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Results: 11 to 20 of 133

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The Par3 polarity protein is an exocyst receptor essential for mammary cell survival.
Ahmed SM, Macara IG
(2017) Nat Commun 8: 14867
MeSH Terms: Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing, Animals, Apoptosis, Cadherins, Cell Adhesion Molecules, Cell Cycle Proteins, Cell Line, Cell Polarity, Cell Survival, Enzyme Activation, Epithelial Cells, Female, Gene Knockdown Techniques, Golgi Apparatus, Humans, Lysine, Mammary Glands, Animal, Models, Biological, PTEN Phosphohydrolase, Phosphatidylinositol Phosphates, Phosphorylation, Protein Domains, Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt, Vesicular Transport Proteins, rab GTP-Binding Proteins
Show Abstract · Added April 26, 2017
The exocyst is an essential component of the secretory pathway required for delivery of basolateral proteins to the plasma membranes of epithelial cells. Delivery occurs adjacent to tight junctions (TJ), suggesting that it recognizes a receptor at this location. However, no such receptor has been identified. The Par3 polarity protein associates with TJs but has no known function in membrane traffic. We now show that, unexpectedly, Par3 is essential for mammary cell survival. Par3 silencing causes apoptosis, triggered by phosphoinositide trisphosphate depletion and decreased Akt phosphorylation, resulting from failure of the exocyst to deliver basolateral proteins to the cortex. A small region of PAR3 binds directly to Exo70 and is sufficient for exocyst docking, membrane-protein delivery and cell survival. PAR3 lacking this domain can associate with the cortex but cannot support exocyst function. We conclude that Par3 is the long-sought exocyst receptor required for targeted membrane-protein delivery.
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25 MeSH Terms
Clustering of integrin α5 at the lateral membrane restores epithelial polarity in invasive colorectal cancer cells.
Starchenko A, Graves-Deal R, Yang YP, Li C, Zent R, Singh B, Coffey RJ
(2017) Mol Biol Cell 28: 1288-1300
MeSH Terms: Antibodies, Cadherins, Cell Adhesion, Cell Culture Techniques, Cell Line, Tumor, Cell Polarity, Colorectal Neoplasms, Epithelial Cells, Extracellular Matrix, Fibronectins, Humans, Integrin alpha5, Integrin alpha5beta1, Integrin beta1, Membrane Proteins, Membranes
Show Abstract · Added May 3, 2017
Apicobasolateral polarity is a fundamental property of epithelial cells, and its loss is a hallmark of cancer. Integrin-mediated contact with the extracellular matrix defines the basal surface, setting in motion E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell contact, which establishes apicobasolateral polarity. Role(s) for lateral integrins in this polarization process and the consequences of their disruption are incompletely understood. We show that addition of an integrin β1-activating monoclonal antibody, P4G11, to invasive colorectal cancer cells in three-dimensional type 1 collagen reverts the invasive phenotype and restores apicobasolateral polarity. P4G11 induces clustering of integrin α5β1 at lateral, intercellular surfaces. This leads to deposition and polymerization of fibronectin and recruitment of paxillin to sites of lateral integrin α5β1 clustering and is followed by tight junction formation, as determined by ZO-1 localization. Inducible elimination of integrin α5 abrogates the epithelial-organizing effects of P4G11. In addition, polymerization of fibronectin is required for the effects of P4G11, and addition of polymerized superfibronectin is sufficient to induce tight junction formation and apicobasolateral polarization. In the normal human colon, we show that integrin α5 localizes to the lateral membrane of terminally differentiated colonocytes and that integrin α5 staining may be reduced in colorectal cancer. Thus we propose a novel role for integrin α5β1 in regulating epithelial morphogenesis.
© 2017 Starchenko et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).
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16 MeSH Terms
Trafficking Ion Transporters to the Apical Membrane of Polarized Intestinal Enterocytes.
