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Results: 141 to 146 of 146

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Hemodialysis with cuprophane membrane modulates interleukin-2 receptor expression.
Zaoui P, Green W, Hakim RM
(1991) Kidney Int 39: 1020-6
MeSH Terms: Aged, Cellulose, Humans, Immunity, Cellular, Kidney Failure, Chronic, Leukocytes, Mononuclear, Lymphocyte Activation, Membranes, Artificial, Methylmethacrylates, Middle Aged, Receptors, Interleukin-2, Renal Dialysis
Show Abstract · Added May 20, 2014
Chronic dialysis patients have several indices of immune deficiency. We examined the hypothesis that the biocompatibility of dialysis membranes may influence the ability of lymphocytes to express interleukin-2 (IL-2) receptors on their surface, a key event in cellular immune response. We investigated the potential role of the dialysis membrane in eight chronic hemodialysis patients. The study design was a cross-over study using cuprophane and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) membranes. Chronic dialysis with new cuprophane membrane leads to an increase in baseline expression of the two subunits of IL-2 receptors. IL2R alpha (p55, CD25) and IL-2R beta (p70), in peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC). However, Phytohemagglutinin (PHA) stimulation of PBMC harvested after two weeks of dialysis with cuprophane membrane showed a markedly decreased expression of high affinity IL-2 receptors. These findings are reversed when patients were dialyzed with a PMMA membrane which is also associated with minimal complement activation. The increased expression of IL-2 receptor subunits are reproduced in vitro by direct contact of PBMC with cuprophane membrane and by the addition of the anaphylatoxin C5a. This study confirms the participation of lymphocytes in the complex blood-membrane interactions that occurs during dialysis; the results may be relevant to observations of immune deficiency in dialysis patients.
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12 MeSH Terms
The graft versus leukemia effect: possible mechanisms and clinical significance to the biologic therapy of leukemia.
Sosman JA, Sondel PM
(1991) Bone Marrow Transplant 7 Suppl 1: 33-7
MeSH Terms: Animals, Bone Marrow Transplantation, Combined Modality Therapy, Graft vs Host Disease, Graft vs Host Reaction, Humans, Immunotherapy, Interleukin-2, Leukemia
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
An anti-leukemic effect of allogeneic bone marrow has been repeatedly demonstrated in experimental animal models. Clinical data supporting this "graft versus leukemia" (GVL) effect are derived from several different observations which include: 1) the association of GVHD (acute and chronic) with decreased leukemic relapses; 2) identical twin transplants are associated with a higher relapse rate compared to allogeneic MHC-matched sibling transplants; 3) T cell depletion of donor bone marrow decreases GVHD and increases leukemic relapse rates; 4) Allogeneic BMT without GVHD have a lower leukemic relapse rate compared to identical twin transplants and T cell depleted transplants. The mechanisms of this GVL effect remain poorly understood, but clearly involve the immune system. It is hoped that current advances in basic understanding of the immune system and its activation will enable the "antileukemic" components of the GVL effect to be prospectively controlled and intentionally used as leukemia therapy.
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9 MeSH Terms
Prolonged interleukin-2 (IL-2) treatment can augment immune activation without enhancing antitumor activity in renal cell carcinoma.
