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Phase II Study of Two Weeks on, One Week off Sunitinib Scheduling in Patients With Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma.
Jonasch E, Slack RS, Geynisman DM, Hasanov E, Milowsky MI, Rathmell WK, Stovall S, Juarez D, Gilchrist TR, Pruitt L, Ornstein MC, Plimack ER, Tannir NM, Rini BI
(2018) J Clin Oncol 36: 1588-1593
MeSH Terms: Administration, Oral, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Antineoplastic Agents, Carcinoma, Renal Cell, Drug Administration Schedule, Female, Humans, Kidney Neoplasms, Male, Middle Aged, Sunitinib, Surveys and Questionnaires, Treatment Outcome
Show Abstract · Added October 30, 2019
Purpose Standard frontline treatment of patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma currently includes sunitinib. A barrier to long-term treatment with sunitinib includes the development of significant adverse effects, including diarrhea, hand-foot syndrome (HFS), and fatigue. This trial assessed the effect of an alternate 2 weeks on, 1 week off (2/1) schedule of sunitinib on toxicity and efficacy in previously untreated patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Methods Patients started with oral administration of 50 mg sunitinib on a 2/1 schedule and underwent schedule and dose alterations if toxicity developed. The primary end point was < 15% grade ≥ 3 fatigue, diarrhea, or HFS. With 60 patients, the upper bound of the CI would fall below the published 4/2 schedule grade ≥ 3 toxicity rate of 25% to 30%. Results Fifty-nine patients were treated between August 2014 and March 2016. Seventy-seven percent were intermediate or poor risk per Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center criteria. With a median follow-up of 17 months, 25% of patients experienced grade 3 fatigue, HFS, or diarrhea; 37% required a dose reduction, and 10% discontinued because of toxicity. The overall response rate was 57%, median progression-free survival was 13.7 months, and median overall survival was not reached. At 12 weeks, Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General scores dropped between 0% and 10% from baseline, with less reduction in patients who continued treatment longer. Conclusion The primary end point of decreased grade 3 toxicity was not met; however, treatment with a 2/1 sunitinib schedule is associated with a lack of grade 4 toxicity, a low patient discontinuation rate, and high efficacy.
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The Cancer Genome Atlas Comprehensive Molecular Characterization of Renal Cell Carcinoma.
Ricketts CJ, De Cubas AA, Fan H, Smith CC, Lang M, Reznik E, Bowlby R, Gibb EA, Akbani R, Beroukhim R, Bottaro DP, Choueiri TK, Gibbs RA, Godwin AK, Haake S, Hakimi AA, Henske EP, Hsieh JJ, Ho TH, Kanchi RS, Krishnan B, Kwiatkowski DJ, Lui W, Merino MJ, Mills GB, Myers J, Nickerson ML, Reuter VE, Schmidt LS, Shelley CS, Shen H, Shuch B, Signoretti S, Srinivasan R, Tamboli P, Thomas G, Vincent BG, Vocke CD, Wheeler DA, Yang L, Kim WY, Robertson AG, Cancer Genome Atlas Research Network, Spellman PT, Rathmell WK, Linehan WM
(2018) Cell Rep 23: 313-326.e5
MeSH Terms: Biomarkers, Tumor, Carcinoma, Renal Cell, Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor p16, Genome, Human, Humans, Kidney Neoplasms, Metabolic Networks and Pathways, Nuclear Proteins, PTEN Phosphohydrolase, Phenotype, Survival Analysis, Transcription Factors, Tumor Suppressor Proteins, Ubiquitin Thiolesterase
Show Abstract · Added October 30, 2019
Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is not a single disease, but several histologically defined cancers with different genetic drivers, clinical courses, and therapeutic responses. The current study evaluated 843 RCC from the three major histologic subtypes, including 488 clear cell RCC, 274 papillary RCC, and 81 chromophobe RCC. Comprehensive genomic and phenotypic analysis of the RCC subtypes reveals distinctive features of each subtype that provide the foundation for the development of subtype-specific therapeutic and management strategies for patients affected with these cancers. Somatic alteration of BAP1, PBRM1, and PTEN and altered metabolic pathways correlated with subtype-specific decreased survival, while CDKN2A alteration, increased DNA hypermethylation, and increases in the immune-related Th2 gene expression signature correlated with decreased survival within all major histologic subtypes. CIMP-RCC demonstrated an increased immune signature, and a uniform and distinct metabolic expression pattern identified a subset of metabolically divergent (MD) ChRCC that associated with extremely poor survival.
Published by Elsevier Inc.
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The Clinical Presentation, Survival Outcomes, and Management of Patients With Renal Cell Carcinoma and Cardiac Metastasis Without Inferior Vena Cava Involvement: Results From a Pooled Clinical Trial Database and Systematic Review of Reported Cases.