Engevik AC, Goldenring JR
(2018) Cold Spring Harb Perspect Biol 10:
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cell Membrane, Cell Polarity, Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator, Cytoskeletal Proteins, Enterocytes, Humans, Ion Transport, Malabsorption Syndromes, Membrane Transport Proteins, Microvilli, Mucolipidoses, Myosin Heavy Chains, Myosin Type V, Protein Transport, Sodium-Hydrogen Exchanger 3
Show Abstract · Added April 18, 2017
Epithelial cells lining the gastrointestinal tract require distinct apical and basolateral domains to function properly. Trafficking and insertion of enzymes and transporters into the apical brush border of intestinal epithelial cells is essential for effective digestion and absorption of nutrients. Specific critical ion transporters are delivered to the apical brush border to facilitate fluid and electrolyte uptake. Maintenance of these apical transporters requires both targeted delivery and regulated membrane recycling. Examination of altered apical trafficking in patients with Microvillus Inclusion disease caused by inactivating mutations in MYO5B has led to insights into the regulation of apical trafficking by elements of the apical recycling system. Modeling of MYO5B loss in cell culture and animal models has led to recognition of Rab11a and Rab8a as critical regulators of apical brush border function. All of these studies show the importance of apical membrane trafficking dynamics in maintenance of polarized epithelial cell function.
Copyright © 2018 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.
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16 MeSH Terms
Interaction of phosphorylated Rab11-FIP2 with Eps15 regulates apical junction composition.
Lapierre LA, Manning EH, Mitchell KM, Caldwell CM, Goldenring JR
(2017) Mol Biol Cell 28: 1088-1100
MeSH Terms: Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing, Animals, Cadherins, Carrier Proteins, Cell Polarity, Dogs, Endosomes, Epithelial Cells, Gene Knockout Techniques, HEK293 Cells, Humans, Intercellular Junctions, Madin Darby Canine Kidney Cells, Membrane Proteins, Occludin, Phosphorylation, Protein Binding, Protein Transport, rab GTP-Binding Proteins
Show Abstract · Added April 18, 2017
MARK2 regulates the establishment of polarity in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells in part through phosphorylation of serine 227 of Rab11-FIP2. We identified Eps15 as an interacting partner of phospho-S227-Rab11-FIP2 (pS227-FIP2). During recovery from low calcium, Eps15 localized to the lateral membrane before pS227-FIP2 arrival. Later in recovery, Eps15 and pS227-FIP2 colocalized at the lateral membrane. In MDCK cells expressing the pseudophosphorylated FIP2 mutant FIP2(S227E), during recovery from low calcium, Eps15 was trapped and never localized to the lateral membrane. Mutation of any of the three NPF domains within GFP-FIP2(S227E) rescued Eps15 localization at the lateral membrane and reestablished single-lumen cyst formation in GFP-FIP2(S227E)-expressing cells in three-dimensional (3D) culture. Whereas expression of GFP-FIP2(S227E) induced the loss of E-cadherin and occludin, mutation of any of the NPF domains of GFP-FIP2(S227E) reestablished both proteins at the apical junctions. Knockdown of Eps15 altered the spatial and temporal localization of pS227-FIP2 and also elicited formation of multiple lumens in MDCK 3D cysts. Thus an interaction of Eps15 and pS227-FIP2 at the appropriate time and location in polarizing cells is necessary for proper establishment of epithelial polarity.
© 2017 Lapierre et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).
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19 MeSH Terms
Mechanisms of polarity protein expression control.
Ahmed SM, Macara IG
(2016) Curr Opin Cell Biol 42: 38-45
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cell Polarity, Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition, Gene Expression Regulation, Humans, Proteins, Proteolysis, Viruses
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2018
Polarity is a universal feature of cells during division and often at other stages of the cell cycle or after post-mitotic differentiation. A conserved machinery, present in all animals, initiates and maintains polarity. Multi-cellular animals organize themselves with respect to the axes of symmetry of the organism through the process of planar cell polarity, but many tissues also express a cell-intrinsic form of polarity, for instance to segregate the apical and basolateral membranes of epithelial cells. Although the genes and proteins involved in apical-basal polarity have been known for many years, the regulation of their expression remains ill-defined. Maintenance of the correct expression levels is essential for normal cell lineage allocation, tissue morphogenesis and cell survival. Here we summarize what is known about the transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of polarity protein expression, and discuss areas that remain to be understood.
Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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MeSH Terms
TLR3 Agonist Poly-IC Induces IL-33 and Promotes Myelin Repair.
