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Site-specific, intramolecular cross-linking of Pin1 active site residues by the lipid electrophile 4-oxo-2-nonenal.
Aluise CD, Camarillo JM, Shimozu Y, Galligan JJ, Rose KL, Tallman KA, Marnett LJ
(2015) Chem Res Toxicol 28: 817-27
MeSH Terms: Aldehydes, Catalytic Domain, Cell Line, Tumor, Cross-Linking Reagents, Humans, NIMA-Interacting Peptidylprolyl Isomerase, Oxidative Stress, Peptidylprolyl Isomerase, Spectrometry, Mass, Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization
Show Abstract · Added February 22, 2016
Products of oxidative damage to lipids include 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) and 4-oxo-2-nonenal (ONE), both of which are cytotoxic electrophiles. ONE reacts more rapidly with nucleophilic amino acid side chains, resulting in covalent protein adducts, including residue-residue cross-links. Previously, we demonstrated that peptidylprolyl cis/trans isomerase A1 (Pin1) was highly susceptible to adduction by HNE and that the catalytic cysteine (Cys113) was the preferential site of modification. Here, we show that ONE also preferentially adducts Pin1 at the catalytic Cys but results in a profoundly different modification. Results from experiments using purified Pin1 incubated with ONE revealed the principal product to be a Cys-Lys pyrrole-containing cross-link between the side chains of Cys113 and Lys117. In vitro competition assays between HNE and ONE demonstrate that ONE reacts more rapidly than HNE with Cys113. Exposure of RKO cells to alkynyl-ONE (aONE) followed by copper-mediated click chemistry and streptavidin purification revealed that Pin1 is also modified by ONE in cells. Analysis of the Pin1 crystal structure reveals that Cys113 and Lys117 are oriented toward each other in the active site, facilitating formation of an ONE cross-link.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
9 MeSH Terms
Quantitative chemoproteomics for site-specific analysis of protein alkylation by 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal in cells.
Yang J, Tallman KA, Porter NA, Liebler DC
(2015) Anal Chem 87: 2535-41
MeSH Terms: Aldehydes, Alkylation, Chromatography, Liquid, Colorectal Neoplasms, Cross-Linking Reagents, Humans, Neoplasm Proteins, Protein Processing, Post-Translational, Tandem Mass Spectrometry, Tumor Cells, Cultured
Show Abstract · Added February 15, 2016
Protein alkylation by 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE), an endogenous lipid derived electrophile, contributes to stress signaling and cellular toxicity. Although previous work has identified protein targets for HNE alkylation, the sequence specificity of alkylation and dynamics in a cellular context remain largely unexplored. We developed a new quantitative chemoproteomic platform, which uses isotopically tagged, photocleavable azido-biotin reagents to selectively capture and quantify the cellular targets labeled by the alkynyl analogue of HNE (aHNE). Our analyses site-specifically identified and quantified 398 aHNE protein alkylation events (386 cysteine sites and 12 histidine sites) in intact cells. This data set expands by at least an order of magnitude the number of such modification sites previously reported. Although adducts formed by Michael addition are thought to be largely irreversible, we found that most aHNE modifications are lost rapidly in situ. Moreover, aHNE adduct turnover occurs only in intact cells and loss rates are site-selective. This quantitative chemoproteomics platform provides a versatile general approach to map bioorthogonal-chemically engineered post-translational modifications and their cellular dynamics in a site-specific and unbiased manner.
0 Communities
2 Members
0 Resources
10 MeSH Terms
Reactive γ-ketoaldehydes promote protein misfolding and preamyloid oligomer formation in rapidly-activated atrial cells.