Viteri Malone MA, Ares GR, De Velasco G, Brandão R, Lin X, Norton C, Simantov R, Moslehi J, Krajewski KM, Choueiri TK, McKay RR
(2018) Clin Genitourin Cancer 16: e327-e333
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Carcinoma, Renal Cell, Clinical Trials as Topic, Female, Heart Neoplasms, Humans, Kidney Neoplasms, Male, Middle Aged, Molecular Targeted Therapy, Progression-Free Survival, Retrospective Studies, Survival Analysis, Treatment Outcome, Vena Cava, Inferior
Show Abstract · Added April 22, 2018
BACKGROUND - Cardiac metastases from renal cell carcinoma (RCC) are uncommon and there are limited data regarding the presentation and outcomes of this population. The objective of this study was to evaluate the characteristics and outcomes of patients with RCC with cardiac metastasis without inferior vena cava (IVC) involvement.
MATERIALS AND METHODS - We conducted a pooled retrospective analysis of metastatic RCC patients treated in 4 clinical trials. Additionally, we conducted a systematic review of cases reported in the literature from 1973 to 2015. Patients with cardiac metastases from RCC without IVC involvement were included. Patient and disease characteristics were described. Additionally, treatments, response to therapy, and survival outcomes were summarized.
RESULTS - Of 1765 metastatic RCC patients in the clinical trials database, 10 had cardiac metastases without IVC involvement. All patients received treatment with targeted therapy. There was 1 observed partial response (10%) and 6 patients showed stable disease (60%). The median progression-free survival was 6.9 months. The systematic review of reported clinical cases included 39 patients. In these patients, the most common cardiac site of involvement was the right ventricle (51%; n = 20). Patients were treated with medical (28%; n = 11) and/or surgical treatment (49%; n = 19) depending on whether disease was isolated (n = 13) or multifocal (n = 26).
CONCLUSION - To our knowledge, this is the first series to report on the presentation and outcomes of patients with cardiac metastasis without IVC involvement in RCC. We highlight that although the frequency of patients with cardiac metastases without IVC involvement is low, these patients have a unique clinical presentation and warrant special multidisciplinary management.
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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Ultrasound Molecular Imaging of VEGFR-2 in Clear-Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma Tracks Disease Response to Antiangiogenic and Notch-Inhibition Therapy.
Rojas JD, Lin F, Chiang YC, Chytil A, Chong DC, Bautch VL, Rathmell WK, Dayton PA
(2018) Theranostics 8: 141-155
MeSH Terms: Angiogenesis Inhibitors, Animals, Carcinoma, Renal Cell, Contrast Media, Female, Immunohistochemistry, Kidney Neoplasms, Mice, Molecular Imaging, Platelet Endothelial Cell Adhesion Molecule-1, Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-2
Show Abstract · Added October 30, 2019
Metastatic clear-cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) affects thousands of patients worldwide each year. Antiangiogenic therapy has been shown to have beneficial effects initially, but resistance is eventually developed. Therefore, it is important to accurately track the response of cancer to different therapeutics in order to appropriately adjust the therapy to maximize efficacy. Change in tumor volume is the current gold standard for determining efficacy of treatment. However, functional variations can occur much earlier than measurable volume changes. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) is an important tool for assessing tumor progression and response to therapy, since it can monitor functional changes in the physiology. In this study, we demonstrate how ultrasound molecular imaging (USMI) can accurately track the evolution of the disease and molecular response to treatment. A cohort of NSG (NOD/scid/gamma) mice was injected with ccRCC cells and treated with either the VEGF inhibitor SU (Sunitinib malate, Selleckchem, TX, USA) or the Notch pathway inhibitor GSI (Gamma secretase inhibitor, PF-03084014, Pfizer, New York, NY, USA), or started on SU and later switched to GSI (Switch group). The therapies used in the study focus on disrupting angiogenesis and proper vessel development. SU inhibits signaling of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which is responsible for the sprouting of new vasculature, and GSI inhibits the Notch pathway, which is a key factor in the correct maturation of newly formed vasculature. Microbubble contrast agents targeted to VEGFR-2 (VEGF Receptor) were delivered as a bolus, and the bound agents were imaged in 3D after the free-flowing contrast was cleared from the body. Additionally, the tumors were harvested at the end of the study and stained for CD31. The results show that MI can detect changes in VEGFR-2 expression in the group treated with SU within a week of the start of treatment, while differences in volume only become apparent after the mice have been treated for three weeks. Furthermore, USMI can detect response to therapy in 92% of cases after 1 week of treatment, while the detection rate is only 40% for volume measurements. The amount of targeting for the GSI and Control groups was high throughout the duration of the study, while that of the SU and Switch groups remained low. However, the amount of targeting in the Switch group increased to levels similar to those of the Control group after the treatment was switched to GSI. CD31 staining indicates significantly lower levels of patent vasculature for the SU group compared to the Control and GSI groups. Therefore, the results parallel the expected physiological changes in the tumor, since GSI promotes angiogenesis through the VEGF pathway, while SU inhibits it. This study demonstrates that MI can track disease progression and assess functional changes in tumors before changes in volume are apparent, and thus, CEUS can be a valuable tool for assessing response to therapy in disease. Future work is required to determine whether levels of VEGFR-2 targeting correlate with eventual survival outcomes.
