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Measurement of Blood Volume in Adult Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta).
Hobbs TR, Blue SW, Park BS, Greisel JJ, Conn PM, Pau FK
(2015) J Am Assoc Lab Anim Sci 54: 687-93
MeSH Terms: Adipose Tissue, Aging, Animals, Blood Volume, Blood Volume Determination, Body Composition, Body Weight, Female, Fluorescein-5-isothiocyanate, Hydroxyethyl Starch Derivatives, Iodine Radioisotopes, Macaca mulatta, Male, Sex Characteristics
Show Abstract · Added February 18, 2016
Most biomedical facilities that use rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) limit the amount of blood that may be collected for experimental purposes. These limits typically are expressed as a percentage of blood volume (BV), estimated by using a fixed ratio of blood (mL) per body weight (kg). BV estimation ratios vary widely among facilities and typically do not factor in variables known to influence BV in humans: sex, age, and body condition. We used indicator dilution methodology to determine the BV of 20 adult rhesus macaques (10 male, 10 female) that varied widely in body condition. We measured body composition by using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, weight, crown-to-rump length, and body condition score. Two indicators, FITC-labeled hydroxyethyl starch (FITC-HES) and radioiodinated rhesus serum albumin ((125)I-RhSA), were injected simultaneously, followed by serial blood collection. Plasma volume at time 0 was determined by linear regression. BV was calculated from the plasma volume and Hct. We found that BV calculated by using FITC-HES was consistently lower than BV calculated by using (125)I-RhSA. Sex and age did not significantly affect BV. Percentage body fat was significantly associated with BV. Subjects categorized as having 'optimal' body condition score had 18% body fat and 62.1 mL/kg BV (by FITC-HES; 74.5 mL/kg by (125)I-RhSA). Each 1% increase in body fat corresponded to approximately 1 mL/kg decrease in BV. Body condition score correlated with the body fat percentage (R(2) = 0.7469). We provide an equation for calculating BV from weight and body condition score.
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14 MeSH Terms
Age-related changes in the fracture resistance of male Fischer F344 rat bone.
Uppuganti S, Granke M, Makowski AJ, Does MD, Nyman JS
(2016) Bone 83: 220-232
MeSH Terms: Aging, Animals, Biomechanical Phenomena, Body Weight, Bone and Bones, Femur, Finite Element Analysis, Fractures, Bone, Lumbar Vertebrae, Male, Porosity, Radius, Rats, Inbred F344, Spectrum Analysis, Raman, X-Ray Microtomography
Show Abstract · Added November 30, 2015
In addition to the loss in bone volume that occurs with age, there is a decline in material properties. To test new therapies or diagnostic tools that target such properties as material strength and toughness, a pre-clinical model of aging would be useful in which changes in bone are similar to those that occur with aging in humans. Toward that end, we hypothesized that similar to human bone, the estimated toughness and material strength of cortical bone at the apparent-level decreases with age in the male Fischer F344 rat. In addition, we tested whether the known decline in trabecular architecture in rats translated to an age-related decrease in vertebra (VB) strength and whether non-X-ray techniques could quantify tissue changes at micron and sub-micron length scales. Bones were harvested from 6-, 12-, and 24-month (mo.) old rats (n=12 per age). Despite a loss in trabecular bone with age, VB compressive strength was similar among the age groups. Similarly, whole-bone strength (peak force) in bending was maintained (femur) or increased (radius) with aging. There was though an age-related decrease in post-yield toughness (radius) and bending strength (femur). The ability to resist crack initiation was actually higher for the 12-mo. and 24-mo. than for 6-mo. rats (notch femur), but the estimated work to propagate the crack was less for the aged bone. For the femur diaphysis region, porosity increased while bound water decreased with age. For the radius diaphysis, there was an age-related increase in non-enzymatic and mature enzymatic collagen crosslinks. Raman spectroscopy analysis of embedded cross-sections of the tibia mid-shaft detected an increase in carbonate subsitution with advanced aging for both inner and outer tissue.
Published by Elsevier Inc.
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15 MeSH Terms
Attributing discrimination to weight: associations with well-being, self-care, and disease status in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.