Natarajan C, Yao SY, Sriram S
(2016) PLoS One 11: e0152163
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cell Differentiation, Cell Nucleus, Cell Polarity, Cells, Cultured, Corpus Callosum, Enzyme Activation, Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins, Interleukin-33, Lysophosphatidylcholines, Macrophages, Models, Biological, Myelin Basic Protein, Myelin Sheath, Neuroglia, Oligodendroglia, Phenotype, Phosphorylation, Poly I-C, Rats, Sprague-Dawley, Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction, Recombinant Proteins, Stem Cells, Toll-Like Receptor 3, Transcription, Genetic, Up-Regulation, Wound Healing, p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases
Show Abstract · Added April 18, 2017
BACKGROUND - Impaired remyelination of demyelinated axons is a major cause of neurological disability. In inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS), although remyelination does happen, it is often incomplete, resulting in poor clinical recovery. Poly-IC a known TLR3 agonist and IL-33, a cytokine which is induced by poly-IC are known to influence recovery and promote repair in experimental models of CNS demyelination.
METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS - We examined the effect of addition of poly-IC and IL-33 on the differentiation and maturation of oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPC) cultured in vitro. Both Poly-IC and IL-33 induced transcription of myelin genes and the differentiation of OPC to mature myelin forming cells. Poly-IC induced IL-33 in OPC and addition of IL-33 to in vitro cultures, amplified further, IL-33 expression suggesting an autocrine regulation of IL-33. Poly-IC and IL-33 also induced phosphorylation of p38MAPK, a signaling molecule involved in myelination. Following the induction of gliotoxic injury with lysolecithin to the corpus callosum (CC), treatment of animals with poly-IC resulted in greater recruitment of OPC and increased staining for myelin in areas of demyelination. Also, poly-IC treated animals showed greater expression of IL-33 and higher expression of M2 phenotype macrophages in the CC.
CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE - Our studies suggest that poly-IC and IL-33 play a role in myelin repair by enhancing expression of myelin genes and are therefore attractive therapeutic agents for use as remyelinating agents in human demyelinating disease.
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28 MeSH Terms
Identification of p62/SQSTM1 as a component of non-canonical Wnt VANGL2-JNK signalling in breast cancer.
Puvirajesinghe TM, Bertucci F, Jain A, Scerbo P, Belotti E, Audebert S, Sebbagh M, Lopez M, Brech A, Finetti P, Charafe-Jauffret E, Chaffanet M, Castellano R, Restouin A, Marchetto S, Collette Y, Gonçalvès A, Macara I, Birnbaum D, Kodjabachian L, Johansen T, Borg JP
(2016) Nat Commun 7: 10318
MeSH Terms: Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing, Animals, Blotting, Western, Breast Neoplasms, Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast, Carcinoma, Lobular, Cell Line, Tumor, Cell Migration Assays, Cell Movement, Cell Polarity, Cell Proliferation, DNA Copy Number Variations, Embryo, Nonmammalian, Female, Humans, Immunoprecipitation, Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins, MAP Kinase Signaling System, Mass Spectrometry, Membrane Proteins, Mice, Microscopy, Electron, Middle Aged, Neoplasm Transplantation, Prognosis, Proportional Hazards Models, RNA, Messenger, Sequestosome-1 Protein, Wnt Signaling Pathway, Xenopus
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2018
The non-canonical Wnt/planar cell polarity (Wnt/PCP) pathway plays a crucial role in embryonic development. Recent work has linked defects of this pathway to breast cancer aggressiveness and proposed Wnt/PCP signalling as a therapeutic target. Here we show that the archetypal Wnt/PCP protein VANGL2 is overexpressed in basal breast cancers, associated with poor prognosis and implicated in tumour growth. We identify the scaffold p62/SQSTM1 protein as a novel VANGL2-binding partner and show its key role in an evolutionarily conserved VANGL2-p62/SQSTM1-JNK pathway. This proliferative signalling cascade is upregulated in breast cancer patients with shorter survival and can be inactivated in patient-derived xenograft cells by inhibition of the JNK pathway or by disruption of the VANGL2-p62/SQSTM1 interaction. VANGL2-JNK signalling is thus a potential target for breast cancer therapy.
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MeSH Terms
Vinculin controls talin engagement with the actomyosin machinery.
