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Digoxin associates with mortality in ESRD.
Chan KE, Lazarus JM, Hakim RM
(2010) J Am Soc Nephrol 21: 1550-9
MeSH Terms: Aged, Cardiotonic Agents, Digoxin, Female, Humans, Kidney Failure, Chronic, Male, Middle Aged, Potassium, Renal Dialysis
Show Abstract · Added May 20, 2014
The safety of prescribing digoxin in ESRD is unknown. Hypokalemia, which frequently occurs among dialysis patients, may enhance the toxicity of digoxin. Here, we analyzed the association between digoxin prescription and survival in a retrospective cohort using covariate- and propensity score-adjusted Cox models to minimize the potential for confounding by indication. Among 120,864 incident hemodialysis patients, digoxin use associated with a 28% increased risk for death (hazard ratio [HR] 1.28; 95% confidence interval 1.25 to 1.31). Increasing serum digoxin level was also significantly associated with mortality (HR 1.19 per ng/ml increase; 95% confidence interval 1.05 to 1.35). This increased mortality risk with level was most pronounced in patients with lower predialysis serum potassium (K) levels (HR 2.53 [P = 0.01] for K <4.3 mEq/L versus HR 0.86 [P = 0.35] for K >4.6 mEq/L). In conclusion, digoxin use among patients who are on hemodialysis associates with increased mortality, especially among those with low predialysis K concentrations.
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10 MeSH Terms
Milrinone use is associated with postoperative atrial fibrillation after cardiac surgery.
Fleming GA, Murray KT, Yu C, Byrne JG, Greelish JP, Petracek MR, Hoff SJ, Ball SK, Brown NJ, Pretorius M
(2008) Circulation 118: 1619-25
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Atrial Fibrillation, Cardiac Surgical Procedures, Cardiotonic Agents, Coronary Disease, Elective Surgical Procedures, Female, Humans, Hypertension, Length of Stay, Logistic Models, Male, Middle Aged, Milrinone, Mitral Valve Insufficiency, Multivariate Analysis, Postoperative Complications, Pulmonary Wedge Pressure, Risk Factors
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
BACKGROUND - Postoperative atrial fibrillation (AF), a frequent complication after cardiac surgery, causes morbidity and prolongs hospitalization. Inotropic drugs are commonly used perioperatively to support ventricular function. This study tested the hypothesis that the use of inotropic drugs is associated with postoperative AF.
METHODS AND RESULTS - We evaluated perioperative risk factors in 232 patients who underwent elective cardiac surgery. All patients were in sinus rhythm at surgery. Sixty-seven patients (28.9%) developed AF a mean of 2.9+/-2.1 days after surgery. Patients who developed AF stayed in the hospital longer (P<0.001) and were more likely to die (P=0.02). Milrinone use was associated with an increased risk of postoperative AF (58.2% versus 26.1% in nonusers; P<0.001). Older age (63.4+/-10.7 versus 56.7+/-12.3 years; P<0.001), hypertension (P=0.04), lower preoperative ejection fraction (P=0.03), mitral valve surgery (P=0.02), right ventricular dysfunction (P=0.03), and higher mean pulmonary artery pressure (27.1+/-9.3 versus 21.8+/-7.5 mm Hg; P=0.001) also were associated with postoperative AF. In multivariable logistic regression, age (P<0.001), ejection fraction (P=0.02), and milrinone use (odds ratio, 4.86; 95% confidence interval, 2.31 to 10.25; P<0.001) independently predicted postoperative AF. When only data from patients with pulmonary artery catheters were analyzed and pulmonary artery pressure was included in the model, age, milrinone use (odds ratio, 4.45; 95% confidence interval, 2.01 to 9.84; P<0.001), and higher pulmonary artery pressure (P=0.02) were associated with an increased risk of postoperative AF. Adding other potential confounders or stratifying analysis by mitral valve surgery did not change the association of milrinone use with postoperative AF.
CONCLUSIONS - Milrinone use is an independent risk factor for postoperative AF after elective cardiac surgery.
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20 MeSH Terms
KATP channel knockout worsens myocardial calcium stress load in vivo and impairs recovery in stunned heart.