Sosman JA, Hank JA, Moore KH, Borchert A, Schell K, Kohler PC, Goldstein D, Bechhofer R, Storer B, Albertini MR
(1991) Cancer Invest 9: 35-48
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Carcinoma, Renal Cell, Cytotoxicity, Immunologic, Drug Administration Schedule, Female, Humans, Hypotension, Interleukin-2, Kidney Neoplasms, Killer Cells, Lymphokine-Activated, Killer Cells, Natural, Leukocytosis, Male, Middle Aged, Pilot Projects, Recombinant Proteins
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
Preliminary studies involving small numbers of patients have suggested that interleukin-2 (IL-2) administered by continuous infusion in repetitive weekly cycles using doses of 3 x 10(6) U/M2/day is immunologically active and can induce tumor responses in patients with renal cell carcinoma. This study was designed to examine both the immunological and clinical effects of prolonged infusion IL-2 given by repetitive weekly cycles; first at moderate doses for 4 weeks as an impatient followed by lower doses of IL-2 for up to 5 months. Prolonged IL-2 treatment was investigated because previous studies revealed that patients had a return to their baseline immune status within 4 weeks after completing IL-2 treatment. Twenty-five patients (including 18 with renal cell carcinoma) were treated with one of two regimens utilizing IL-2 as sole therapy. These regimens were designed to induce augmented and prolonged immune activation based upon in vitro and in vivo data. Though patients on both arms of the study demonstrated sustained lymphocytosis, increase in numbers of natural killer cells, and induction of lymphokine-activated killer activity with prolonged IL-2 administration, only 1 out of the 18 patients with renal cell carcinoma demonstrated a sustained partial antitumor response to therapy. Furthermore, several patients demonstrated profound immune activation, without any evidence of tumor regression. The lack of clinical responses in these patients showing marked activation of LAK cytotoxicity suggests that other variables must also influence the likelihood of antitumor effects for patients receiving IL-2 therapy.
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17 MeSH Terms
Activation of human T cells obtained pre- and post-interleukin-2 (IL-2) therapy by anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody plus IL-2: implications for combined in vivo treatment.
Weil-Hillman G, Schell K, Segal DM, Hank JA, Sosman JA, Sondel PM
(1991) J Immunother (1991) 10: 267-77
MeSH Terms: Antibodies, Monoclonal, Antigens, Differentiation, T-Lymphocyte, CD3 Complex, Cytotoxicity, Immunologic, Humans, Immunotherapy, Interleukin-2, Killer Cells, Natural, Lymphocyte Activation, Neoplasms, Receptors, Antigen, T-Cell, T-Lymphocytes
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
The role of activated T cells in the mediation of antitumor responses has been documented in several experimental models. In some of these, interleukin-2 (IL-2) has been used as a means to induce and expand the antitumor effects of the T cells. IL-2 has been tested in clinical trials for cancer treatment. Surprisingly, T cells appear to be inactivated by IL-2 in these clinical trials. T cells obtained from peripheral blood after IL-2 therapy showed decreased responses to mitogens and alloantigens, did not proliferate in vitro in response to IL-2, and did not mediate non-major histocompatibility complex-restricted cytotoxicity or targeted lysis in the presence of bispecific monoclonal antibodies. In this study, we present evidence that these post-IL-2 therapy T cells are not irreversibly inactivated; they can be activated in vitro by anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody together with IL-2 to upregulate the p55 component of the IL-2 receptor and proliferate. Nevertheless, following activation by anti-CD3 and IL-2, the level of targeted T-cell cytotoxicity mediated by the post-IL-2 therapy T cells was significantly lower than that by pre-IL-2 therapy T cells. Although in vivo treatment with IL-2 alone induces natural killer (NK) cells to mediate lymphokine-activated killer activity, these data suggest that the T-cell lytic function is inhibited by this treatment and only partially reversible by subsequent T-cell receptor activation using anti-CD3 mAb. Exposure of T cells to anti-CD3 mAb prior to in vivo IL-2 treatment generates T-cell lytic activity in vitro. These results, together with preclinical murine studies, suggest that a combined in vivo protocol of anti-CD3 mAb and IL-2, starting first with the anti-CD3 mAb, may cause activation of the T cells in addition to the activation of NK cells and thus warrant clinical testing.
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12 MeSH Terms
Natural killer cells activated by interleukin 2 treatment in vivo respond to interleukin 2 primarily through the p75 receptor and maintain the p55 (TAC) negative phenotype.