Potter L, Wallston K, Trief P, Ulbrecht J, Juth V, Smyth J
(2015) J Behav Med 38: 863-75
MeSH Terms: Blood Glucose, Body Weight, Depression, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Female, Glycated Hemoglobin A, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Prognosis, Self Care, Self Report, Social Discrimination
Show Abstract · Added July 28, 2015
This study examined the association between attributing self-reported discrimination to weight and diabetes outcomes (glycemic control, diabetes-related distress, and diabetes self-care). A community dwelling sample of 185 adults (mean age 55.4; 80 % White/Caucasian 65 % female) with poorly controlled type 2 diabetes (HbA1c level ≥ 7.5 %) provided demographic and several self-report measures (including diabetes-related distress, diabetes self-care activities, discrimination, and attributions of discrimination), and had height, weight, and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) assessed by trained research staff as part of a larger research study. Individuals who attributed self-reported discrimination to weight had significantly higher HbA1c levels, higher levels of diabetes-related distress, and worse diabetes-related self-care behaviors (general diet, exercise, and glucose testing). These relationships persisted even when controlling for BMI, overall discrimination, depressive symptoms, and demographic characteristics. Results indicate that the perception of weight stigma among individuals with type 2 diabetes is strongly associated with a range of poor diabetes outcomes. Efforts to reduce exposure to and/or teach adaptive coping for weight stigma may benefit patients with type 2 diabetes.
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13 MeSH Terms
Weight-sparing effect of insulin detemir: a consequence of central nervous system-mediated reduced energy intake?
Russell-Jones D, Danne T, Hermansen K, Niswender K, Robertson K, Thalange N, Vasselli JR, Yildiz B, Häring HU
(2015) Diabetes Obes Metab 17: 919-27
MeSH Terms: Blood Glucose, Body Weight, Central Nervous System, Diabetes Mellitus, Energy Intake, Homeostasis, Humans, Hypoglycemic Agents, Insulin Detemir, Kidney, Liver, Weight Gain
Show Abstract · Added February 15, 2016
Insulin therapy is often associated with adverse weight gain. This is attributable, at least in part, to changes in energy balance and insulin's anabolic effects. Adverse weight gain increases the risk of poor macrovascular outcomes in people with diabetes and should therefore be mitigated if possible. Clinical studies have shown that insulin detemir, a basal insulin analogue, exerts a unique weight-sparing effect compared with other basal insulins. To understand this property, several hypotheses have been proposed. These explore the interplay of efferent and afferent signals between the muscles, brain, liver, renal and adipose tissues in response to insulin detemir and comparator basal insulins. The following models have been proposed: insulin detemir may reduce food intake through direct or indirect effects on the central nervous system (CNS); it may have favourable actions on hepatic glucose metabolism through a selective effect on the liver, or it may influence fluid homeostasis through renal effects. Studies have consistently shown that insulin detemir reduces energy intake, and moreover, it is clear that this shift in energy balance is not a consequence of reduced hypoglycaemia. CNS effects may be mediated by direct action, by indirect stimulation by peripheral mediators and/or via a more physiological counter-regulatory response to insulin through restoration of the hepatic-peripheral insulin gradient. Although the precise mechanism remains unclear, it is likely that the weight-sparing effect of insulin detemir can be explained by a combination of mechanisms. The evidence for each hypothesis is considered in this review.
© 2015 The Authors. Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
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12 MeSH Terms
Feasibility and Safety of Intradialysis Yoga and Education in Maintenance Hemodialysis Patients.
Birdee GS, Rothman RL, Sohl SJ, Wertenbaker D, Wheeler A, Bossart C, Balasire O, Ikizler TA
(2015) J Ren Nutr 25: 445-53
MeSH Terms: Adult, Body Mass Index, Body Weight, Feasibility Studies, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, Kidney Failure, Chronic, Male, Middle Aged, Patient Compliance, Patient Education as Topic, Pilot Projects, Quality of Life, Renal Dialysis, Sedentary Behavior, Surveys and Questionnaires, Yoga
Show Abstract · Added May 17, 2015
OBJECTIVE - Patients with end-stage renal disease on maintenance hemodialysis are much more sedentary than healthy individuals. The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility and safety of a 12-week intradialysis yoga intervention versus a kidney education intervention on the promotion of physical activity.