Gumina RJ, O'Cochlain DF, Kurtz CE, Bast P, Pucar D, Mishra P, Miki T, Seino S, Macura S, Terzic A
(2007) Am J Physiol Heart Circ Physiol 292: H1706-13
MeSH Terms: Animals, Calcium, Cardiotonic Agents, Dobutamine, Energy Metabolism, Female, Homeostasis, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Myocardial Contraction, Myocardial Stunning, Phenotype, Potassium Channels, Inwardly Rectifying, Recovery of Function, Sex Characteristics, Stress, Physiological
Show Abstract · Added February 21, 2015
Gene knockout of the KCNJ11-encoded Kir6.2 ATP-sensitive K(+) (K(ATP)) channel implicates this stress-response element in the safeguard of cardiac homeostasis under imposed demand. K(ATP) channels are abundant in ventricular sarcolemma, where subunit expression appears to vary between the sexes. A limitation, however, in establishing the full significance of K(ATP) channels in the intact organism has been the inability to monitor in vivo the contribution of the channel to intracellular calcium handling and the superimposed effect of sex that ultimately defines heart function. Here, in vivo manganese-enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance imaging revealed, under dobutamine stress, a significantly greater accumulation of calcium in both male and female K(ATP) channel knockout (Kir6.2-KO) mice compared with sex- and age-matched wild-type (WT) counterparts, with greatest calcium load in Kir6.2-KO females. This translated, poststress, into a sustained contracture manifested by reduced end-diastolic volumes in K(ATP) channel-deficient mice. In response to ischemia-induced stunning, male and female Kir6.2-KO hearts demonstrated accelerated time to contracture and increased peak contracture compared with WT. The outcome on reperfusion, in both male and female Kir6.2-KO hearts, was a transient reduction in systolic performance, measured as rate-pressure product compared with WT, with protracted increase in left ventricular end-diastolic pressure, exaggerated in female knockout hearts, despite comparable leakage of creatine kinase across groups. Kir6.2-KO hearts were rescued from diastolic dysfunction by agents that target alternative pathways of calcium handling. Thus K(ATP) channel deficit confers a greater susceptibility to calcium overload in vivo, accentuated in female hearts, impairing contractile recovery under various conditions of high metabolic demand.
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19 MeSH Terms
Contribution of endothelial nitric oxide to blood pressure in humans.
Gamboa A, Shibao C, Diedrich A, Choi L, Pohar B, Jordan J, Paranjape S, Farley G, Biaggioni I
(2007) Hypertension 49: 170-7
MeSH Terms: Adult, Autonomic Nervous System, Blood Pressure, Cardiotonic Agents, Cardiovascular System, Diastole, Enzyme Inhibitors, Female, Ganglionic Blockers, Humans, Male, Nitric Oxide Synthase Type III, Phenylephrine, Rest, Smoking, Systole, Trimethaphan, omega-N-Methylarginine
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
Impaired endothelial-derived NO (eNO) is invoked in the development of many pathological conditions. Systemic inhibition of NO synthesis, used to assess the importance of NO to blood pressure (BP) regulation, increases BP by approximately 15 mm Hg. This approach underestimates the importance of eNO, because BP is restrained by baroreflex mechanisms and does not account for a role of neurally derived NO. To overcome these limitations, we induced complete autonomic blockade with trimethaphan in 17 normotensive healthy control subjects to eliminate baroreflex mechanisms and contribution of neurally derived NO. Under these conditions, the increase in BP reflects mostly blockade of tonic eNO. N(G)-Monomethyl-l-arginine (250 microg/kg per minute IV) increased mean BP by 6+/-3.7 mm Hg (from 77 to 82 mm Hg) in intact subjects and by 21+/-8.4 mm Hg (from 75 to 96 mm Hg) during autonomic blockade. We did not find a significant contribution of neurally derived NO to BP regulation after accounting for baroreflex buffering. To further validate this approach, we compared the effect of NOS inhibition during autonomic blockade in 10 normotensive individuals with that of 6 normotensive smokers known to have endothelial dysfunction but who were otherwise normal. As expected, normotensive smokers showed a significantly lower increase in systolic BP during selective eNO blockade (11+/-4.5 versus 30+/-2.3 mm Hg in normotensive individuals; P<0.005). Thus, we report a novel approach to preferentially evaluate the role of eNO on BP control in normal and disease states. Our results suggest that eNO is one of the most potent metabolic determinants of BP in humans, tonically restraining it by approximately 30 mm Hg.