Sidorova TN, Yermalitskaya LV, Mace LC, Wells KS, Boutaud O, Prinsen JK, Davies SS, Roberts LJ, Dikalov SI, Glabe CG, Amarnath V, Barnett JV, Murray KT
(2015) J Mol Cell Cardiol 79: 295-302
MeSH Terms: Aldehydes, Amines, Amyloid, Animals, Atrial Natriuretic Factor, Cardiac Pacing, Artificial, Cell Line, Curcumin, Cytosol, Heart Atria, Humans, Mice, Models, Biological, Oxidative Stress, Protein Folding, Protein Multimerization, Superoxides
Show Abstract · Added December 5, 2014
Rapid activation causes remodeling of atrial myocytes resembling that which occurs in experimental and human atrial fibrillation (AF). Using this cellular model, we previously observed transcriptional upregulation of proteins implicated in protein misfolding and amyloidosis. For organ-specific amyloidoses such as Alzheimer's disease, preamyloid oligomers (PAOs) are now recognized to be the primary cytotoxic species. In the setting of oxidative stress, highly-reactive lipid-derived mediators known as γ-ketoaldehydes (γ-KAs) have been identified that rapidly adduct proteins and cause PAO formation for amyloid β1-42 implicated in Alzheimer's. We hypothesized that rapid activation of atrial cells triggers oxidative stress with lipid peroxidation and formation of γ-KAs, which then rapidly crosslink proteins to generate PAOs. To investigate this hypothesis, rapidly-paced and control, spontaneously-beating atrial HL-1 cells were probed with a conformation-specific antibody recognizing PAOs. Rapid stimulation of atrial cells caused the generation of cytosolic PAOs along with a myocyte stress response (e.g., transcriptional upregulation of Nppa and Hspa1a), both of which were absent in control, unpaced cells. Rapid activation also caused the formation of superoxide and γ-KA adducts in atriomyocytes, while direct exposure of cells to γ-KAs resulted in PAO production. Increased cytosolic atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), and the generation of ANP oligomers with exposure to γ-KAs and rapid atrial HL-1 cell stimulation, strongly suggest a role for ANP in PAO formation. Salicylamine (SA) is a small molecule scavenger of γ-KAs that can protect proteins from modification by these reactive compounds. PAO formation and transcriptional remodeling were inhibited when cells were stimulated in the presence of SA, but not with the antioxidant curcumin, which is incapable of scavenging γ-KAs. These results demonstrate that γ-KAs promote protein misfolding and PAO formation as a component of the atrial cell stress response to rapid activation, and they provide a potential mechanistic link between oxidative stress and atrial cell injury.
Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
2 Communities
6 Members
0 Resources
17 MeSH Terms
Mechanism of the third oxidative step in the conversion of androgens to estrogens by cytochrome P450 19A1 steroid aromatase.
Yoshimoto FK, Guengerich FP
(2014) J Am Chem Soc 136: 15016-25
MeSH Terms: Aldehydes, Androgens, Aromatase, Estrogens, Formates, Humans, Kinetics, Oxidation-Reduction, Oxygen, Water
Show Abstract · Added January 20, 2015
Aromatase is the cytochrome P450 enzyme that cleaves the C10-C19 carbon-carbon bond of androgens to form estrogens, in a three-step process. Compound I (FeO(3+)) and ferric peroxide (FeO2(-)) have both been proposed in the literature as the active iron species in the third step, yielding an estrogen and formic acid. Incubation of purified aromatase with its 19-deutero-19-oxo androgen substrate was performed in the presence of (18)O2, and the products were derivatized using a novel diazo reagent. Analysis of the products by high-resolution mass spectrometry showed a lack of (18)O incorporation in the product formic acid, supporting only the Compound I pathway. Furthermore, a new androgen 19-carboxylic acid product was identified. The rates of nonenzymatic hydration of the 19-oxo androgen and dehydration of the 19,19-gem-diol were shown to be catalytically competent. Thus, the evidence supports Compound I and not ferric peroxide as the active iron species in the third step of the steroid aromatase reaction.
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1 Members
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10 MeSH Terms
DC isoketal-modified proteins activate T cells and promote hypertension.
Kirabo A, Fontana V, de Faria AP, Loperena R, Galindo CL, Wu J, Bikineyeva AT, Dikalov S, Xiao L, Chen W, Saleh MA, Trott DW, Itani HA, Vinh A, Amarnath V, Amarnath K, Guzik TJ, Bernstein KE, Shen XZ, Shyr Y, Chen SC, Mernaugh RL, Laffer CL, Elijovich F, Davies SS, Moreno H, Madhur MS, Roberts J, Harrison DG
(2014) J Clin Invest 124: 4642-56
MeSH Terms: Aged, Aldehydes, Angiotensin II, Animals, Antigen-Presenting Cells, B7-1 Antigen, B7-2 Antigen, Cell Proliferation, Cohort Studies, Dendritic Cells, Female, Gene Expression Regulation, Humans, Hypertension, Inflammation, Interleukin-17, Interleukin-1beta, Interleukin-23, Interleukin-6, Kidney, Lymphocyte Activation, Male, Mice, Mice, Transgenic, Middle Aged, Oxidative Stress, Oxygen, Superoxides, T-Lymphocytes
Show Abstract · Added September 26, 2014
Oxidative damage and inflammation are both implicated in the genesis of hypertension; however, the mechanisms by which these stimuli promote hypertension are not fully understood. Here, we have described a pathway in which hypertensive stimuli promote dendritic cell (DC) activation of T cells, ultimately leading to hypertension. Using multiple murine models of hypertension, we determined that proteins oxidatively modified by highly reactive γ-ketoaldehydes (isoketals) are formed in hypertension and accumulate in DCs. Isoketal accumulation was associated with DC production of IL-6, IL-1β, and IL-23 and an increase in costimulatory proteins CD80 and CD86. These activated DCs promoted T cell, particularly CD8+ T cell, proliferation; production of IFN-γ and IL-17A; and hypertension. Moreover, isoketal scavengers prevented these hypertension-associated events. Plasma F2-isoprostanes, which are formed in concert with isoketals, were found to be elevated in humans with treated hypertension and were markedly elevated in patients with resistant hypertension. Isoketal-modified proteins were also markedly elevated in circulating monocytes and DCs from humans with hypertension. Our data reveal that hypertension activates DCs, in large part by promoting the formation of isoketals, and suggest that reducing isoketals has potential as a treatment strategy for this disease.