Weil-Hillman G, Voss SD, Fisch P, Schell K, Hank JA, Sosman JA, Sugamura K, Sondel PM
(1990) Cancer Res 50: 2683-91
MeSH Terms: Antibodies, Monoclonal, Antigens, Differentiation, T-Lymphocyte, CD3 Complex, CD56 Antigen, Dose-Response Relationship, Drug, Humans, Interleukin-2, Killer Cells, Lymphokine-Activated, Lymphocyte Activation, Phenotype, Receptors, Antigen, T-Cell, Receptors, Interleukin-2
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
Interleukin 2 (IL-2) induced activation of unstimulated resting natural killer (NK) cells or resting T-cells initially occurs following binding of IL-2 through the p75 receptor that is expressed primarily by these cells. However, this IL-2/p75 interaction induces TAC chain synthesis and formation of high affinity IL-2 receptor required for the proliferation of resting peripheral blood lymphocytes. In this study, we present data indicating that NK cells activated by in vivo IL-2 treatment, in contrast to resting NK cells, respond and proliferate to further IL-2 in vitro using primarily the p75 receptor with only a minor component of cells responding through the high affinity receptor. These in vivo activated NK cells minimally expressed the TAC chain and maintained this TAC negative phenotype while proliferating in response to IL-2. The primary involvement of the p75 receptor in the proliferative response of these cells to IL-2 was demonstrated by the need for concentrations of IL-2 higher than 44 pM to obtain a significant response and by the dramatic inhibition of this response by anti-p75 monoclonal antibody. Anti-TAC monoclonal antibody inhibited only the poor proliferation obtained at low doses of IL-2 suggesting a minor role for TAC and high affinity IL-2 receptors. This was in contrast to the partial inhibition of proliferation by anti-p75 or anti-TAC observed in unstimulated pretherapy peripheral blood lymphocytes suggesting that these cells respond to IL-2 through both high affinity receptors and intermediate affinity p75 receptors. The T-cells isolated from in vivo activated peripheral blood lymphocytes, despite expressing TAC, were not responsive to IL-2, suggesting that these cells express predominantly nonfunctional low affinity TAC receptors. NK cells activated by IL-2 in vivo represent a unique model system of IL-2 dependent cells that respond and proliferate to IL-2 essentially through the p75 IL-2 receptor.
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12 MeSH Terms
IL-4 induces IL-2 receptor p75 beta-chain gene expression and IL-2-dependent proliferation in mouse T lymphocytes.
Casey LS, Lichtman AH, Boothby M
(1992) J Immunol 148: 3418-26
MeSH Terms: Animals, B-Lymphocytes, Gene Expression, Interleukin-2, Interleukin-4, Lymphocyte Activation, Mice, RNA, Messenger, Receptors, Interleukin-2, Spleen, T-Lymphocytes, Transcription, Genetic
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
T and B cells exhibit complex responses to the combination of IL-2 and IL-4, each of which can act as a growth or differentiation factor for lymphocytes under certain circumstances. To characterize better the mechanism by which these cytokines interact, mRNA levels of the signal-transducing p75 beta-chain of the IL-2R were analyzed. These studies show that IL-4 increases expression of the IL-2R beta-chain in mouse splenic B and T cells, and the response of B cells was potentiated by concurrent cross-linking of surface Ig. Kinetic analysis of the IL-2R beta response showed a slow onset but maintenance of peak levels of expression between 10 and 24 h. These data indicate that the pathways involved in the lymphocyte response to IL-4 differ for IL-2R and IL-4R, and that the induction of IL-4R precedes the increase in IL-2R. The effect of IL-4 on IL-2R beta mRNA levels was mediated in part by an increase in the rate of gene transcription, and was associated with increased IL-2 binding in the absence of any change in IL-2R alpha levels. In addition, IL-4 increased the level of IL-2R beta expression in thymocytes. Proliferation assays demonstrated that pretreatment of splenic T cells with IL-4 led to a substantial increase in IL-2-dependent proliferation. These results are consistent with a mechanism by which IL-4 can prime T cells and certain thymocytes for responsiveness to IL-2 by increasing IL-2R p75 chain gene expression, independent of general T cell activation.
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12 MeSH Terms