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18 MeSH Terms
Improved postoperative outcomes associated with preoperative statin therapy.
Hindler K, Shaw AD, Samuels J, Fulton S, Collard CD, Riedel B
(2006) Anesthesiology 105: 1260-72; quiz 1289-90
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cardiac Surgical Procedures, Cardiotonic Agents, Data Interpretation, Statistical, Humans, Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors, Prospective Studies, Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic, Retrospective Studies, Surgical Procedures, Operative, Treatment Outcome, Vascular Surgical Procedures
Show Abstract · Added October 20, 2015
Statin therapy is well established for prevention of cardiovascular disease. Statins may also reduce postoperative mortality and morbidity via a pleiotropic (non-lipid-lowering) effect. The authors conducted a meta-analysis to determine the influence of statin treatment on adverse postoperative outcomes in patients undergoing cardiac, vascular, or noncardiovascular surgery. Two independent authors abstracted data from 12 retrospective and 3 prospective trials (n = 223,010 patients). A meta-analysis was performed to evaluate the overall effect of preoperative statin therapy on postoperative outcomes. Preoperative statin therapy was associated with 38% and 59% reduction in the risk of mortality after cardiac (1.9% vs. 3.1%; P = 0.0001) and vascular (1.7% vs. 6.1%; P = 0.0001) surgery, respectively. When including noncardiac surgery, a 44% reduction in mortality (2.2% vs. 3.2%; P = 0.0001) was observed. Preoperative statin therapy may reduce postoperative mortality in patients undergoing surgical procedures. However, the statin associated effects on postoperative cardiovascular morbidity are too variable to draw any conclusion.
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12 MeSH Terms
Cardioprotective-mimetics reduce myocardial infarct size in animals resistant to ischemic preconditioning.
Gumina RJ, El Schultz J, Moore J, Beier N, Schelling P, Gross GJ
(2005) Cardiovasc Drugs Ther 19: 315-22
MeSH Terms: Animals, Benzamides, Benzopyrans, Cardiotonic Agents, Dihydropyridines, Disease Models, Animal, Dogs, Heart, Ischemic Preconditioning, Myocardial, Myocardial Infarction, Potassium Channels, Pyrroles, Reperfusion Injury, Sodium-Hydrogen Exchangers, Time Factors
Show Abstract · Added February 21, 2015
BACKGROUND - Ischemic preconditioning (IPC) elicits two distinct windows of cardioprotection, an early phase that lasts for 1-2 h and a delayed phase that lasts for 24-72 h. However, there is conflicting data as to how long the heart is resistant to IPC-induced cardioprotection after the initial protection wanes, leading to the demonstration of IPC-resistance. This resistance to IPC appears to be dependent on the timing of the next IPC stimulus, the species of animals used and the model studied. Furthermore, the mechanisms responsible IPC-resistance are unknown. It is also important to demonstrate therapeutic interventions that will produce cardioprotection during this period of IPC-resistance.
METHODS AND RESULTS - To examine potential mechanisms responsible for acute IPC-induced resistance, the NHE-1 inhibitor EMD 85131 (2-methyl-5-methylsulfonyl-1-(1-pyrrollyl)-benzoylguanidine), which exerts its effects via mechanisms distinct from IPC, and the K(ATP) channel opener bimakalim, which bypasses the signaling mechanisms of IPC to directly open K(ATP) channels, were examined in a canine model of IPC-resistance. One 10 min. IPC stimulus followed by 10 min. of reperfusion produced a significant reduction in IS/AAR compared to Control (7.1 +/- 2.6% versus 26.0 +/- 6.2%; P < 0.05). However, IPC did not significantly protect the myocardium if a 2 h reperfusion period occurred between the initial IPC stimulus and the subsequent prolonged (60 min) ischemic challenge (IS/AAR: 22.5 +/- 4.8%: P > 0.05). Furthermore, hearts treated with IPC followed by 2 h of reperfusion were resistant to an additional IPC stimulus administered just prior to the subsequent 60 min. occlusion period (IS/AAR: 22.9 +/- 3.2%: P > 0.05). In contrast, administration of the NHE-1 inhibitor EMD 85131 (IS/AAR: 7.4 +/- 2.5%: P < 0.05) or the K(ATP) channel opener bimakalim (IS/AAR: 11.8 +/- 2.4%: P < 0.05) both afforded significant cardioprotection when administered at 2 h of reperfusion in previously preconditioned canine hearts resistant to IPC.