3 Communities
6 Members
0 Resources
29 MeSH Terms
Stable histone adduction by 4-oxo-2-nonenal: a potential link between oxidative stress and epigenetics.
Galligan JJ, Rose KL, Beavers WN, Hill S, Tallman KA, Tansey WP, Marnett LJ
(2014) J Am Chem Soc 136: 11864-6
MeSH Terms: Acylation, Aldehydes, Binding Sites, Cell Line, Tumor, DNA Adducts, Epigenesis, Genetic, Histones, Humans, Lysine, Models, Molecular, Nucleosomes, Oxidative Stress, Protein Processing, Post-Translational
Show Abstract · Added February 12, 2015
Lipid electrophiles modify cellular targets, altering their function. Here, we describe histones as major targets for modification by 4-oxo-2-nonenal, resulting in a stable Lys modification structurally analogous to other histone Lys acylations. Seven adducts were identified in chromatin isolated from intact cells: four 4-ketoamides to Lys and three Michael adducts to His. A 4-ketoamide adduct residing at H3K27 was identified in stimulated macrophages. Modification of histones H3 and H4 prevented nucleosome assembly.
0 Communities
2 Members
0 Resources
13 MeSH Terms
Alkylation damage by lipid electrophiles targets functional protein systems.
Codreanu SG, Ullery JC, Zhu J, Tallman KA, Beavers WN, Porter NA, Marnett LJ, Zhang B, Liebler DC
(2014) Mol Cell Proteomics 13: 849-59
MeSH Terms: Aldehydes, Alkylation, Cell Line, Electrons, Glutathione, Humans, Lipids, Protein Interaction Maps, Proteins, Proteome
Show Abstract · Added March 20, 2014
Protein alkylation by reactive electrophiles contributes to chemical toxicities and oxidative stress, but the functional impact of alkylation damage across proteomes is poorly understood. We used Click chemistry and shotgun proteomics to profile the accumulation of proteome damage in human cells treated with lipid electrophile probes. Protein target profiles revealed three damage susceptibility classes, as well as proteins that were highly resistant to alkylation. Damage occurred selectively across functional protein interaction networks, with the most highly alkylation-susceptible proteins mapping to networks involved in cytoskeletal regulation. Proteins with lower damage susceptibility mapped to networks involved in protein synthesis and turnover and were alkylated only at electrophile concentrations that caused significant toxicity. Hierarchical susceptibility of proteome systems to alkylation may allow cells to survive sublethal damage while protecting critical cell functions.
0 Communities
4 Members
0 Resources
10 MeSH Terms
Facile synthesis of deuterated and [(14) C]labeled analogs of vanillin and curcumin for use as mechanistic and analytical tools.
Gordon ON, Graham LA, Schneider C
(2013) J Labelled Comp Radiopharm 56: 696-9
MeSH Terms: Benzaldehydes, Carbon Radioisotopes, Curcumin, Isotope Labeling, Radiopharmaceuticals
Show Abstract · Added January 20, 2015
Curcumin is a dietary diphenol with antioxidant, antinflammatory, and antitumor activity. We describe facile procedures for the synthesis of [(14) C2 ]curcumin (4 mCi/mmol), [d6 ]curcumin, [d3 ]curcumin, [(13) C5 ]curcumin, and [d6 ]bicyclopentadione, the major oxidative metabolite of curcumin. We also describe synthesis of the labeled building blocks [(14) C]vanillin, [d3 ]vanillin, and [(13) C5 ]acetylacetone. The overall molar yields of the labeled products were 52 ([(14) C]) and 47% ([d3 ]) for vanillin and 25 ([(14) C2 ]) and 27% ([d6 ]) for curcumin. The compounds can be used as radiotracers in biotransformation studies and as isotopic standards for mass spectrometry-based quantification in pharmacokinetic analyses.
Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
5 MeSH Terms
RNA-seq data analysis at the gene and CDS levels provides a comprehensive view of transcriptome responses induced by 4-hydroxynonenal.
Liu Q, Ullery J, Zhu J, Liebler DC, Marnett LJ, Zhang B
(2013) Mol Biosyst 9: 3036-46
MeSH Terms: Aldehydes, Amino Acid Sequence, Cell Line, Tumor, Colorectal Neoplasms, Gene Expression Profiling, Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic, Humans, Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis, Sequence Analysis, RNA, Transcriptome
Show Abstract · Added March 7, 2014
Reactive electrophiles produced during oxidative stress, such as 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE), are increasingly recognized as contributing factors in a variety of degenerative and inflammatory diseases. Here we used the RNA-seq technology to characterize transcriptome responses in RKO cells induced by HNE at subcytotoxic and cytotoxic doses. RNA-seq analysis rediscovered most of the differentially expressed genes reported by microarray studies and also identified novel gene responses. Interestingly, differential expression detection at the coding DNA sequence (CDS) level helped to further improve the consistency between the two technologies, suggesting the utility and importance of the CDS level analysis. RNA-seq data analysis combining gene and CDS levels yielded an informative and comprehensive picture of gradually evolving response networks with increasing HNE doses, from cell protection against oxidative injury at low dose, initiation of cell apoptosis and DNA damage at intermediate dose to significant deregulation of cellular functions at high dose. These evolving dose-dependent pathway changes, which cannot be observed by the gene level analysis alone, clearly reveal the HNE cytotoxic effect and are supported by IC50 experiments. Additionally, differential expression at the CDS level provides new insights into isoform regulation mechanisms. Taken together, our data demonstrate the power of RNA-seq to identify subtle transcriptome changes and to characterize effects induced by HNE through the generation of high-resolution data coupled with differential analysis at both gene and CDS levels.
0 Communities
3 Members
0 Resources
10 MeSH Terms
Isolevuglandin-modified phosphatidylethanolamine is metabolized by NAPE-hydrolyzing phospholipase D.
Guo L, Gragg SD, Chen Z, Zhang Y, Amarnath V, Davies SS
(2013) J Lipid Res 54: 3151-7
MeSH Terms: Aldehydes, Animals, Gene Silencing, HEK293 Cells, Humans, Hydrolysis, Mice, Phosphatidylethanolamines, Phospholipase D
Show Abstract · Added January 3, 2014
Lipid aldehydes including isolevuglandins (IsoLGs) and 4-hydroxynonenal modify phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) to form proinflammatory and cytotoxic adducts. Therefore, cells may have evolved mechanisms to degrade and prevent accumulation of these potentially harmful compounds. To test if cells could degrade isolevuglandin-modified phosphatidylethanolamine (IsoLG-PE), we generated IsoLG-PE in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells and human umbilical cord endothelial cells and measured its stability over time. We found that IsoLG-PE levels decreased more than 75% after 6 h, suggesting that IsoLG-PE was indeed degraded. Because N-acyl phosphatidylethanolamine-hydrolyzing phospholipase D (NAPE-PLD) has been described as a key enzyme in the hydrolysis of N-acyl phosphatidylethanoamine (NAPE) and both NAPE and IsoLG-PE have large aliphatic headgroups, we considered the possibility that this enzyme might also hydrolyze IsoLG-PE. We found that knockdown of NAPE-PLD expression using small interfering RNA (siRNA) significantly increased the persistence of IsoLG-PE in HEK293 cells. IsoLG-PE competed with NAPE for hydrolysis by recombinant mouse NAPE-PLD, with the catalytic efficiency (V(max)/K(m)) for hydrolysis of IsoLG-PE being 30% of that for hydrolysis of NAPE. LC-MS/MS analysis confirmed that recombinant NAPE-PLD hydrolyzed IsoLG-PE to IsoLG-ethanolamine. These results demonstrate that NAPE-PLD contributes to the degradation of IsoLG-PE and suggest that a major physiological role of NAPE-PLD may be to degrade aldehyde-modified PE, thereby preventing the accumulation of these harmful compounds.
2 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
9 MeSH Terms