Atherton P, Stutchbury B, Wang DY, Jethwa D, Tsang R, Meiler-Rodriguez E, Wang P, Bate N, Zent R, Barsukov IL, Goult BT, Critchley DR, Ballestrem C
(2015) Nat Commun 6: 10038
MeSH Terms: Actin Cytoskeleton, Actins, Actomyosin, Animals, Cell Polarity, Focal Adhesions, Mice, NIH 3T3 Cells, Protein Binding, Protein Structure, Tertiary, Talin, Vinculin
Show Abstract · Added February 4, 2016
The link between extracellular-matrix-bound integrins and intracellular F-actin is essential for cell spreading and migration. Here, we demonstrate how the actin-binding proteins talin and vinculin cooperate to provide this link. By expressing structure-based talin mutants in talin null cells, we show that while the C-terminal actin-binding site (ABS3) in talin is required for adhesion complex assembly, the central ABS2 is essential for focal adhesion (FA) maturation. Thus, although ABS2 mutants support cell spreading, the cells lack FAs, fail to polarize and exert reduced force on the surrounding matrix. ABS2 is inhibited by the preceding mechanosensitive vinculin-binding R3 domain, and deletion of R2R3 or expression of constitutively active vinculin generates stable force-independent FAs, although cell polarity is compromised. Our data suggest a model whereby force acting on integrin-talin complexes via ABS3 promotes R3 unfolding and vinculin binding, activating ABS2 and locking talin into an actin-binding configuration that stabilizes FAs.
1 Communities
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12 MeSH Terms
p120-catenin controls contractility along the vertical axis of epithelial lateral membranes.
Yu HH, Dohn MR, Markham NO, Coffey RJ, Reynolds AB
(2016) J Cell Sci 129: 80-94
MeSH Terms: Amino Acid Sequence, Animals, Cadherins, Catenins, Cell Membrane, Cell Polarity, Cell Shape, Dogs, Epithelial Cells, Madin Darby Canine Kidney Cells, Molecular Sequence Data, Nonmuscle Myosin Type IIA, Phenotype, Protein Binding, rho-Associated Kinases, rhoA GTP-Binding Protein
Show Abstract · Added May 2, 2016
In vertebrate epithelia, p120-catenin (hereafter referred to as p120; also known as CTNND1) mediates E-cadherin stability and suppression of RhoA. Genetic ablation of p120 in various epithelial tissues typically causes striking alterations in tissue function and morphology. Although these effects could very well involve p120's activity towards Rho, ascertaining the impact of this relationship has been complicated by the fact that p120 is also required for cell-cell adhesion. Here, we have molecularly uncoupled p120's cadherin-stabilizing and RhoA-suppressing activites. Unexpectedly, removing p120's Rho-suppressing activity dramatically disrupted the integrity of the apical surface, irrespective of E-cadherin stability. The physical defect was tracked to excessive actomyosin contractility along the vertical axis of lateral membranes. Thus, we suggest that p120's distinct activities towards E-cadherin and Rho are molecularly and functionally coupled and this, in turn, enables the maintenance of cell shape in the larger context of an epithelial monolayer. Importantly, local suppression of contractility by cadherin-bound p120 appears to go beyond regulating cell shape, as loss of this activity also leads to major defects in epithelial lumenogenesis.
© 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.
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16 MeSH Terms
Cdc42 regulates epithelial cell polarity and cytoskeletal function during kidney tubule development.
Elias BC, Das A, Parekh DV, Mernaugh G, Adams R, Yang Z, Brakebusch C, Pozzi A, Marciano DK, Carroll TJ, Zent R
(2015) J Cell Sci 128: 4293-305
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cell Polarity, Cytoskeleton, Epithelial Cells, Kidney Tubules, Mice, cdc42 GTP-Binding Protein
Show Abstract · Added February 4, 2016
The Rho GTPase Cdc42 regulates key signaling pathways required for multiple cell functions, including maintenance of shape, polarity, proliferation, migration, differentiation and morphogenesis. Although previous studies have shown that Cdc42 is required for proper epithelial development and maintenance, its exact molecular function in kidney development is not well understood. In this study, we define the specific role of Cdc42 during murine kidney epithelial tubulogenesis by deleting it selectively at the initiation of ureteric bud or metanephric mesenchyme development. Deletion in either lineage results in abnormal tubulogenesis, with profound defects in polarity, lumen formation and the actin cytoskeleton. Ultimately, these defects lead to renal failure. Additionally, in vitro analysis of Cdc42-null collecting duct cells shows that Cdc42 controls these processes by regulating the polarity Par complex (Par3-Par6-aPKC-Cdc42) and the cytoskeletal proteins N-Wasp and ezrin. Thus, we conclude that the principal role of Cdc42 in ureteric bud and metanephric mesenchyme development is to regulate epithelial cell polarity and the actin cytoskeleton.
© 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.
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7 MeSH Terms