, coincident deletion of IP and mPGES-1 increased neointima formation, without affecting media area. Early pathological changes include impaired reendothelialization and increased leukocyte invasion in neointima. Endothelial cells (ECs), but not vascular smooth muscle cells, isolated from DKOs exhibited impaired cell proliferation. Activation of EP (E prostanoid receptor) 4 (and EP2, to a lesser extent), but not of EP1 or EP3, promoted EC proliferation. EP4 antagonism inhibited proliferation of mPGES-1-competent ECs, but not of mPGES-1-deficient ECs, which showed suppressed PGE production. EP4 activation inhibited leukocyte adhesion to ECs in vitro, promoted reendothelialization, and limited neointima formation post-injury in the mouse. Endothelium-restricted deletion of EP4 in mice suppressed reendothelialization, increased neointimal leukocytes, and exacerbated neointimal formation.
CONCLUSIONS - Removal of the IP receptors unmasks a protective role of mPGES-1-derived PGE in limiting injury-induced vascular hyperplasia. EP4, in the endothelial compartment, is essential to promote reendothelialization and restrain neointimal formation after injury. Activating EP4 bears therapeutic potential to prevent restenosis after percutaneous coronary intervention.
© 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.
1 Communities
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22 MeSH Terms
APC Inhibits Ligand-Independent Wnt Signaling by the Clathrin Endocytic Pathway.
Saito-Diaz K, Benchabane H, Tiwari A, Tian A, Li B, Thompson JJ, Hyde AS, Sawyer LM, Jodoin JN, Santos E, Lee LA, Coffey RJ, Beauchamp RD, Williams CS, Kenworthy AK, Robbins DJ, Ahmed Y, Lee E
(2018) Dev Cell 44: 566-581.e8
MeSH Terms: Adenomatous Polyposis Coli Protein, Animals, Cells, Cultured, Clathrin, Drosophila melanogaster, Endocytosis, Female, Humans, Infant, Ligands, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Middle Aged, Wnt Proteins, Wnt Signaling Pathway, beta Catenin
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) mutations cause Wnt pathway activation in human cancers. Current models for APC action emphasize its role in promoting β-catenin degradation downstream of Wnt receptors. Unexpectedly, we find that blocking Wnt receptor activity in APC-deficient cells inhibits Wnt signaling independently of Wnt ligand. We also show that inducible loss of APC is rapidly followed by Wnt receptor activation and increased β-catenin levels. In contrast, APC2 loss does not promote receptor activation. We show that APC exists in a complex with clathrin and that Wnt pathway activation in APC-deficient cells requires clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Finally, we demonstrate conservation of this mechanism in Drosophila intestinal stem cells. We propose a model in which APC and APC2 function to promote β-catenin degradation, and APC also acts as a molecular "gatekeeper" to block receptor activation via the clathrin pathway.
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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4 Members
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18 MeSH Terms