DESIGN AND METHODS - We randomized participants by dialysis shift to either 12-week intradialysis yoga or an educational intervention. Intradialysis yoga was provided by yoga teachers to participants while receiving hemodialysis. Participants receiving the 12-week educational intervention received a modification of a previously developed comprehensive educational program for patients with kidney disease (Kidney School). The primary outcome for this study was feasibility based on recruitment and adherence to the interventions and safety of intradialysis yoga. Secondary outcomes were to determine the feasibility of administering questionnaires at baseline and 12 weeks including the Kidney Disease-Related Quality of Life-36.
RESULTS - Among 56 eligible patients who approached for the study, 31 (55%) were interested and consented to participation, with 18 assigned to intradialysis yoga and 13 to the educational program. A total of 5 participants withdrew from the pilot study, all from the intradialysis yoga group. Two of these participants reported no further interest in participation. Three withdrawn participants switched dialysis times and therefore could no longer receive intradialysis yoga. As a result, 13 of 18 (72%) and 13 of 13 (100%) participants completed 12-week intradialysis yoga and educational programs, respectively. There were no adverse events related to intradialysis yoga. Intervention participants practiced yoga for a median of 21 sessions (70% participation frequency), with 60% of participants practicing at least 2 times a week. Participants in the educational program completed a median of 30 sessions (83% participation frequency). Of participants who completed the study (n = 26), baseline and 12-week questionnaires were obtained from 85%.
CONCLUSIONS - Our pilot study of 12-week intradialysis yoga and 12-week educational intervention reached recruitment goals but with less than targeted completion and adherence to intervention rates. This study provided valuable feasibility data to increase follow-up and adherence for future clinical trials to compare efficacy.
Copyright © 2015 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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18 MeSH Terms
Toxicity studies of coumarin 6-encapsulated polystyrene nanospheres conjugated with peanut agglutinin and poly(N-vinylacetamide) as a colonoscopic imaging agent in rats.
Sakuma S, Kumagai H, Shimosato M, Kitamura T, Mohri K, Ikejima T, Hiwatari K, Koike S, Tobita E, McClure R, Gore JC, Pham W
(2015) Nanomedicine 11: 1227-36
MeSH Terms: Acetamides, Animals, Body Weight, CHO Cells, Caco-2 Cells, Colon, Colonoscopy, Colorectal Neoplasms, Coumarins, Cricetulus, Drinking, Eating, Fluorescent Dyes, Humans, Male, Nanospheres, Peanut Agglutinin, Polystyrenes, Polyvinyls, Rats, Rectum, Thiazoles
Show Abstract · Added February 15, 2016
UNLABELLED - We are investigating an imaging agent that detects early-stage primary colorectal cancer on the mucosal surface in real time under colonoscopic observation. The imaging agent, which is named the nanobeacon, is fluorescent nanospheres conjugated with peanut agglutinin and poly(N-vinylacetamide). Its potential use as an imaging tool for colorectal cancer has been thoroughly validated in numerous studies. Here, toxicities of the nanobeacon were assessed in rats. The nanobeacon was prepared according to the synthetic manner which is being established as the Good Manufacturing Practice-guided production. The rat study was performed in accordance with Good Laboratory Practice regulations. No nanobeacon treatment-related toxicity was observed. The no observable adverse effect levels (NOAEL) of the nanobeacon in 7-day consecutive oral administration and single intrarectal administration were estimated to be more than 1000mg/kg/day and 50mg/kg/day, respectively. We concluded that the nanobeacon could be developed as a safe diagnostic agent for colonoscopy applications.
FROM THE CLINICAL EDITOR - Colon cancer remains a major cause of death. Early detection can result in early treatment and thus survival. In this article, the authors tested potential systemic toxicity of coumarin 6-encapsulated polystyrene nanospheres conjugated with peanut agglutinin (PNA) and poly(N-vinylacetamide) (PNVA), which had been shown to bind specifically to colonic cancer cells and thus very promising in colonoscopic detection of cancer cells.
Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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22 MeSH Terms
Insulin Detemir Is Transported From Blood to Cerebrospinal Fluid and Has Prolonged Central Anorectic Action Relative to NPH Insulin.
Begg DP, May AA, Mul JD, Liu M, D'Alessio DA, Seeley RJ, Woods SC
(2015) Diabetes 64: 2457-66
MeSH Terms: Animals, Appetite Depressants, Biological Transport, Body Composition, Body Weight, Brain, Eating, Hypoglycemic Agents, Injections, Intraperitoneal, Insulin, Insulin Detemir, Insulin, Isophane, Insulin, Long-Acting, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Rats, Rats, Wistar
Show Abstract · Added March 2, 2017
Insulin detemir (DET) reduces glycemia comparably to other long-acting insulin formulations but causes less weight gain. Insulin signaling in the brain is catabolic, reducing food intake. We hypothesized that DET reduces weight gain, relative to other insulins, owing to increased transport into the central nervous system and/or increased catabolic action within the brain. Transport of DET and NPH insulin into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was compared over several hours and after the administration of different doses peripherally in rats. DET and NPH had comparable saturable, receptor-mediated transport into the CSF. CSF insulin remained elevated significantly longer after intraperitoneal DET than after NPH. When administered acutely into the 3rd cerebral ventricle, both DET and NPH insulin reduced food intake and body weight at 24 h, and both food intake and body weight remained lower after DET than after NPH after 48 h. In direct comparison with another long-acting insulin, insulin glargine (GLAR), DET led to more prolonged increases in CSF insulin despite a shorter plasma half-life in both rats and mice. Additionally, peripheral DET administration reduced weight gain and increased CSF insulin compared with saline or GLAR in mice. Overall, these data support the hypothesis that DET has distinct effects on energy balance through enhanced and prolonged centrally mediated reduction of food intake.
© 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.
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18 MeSH Terms
Ube3a imprinting impairs circadian robustness in Angelman syndrome models.
Shi SQ, Bichell TJ, Ihrie RA, Johnson CH
(2015) Curr Biol 25: 537-45
MeSH Terms: ARNTL Transcription Factors, Analysis of Variance, Angelman Syndrome, Animals, Body Weight, Chronotherapy, Circadian Rhythm, Gene Deletion, Genomic Imprinting, Humans, Liver, Mice, Neurons, Sleep Wake Disorders, Ubiquitin-Protein Ligases
Show Abstract · Added February 12, 2015
BACKGROUND - The paternal allele of Ube3a is silenced by imprinting in neurons, and Angelman syndrome (AS) is a disorder arising from a deletion or mutation of the maternal Ube3a allele, which thereby eliminates Ube3a neuronal expression. Sleep disorders such as short sleep duration and increased sleep onset latency are very common in AS.
RESULTS - We found a unique link between neuronal imprinting of Ube3a and circadian rhythms in two mouse models of AS, including enfeebled circadian activity behavior and slowed molecular rhythms in ex vivo brain tissues. As a consequence of compromised circadian behavior, metabolic homeostasis is also disrupted in AS mice. Unsilencing the paternal Ube3a allele restores functional circadian periodicity in neurons deficient in maternal Ube3a but does not affect periodicity in peripheral tissues that are not imprinted for uniparental Ube3a expression. The ubiquitin ligase encoded by Ube3a interacts with the central clock components BMAL1 and BMAL2. Moreover, inactivation of Ube3a expression elevates BMAL1 levels in brain regions that control circadian behavior of AS-model mice, indicating an important role for Ube3a in modulating BMAL1 turnover.
CONCLUSIONS - Ube3a expression constitutes a direct mechanistic connection between symptoms of a human neurological disorder and the central circadian clock mechanism. The lengthened circadian period leads to delayed phase, which could explain the short sleep duration and increased sleep onset latency of AS subjects. Moreover, we report the pharmacological rescue of an AS phenotype, in this case, altered circadian period. These findings reveal potential treatments for sleep disorders in AS patients.
Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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15 MeSH Terms
Deprivation of both sucrose and water reduces the mosquito heart contraction rate while increasing the expression of nitric oxide synthase.