CONCLUSIONS - IPC resistance occurs in this canine model of ischemia-reperfusion injury. However, in spite of IPC resistance, hearts can still be pharmacologically protected by direct application of the K(ATP) channel opener bimakalim or the NHE inhibitor EMD 85131.
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15 MeSH Terms
Induction of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) mediates cardioprotective effect of tamoxifen (TAM).
Daosukho C, Ittarat W, Lin SM, Sawyer DB, Kiningham K, Lien YC, St Clair DK
(2005) J Mol Cell Cardiol 39: 792-803
MeSH Terms: Animals, Apoptosis, Cardiotonic Agents, Caspase Inhibitors, Caspases, Doxorubicin, Enzyme Induction, Formazans, Gene Expression, Genotype, In Situ Nick-End Labeling, Male, Mice, Myocytes, Cardiac, RNA, Messenger, Superoxide Dismutase, Tamoxifen, Tetrazolium Salts
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
Tamoxifen (TAM), a synthetic nonsteroidal antiestrogen effectively and widely used for breast cancer treatment, is known to have antioxidant and cardioprotective effects, but whether the beneficial cardiovascular effect of TAM is linked to its antioxidant effect is unknown. In this study, we investigated the effect of TAM on the levels of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), a mitochondrial antioxidant enzyme, in cardiac tissues and cardiomyocytes. TAM treatment induced MnSOD expression in vitro and in vivo. Cardiomyocytes isolated from TAM-pretreated mice also had higher MnSOD levels and fewer apoptotic cells compared to cardiomyocytes from control mice after adriamycin (ADR) treatment. To further confirm the role of MnSOD in the protection against ADR in cardiomyocytes, we used cardiomyocytes isolated from MnSOD knock-out (MnSOD(+/-)), wild-type (NTg) and human MnSOD transgenic (TgH) mice. TUNEL assay indicated that the percentage of cells undergoing apoptosis after ADR treatment was significantly greater in MnSOD(+/-) than in NTg or TgH cardiomyocytes. 3-[4, 5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay showed that basal level of mitochondrial function was lower in MnSOD(+/-) cardiomyocytes than in NTg or TgH, and that MnSOD(+/-) was more sensitive to ADR. ADR treatment increased caspase activity, which was significantly higher in MnSOD(+/-) than in NTg or TgH cardiomyocytes. These results suggested that TAM-induced MnSOD expression is at least, in part, contribute to the cardioprotective effects of TAM.
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18 MeSH Terms
"Inactive" excipients such as Cremophor can affect in vivo drug disposition.
Wandel C, Kim RB, Stein CM
(2003) Clin Pharmacol Ther 73: 394-6
MeSH Terms: ATP Binding Cassette Transporter, Subfamily B, Member 1, Cardiotonic Agents, Digoxin, Excipients, Humans, Pharmaceutical Preparations, Pharmacokinetics, Polyethylene Glycols
Added December 10, 2013
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8 MeSH Terms
Cellular remodeling in heart failure disrupts K(ATP) channel-dependent stress tolerance.