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HNF1B Loss Exacerbates the Development of Chromophobe Renal Cell Carcinomas.
Sun M, Tong P, Kong W, Dong B, Huang Y, Park IY, Zhou L, Liu XD, Ding Z, Zhang X, Bai S, German P, Powell R, Wang Q, Tong X, Tannir NM, Matin SF, Rathmell WK, Fuller GN, McCutcheon IE, Walker CL, Wang J, Jonasch E
(2017) Cancer Res 77: 5313-5326
MeSH Terms: Aneuploidy, Animals, Apoptosis, Carcinoma, Renal Cell, Cell Cycle, Cell Cycle Proteins, Cell Proliferation, Cells, Cultured, Chromosomal Instability, Embryo, Mammalian, Fibroblasts, Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 1-beta, Humans, Kidney Neoplasms, Mad2 Proteins, Mice, Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases
Show Abstract · Added October 30, 2019
Chromophobe renal cell carcinoma (ChRCC) is characterized by major changes in chromosomal copy number (CN). No model is available to precisely elucidate the molecular drivers of this tumor type. HNF1B is a master regulator of gene expression. Here, we report that the transcription factor HNF1B is downregulated in the majority of ChRCC and that the magnitude of loss is unique to ChRCC. We also observed a strong correlation between reduced expression and aneuploidy in ChRCC patients. In murine embryonic fibroblasts or ACHN cells, deficiency reduced expression of the spindle checkpoint proteins MAD2L1 and BUB1B, and the cell-cycle checkpoint proteins RB1 and p27. Furthermore, it altered the chromatin accessibility of , , and genes and triggered aneuploidy development. Analysis of The Cancer Genome Atlas database revealed mutations in 33% of ChRCC where expression was repressed. In clinical specimens, combining loss with mutation produced an association with poor patient prognosis. In cells, combining loss and mutation increased cell proliferation and aneuploidy. Our results show how loss leads to abnormal mitotic protein regulation and induction of aneuploidy. We propose that coordinate loss of and may enhance cellular survival and confer an aggressive phenotype in ChRCC. .
©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.
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Associations between Tumor Vascularity, Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Expression and PET/MRI Radiomic Signatures in Primary Clear-Cell-Renal-Cell-Carcinoma: Proof-of-Concept Study.
Yin Q, Hung SC, Wang L, Lin W, Fielding JR, Rathmell WK, Khandani AH, Woods ME, Milowsky MI, Brooks SA, Wallen EM, Shen D
(2017) Sci Rep 7: 43356
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Carcinoma, Renal Cell, Female, Gene Expression, Humans, Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted, Kidney Neoplasms, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Middle Aged, Neovascularization, Pathologic, Positron-Emission Tomography, Proof of Concept Study, Retrospective Studies, Tumor Burden, Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A
Show Abstract · Added October 30, 2019
Studies have shown that tumor angiogenesis is an essential process for tumor growth, proliferation and metastasis. Also, tumor angiogenesis is an important prognostic factor of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC), as well as a factor in guiding treatment with antiangiogenic agents. Here, we attempted to find the associations between tumor angiogenesis and radiomic imaging features from PET/MRI. Specifically, sparse canonical correlation analysis was conducted on 3 feature datasets (i.e., radiomic imaging features, tumor microvascular density (MVD), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression) from 9 patients with primary ccRCC. In order to overcome the potential bias of intratumoral heterogeneity of angiogenesis, this study investigated the relationship between regional expressions of angiogenesis and VEGF, and localized radiomic features from different parts within the tumors. Our study highlighted the significant strong correlations between radiomic features and MVD, and also demonstrated that the spatiotemporal features extracted from DCE-MRI provided stronger radiomic correlation to MVD than the textural features extracted from Dixon sequences and FDG PET. Furthermore, PET/MRI, which takes advantage of the combined functional and structural information, had higher radiomics correlation to MVD than solely utilizing PET or MRI alone.
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Untangling ccRCC prognosis with SLINKY.