Ellison HE, Estévez-Lao TY, Murphree CS, Hillyer JF
(2015) J Insect Physiol 74: 1-9
MeSH Terms: Animal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena, Animals, Anopheles, Body Weight, Female, Food Deprivation, Heart Rate, Hemolymph, Neuropeptides, Nitric Oxide Synthase, RNA, Messenger, Sucrose, Water Deprivation
Show Abstract · Added February 5, 2016
Adult female mosquitoes rely on carbohydrate-rich plant nectars as their main source of energy. In the present study we tested whether the deprivation of a carbohydrate dietary source or the deprivation of both carbohydrate and water affects mosquito heart physiology. Intravital video imaging of Anopheles gambiae showed that, relative to sucrose fed mosquitoes, the deprivation of both sucrose and water for 24h, but not the deprivation of sucrose alone, reduces the heart contraction rate. Measurement of the protein, carbohydrate and lipid content of mosquitoes in the three treatment groups did not explain this cardiac phenotype. However, while the deprivation of sucrose reduced mosquito weight and abdominal width, the deprivation of both sucrose and water reduced mosquito weight even further without augmenting the change in abdominal width, indirectly suggesting that starvation and dehydration reduces hemolymph pressure. Analysis of the mRNA levels of crustacean cardioactive peptide (CCAP), FMRFamide, corazonin, neuropeptide F and short neuropeptide F then suggested that these neuropeptides do not regulate the cardiac phenotype observed. However, relative to sucrose fed and sucrose deprived mosquitoes, the mRNA level of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) was significantly elevated in mosquitoes that had been deprived of both sucrose and water. Given that nitric oxide suppresses the heart rate of vertebrates and invertebrates, these data suggest a role for this free radical in modulating mosquito heart physiology.
Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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13 MeSH Terms
Effects on anthropometry and appetite of vitamins and minerals given in lipid nutritional supplements for malnourished HIV-infected adults referred for antiretroviral therapy: results from the NUSTART randomized controlled trial.
Rehman AM, Woodd S, PrayGod G, Chisenga M, Siame J, Koethe JR, Heimburger DC, Kelly P, Friis H, Filteau S
(2015) J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr 68: 405-12
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Anthropometry, Appetite, Body Weight, Female, Growth and Development, HIV Infections, Humans, Male, Malnutrition, Middle Aged, Minerals, Tanzania, Treatment Outcome, Vitamins, Young Adult, Zambia
Show Abstract · Added February 12, 2015
BACKGROUND - The evidence base for effects of nutritional interventions for malnourished HIV-infected patients starting antiretroviral therapy (ART) is limited and inconclusive.
OBJECTIVE - We hypothesized that both vitamin and mineral deficiencies and poor appetite limit weight gain in malnourished patients starting ART and that vitamin and mineral supplementation would improve appetite and permit nutritional recovery.
DESIGN - The randomized controlled Nutritional Support for Africans Starting Antiretroviral Therapy trial was conducted in Mwanza, Tanzania, and Lusaka, Zambia. ART-naive adults referred for ART and with body mass index <18.5 kg/m received lipid-based nutritional supplements either without (LNS) or with added vitamins and minerals (LNS-VM), beginning before ART initiation. Participants were given 30 g/d LNS from recruitment until 2 weeks after starting ART and 250 g/d from weeks 2 to 6 of ART.
RESULTS - Of 1815 patients recruited, 365 (20%) died during the study and 813 (45%) provided data at 12 weeks. Controlling for baseline values, anthropometric measures were consistently higher at 12-week ART in the LNS-VM than in the LNS group but statistically significant only for calf and mid-upper arm circumferences and triceps skinfold. Appetite did not differ between groups. Using piecewise mixed-effects quadratic models including all patients and time points, the main effects of LNS-VM were seen after starting ART and were significant for weight, body mass index, and mid-upper arm circumference.
CONCLUSIONS - Provision of high levels of vitamins and minerals to patients referred for ART, delivered with substantial macronutrients, increased nutritional recovery but did not seem to act through treatment group differences in appetite.
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18 MeSH Terms