Hodgson DM, Zingman LV, Kane GC, Perez-Terzic C, Bienengraeber M, Ozcan C, Gumina RJ, Pucar D, O'Coclain F, Mann DL, Alekseev AE, Terzic A
(2003) EMBO J 22: 1732-42
MeSH Terms: Adenosine Triphosphate, Animals, Calcium, Cardiac Output, Low, Cardiotonic Agents, Creatine Kinase, Dinitrophenols, Female, Ion Channel Gating, Isoproterenol, Male, Mice, Mitochondria, Myocardium, Myocytes, Cardiac, Patch-Clamp Techniques, Potassium Channels, Transforming Growth Factor alpha, Transgenes, Uncoupling Agents, Ventricular Remodeling
Show Abstract · Added February 21, 2015
ATP-sensitive potassium (K(ATP)) channels are required for maintenance of homeostasis during the metabolically demanding adaptive response to stress. However, in disease, the effect of cellular remodeling on K(ATP) channel behavior and associated tolerance to metabolic insult is unknown. Here, transgenic expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha induced heart failure with typical cardiac structural and energetic alterations. In this paradigm of disease remodeling, K(ATP) channels responded aberrantly to metabolic signals despite intact intrinsic channel properties, implicating defects proximal to the channel. Indeed, cardiomyocytes from failing hearts exhibited mitochondrial and creatine kinase deficits, and thus a reduced potential for metabolic signal generation and transmission. Consequently, K(ATP) channels failed to properly translate cellular distress under metabolic challenge into a protective membrane response. Failing hearts were excessively vulnerable to metabolic insult, demonstrating cardiomyocyte calcium loading and myofibrillar contraction banding, with tolerance improved by K(ATP) channel openers. Thus, disease-induced K(ATP) channel metabolic dysregulation is a contributor to the pathobiology of heart failure, illustrating a mechanism for acquired channelopathy.
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21 MeSH Terms
TGFbeta regulates the expression of G alpha(i2) via an effect on the localization of ras.
Ward SM, Gadbut AP, Tang D, Papageorge AG, Wu L, Li G, Barnett JV, Galper JB
(2002) J Mol Cell Cardiol 34: 1217-26
MeSH Terms: Animals, Carbachol, Cardiotonic Agents, Cells, Cultured, Chick Embryo, Enzyme Inhibitors, Farnesol, GTP-Binding Protein alpha Subunit, Gi2, GTP-Binding Protein alpha Subunits, Gi-Go, Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental, Heart Atria, Heart Rate, Methionine, Myocytes, Cardiac, Parasympathetic Nervous System, Promoter Regions, Genetic, Proto-Oncogene Proteins, Transforming Growth Factor beta, ras Proteins
Show Abstract · Added February 21, 2016
The negative chronotropic response of the heart to parasympathetic stimulation is mediated via the interaction of M(2) muscarinic receptors, Galpha(i2) and the G-protein coupled inward rectifying K(+) channel, GIRK1. Here TGFbeta(1) is shown to decrease the expression of Galpha(i2) in cultured chick atrial cells in parallel with attenuation of the negative chronotropic response to parasympathetic stimulation. The response to the acetylcholine analogue, carbamylcholine, decreased from a 95+/-2% (+/-SEM, n=8) inhibition of beat rate in control cells to 18+/-2% (+/-SEM,n =8) in TGFbeta(1) treated cells. Data support the conclusion that TGFbeta regulation of Galpha(i2) expression was mediated via an effect on Ras. TGFbeta(1) inhibited Galpha(i2) promoter activity by 56+/-6% (+/-SEM, n=4) compared to control. A dominant activating Ras mutant reversed the effect of TGFbeta on Galpha(i2) expression and stimulated Galpha(i2) promoter activity 1.7 fold above control. A dominant negative Ras mutant mimicked the effect of TGFbeta(1) on Galpha(i2) promoter activity. TGFbeta had no effect on the ratio of GDP/GTP bound Ras, but markedly decreased the level of membrane associated Ras and increased the level of cytoplasmic Ras compared to control. Furthermore, farnesol, a precursor to farnesylpyrophosphate, the substrate for the farnesylation of Ras, not only reversed TGFbeta(1) inhibition of Ras localization to the membrane, but also reversed TGFbeta(1) inhibition of Galpha(i2)promoter activity. FTI-277, a specific inhibitor of the farnesylation of Ras, mimicked the effect of TGFbeta(1) on Ras localization and Galpha(i2) promoter activity. These data suggest a novel relationship between TGFbeta signaling, regulation of Ras function and the autonomic response of the heart.
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19 MeSH Terms