Reinfeld BI, Rathmell WK
(2017) Oncotarget 8: 18620-18621
MeSH Terms: Biomarkers, Tumor, Carcinoma, Renal Cell, Humans, Kidney Neoplasms, Prognosis, RNA, Long Noncoding
Added October 30, 2019
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Strategies to overcome therapeutic resistance in renal cell carcinoma.
Siska PJ, Beckermann KE, Rathmell WK, Haake SM
(2017) Urol Oncol 35: 102-110
MeSH Terms: Angiogenesis Inhibitors, Antineoplastic Agents, Carcinoma, Renal Cell, Clinical Trials as Topic, Costimulatory and Inhibitory T-Cell Receptors, Cytotoxicity, Immunologic, Disease Progression, Disease-Free Survival, Drug Resistance, Neoplasm, Humans, Immunotherapy, Kidney, Kidney Neoplasms, Neoplasm Recurrence, Local, Neovascularization, Pathologic, Nephrectomy, Protein Kinase Inhibitors, Receptors, Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor, Signal Transduction, TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases
Show Abstract · Added April 18, 2017
BACKGROUND - Renal cell cancer (RCC) is a prevalent and lethal disease. At time of diagnosis, most patients present with localized disease. For these patients, the standard of care includes nephrectomy with close monitoring thereafter. While many patients will be cured, 5-year recurrence rates range from 30% to 60%. Furthermore, nearly one-third of patients present with metastatic disease at time of diagnosis. Metastatic disease is rarely curable and typically lethal. Cytotoxic chemotherapy and radiation alone are incapable of controlling the disease. Extensive effort was expended in the development of cytokine therapies but response rates remain low. Newer agents targeting angiogenesis and mTOR signaling emerged in the 2000s and revolutionized patient care. While these agents improve progression free survival, the development of resistance is nearly universal. A new era of immunotherapy is now emerging, led by the checkpoint inhibitors. However, therapeutic resistance remains a complex issue that is likely to persist.
METHODS AND PURPOSE - In this review, we systematically evaluate preclinical research and clinical trials that address resistance to the primary RCC therapies, including anti-angiogenesis agents, mTOR inhibitors, and immunotherapies. As clear cell RCC is the most common adult kidney cancer and has been the focus of most studies, it will be the focus of this review.
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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20 MeSH Terms
Renal cancer subtypes: Should we be lumping or splitting for therapeutic decision making?
Haake SM, Rathmell WK
(2017) Cancer 123: 200-209
MeSH Terms: Carcinoma, Renal Cell, Decision Making, Humans, Kidney Neoplasms
Show Abstract · Added April 18, 2017
The treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma has posed a challenge for decades, in part because of common themes related to intrinsic resistance to cytotoxic chemotherapy and the obscure biology of these cancer types. Forward movement in the treatment of the renal cell carcinomas thus can be approached in 2 ways: by splitting the tumor types along histologic and molecular features, in the hopes of coupling highly precision-focused therapy on a subset of patients who have disease with the most potential for benefit; or by lumping the various biologies and histologies together, to include the rarer renal cell carcinoma types with the more common types. The former strategy satisfies the desire for customized precision in treatment delivery, whereas the latter strategy allows clinicians to offer a wider therapeutic menu in a set of diseases we are continuing to learn about on a physiologic and molecular level. Cancer 2017;123:200-209. © 2016 American Cancer Society.
© 2016 American Cancer Society.
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A Pilot Clinical Study in Characterization of Malignant Renal-cell Carcinoma Subtype with Contrast-enhanced Ultrasound.
Kasoji SK, Chang EH, Mullin LB, Chong WK, Rathmell WK, Dayton PA
(2017) Ultrason Imaging 39: 126-136
MeSH Terms: Carcinoma, Renal Cell, Contrast Media, Diagnosis, Differential, Fluorocarbons, Humans, Kidney Neoplasms, Ultrasonography
Show Abstract · Added October 30, 2019
Malignant renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a diverse set of diseases, which are independently difficult to characterize using conventional MRI and CT protocols due to low temporal resolution to study perfusion characteristics. Because different disease subtypes have different prognoses and involve varying treatment regimens, the ability to determine RCC subtype non-invasively is a clinical need. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) has been assessed as a tool to characterize kidney lesions based on qualitative and quantitative assessment of perfusion patterns, and we hypothesize that this technique might help differentiate disease subtypes. Twelve patients with RCC confirmed pathologically were imaged using contrast-enhanced ultrasound. Time intensity curves were generated and analyzed quantitatively using 10 characteristic metrics. Results showed that peak intensity ( p = 0.001) and time-to-80% on wash-out ( p = 0.004) provided significant differences between clear cell, papillary, and chromophobe RCC subtypes. These results suggest that CEUS may be a feasible test for characterizing RCC subtypes.
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