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The publication data currently available has been vetted by Vanderbilt faculty, staff, administrators and trainees. The data itself is retrieved directly from NCBI's PubMed and is automatically updated on a weekly basis to ensure accuracy and completeness.

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Results: 121 to 130 of 140

Publication Record

Connections

Drinking from the firehose of scientific publishing.
Patil C, Siegel V
(2009) Dis Model Mech 2: 100-2
MeSH Terms: Access to Information, Animals, Biomedical Research, Disease Models, Animal, Editorial Policies, Humans, Internet, Peer Review, Research, Periodicals as Topic, PubMed, Publications, Publishing
Show Abstract · Added December 1, 2015
The fundamental question is this: can the wisdom of crowds be exploited to post-filter the literature?
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
12 MeSH Terms
Courting change.
Siegel V
(2009) Dis Model Mech 2: 97-9
MeSH Terms: Animals, Biomedical Research, Communication, Diffusion of Innovation, Disease Models, Animal, Humans, Internet, Periodicals as Topic, Publishing
Show Abstract · Added December 1, 2015
In scientific communication, the long tail has not yet appeared. Why not?
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
9 MeSH Terms
I kid you not.
Siegel V
(2009) Dis Model Mech 2: 5-6
MeSH Terms: Animals, Biomedical Research, Democracy, Disease Models, Animal, Humans, Politics, Public Opinion, United States
Added December 1, 2015
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
8 MeSH Terms
Where credit is due.
Siegel V
(2008) Dis Model Mech 1: 187-91
MeSH Terms: Biomedical Research, Cooperative Behavior, Creativity
Added December 1, 2015
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
3 MeSH Terms
Cooperative group research efforts in lung cancer 2008: focus on advanced-stage non-small-cell lung cancer.
Wakelee H, Kernstine K, Vokes E, Schiller J, Baas P, Saijo N, Adjei A, Goss G, Gaspar L, Gandara DR, Choy H, Putnam JB
(2008) Clin Lung Cancer 9: 346-51
MeSH Terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Biomedical Research, Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung, Clinical Trials as Topic, ErbB Receptors, Humans, International Cooperation, Lung Neoplasms
Show Abstract · Added March 27, 2014
Clinical trials performed within the cooperative group system play a substantial role in the advancing of lung cancer therapy. Interactions between the leaders of the cooperative groups are critical and occur regularly throughout the year, but the annual Lung Cancer Congress provides a unique forum for representatives from each group to present ongoing and planned studies in an interactive forum. Herein, we highlight discussion from the 9th annual Lung Cancer Congress in June 2008, focused on advanced-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Many studies are looking at the addition of targeted agents such as bevacizumab, cetuximab, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor inhibitors, and apoptosis-inducing agents to chemotherapy. Personalizing therapy by better selection of patients for particular drugs is also being emphasized, most notably epidermal growth factor receptor fluorescence in situ hybridization overexpression and other predictions of response with cetuximab. Future articles in this series will address early and locally advanced NSCLC as well as other thoracic malignancies such as small-cell lung cancer and mesothelioma. Ongoing trials within the cooperative groups are an essential component of the persistent improvement in the treatment of lung cancer.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
8 MeSH Terms
Centralized oversight of physician-scientist faculty development at Vanderbilt: early outcomes.
Brown AM, Morrow JD, Limbird LE, Byrne DW, Gabbe SG, Balser JR, Brown NJ
(2008) Acad Med 83: 969-75
MeSH Terms: Academic Medical Centers, Biomedical Research, Career Choice, Education, Medical, Faculty, Medical, Financing, Organized, Humans, National Institutes of Health (U.S.), Physicians, Program Development, Program Evaluation, Quality Control, Research Personnel, Research Support as Topic, Tennessee, United States
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
PURPOSE - In 2000, faced with a national concern over the decreasing number of physician-scientists, Vanderbilt School of Medicine established the institutionally funded Vanderbilt Physician-Scientist Development (VPSD) program to provide centralized oversight and financial support for physician-scientist career development. In 2002, Vanderbilt developed the National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded Vanderbilt Clinical Research Scholars (VCRS) program using a similar model of centralized oversight. The authors evaluate the impact of the VPSD and VCRS programs on early career outcomes of physician-scientists.
METHOD - Physician-scientists who entered the VPSD or VCRS programs from 2000 through 2006 were compared with Vanderbilt physician-scientists who received NIH career development funding during the same period without participating in the VPSD or VCRS programs.
RESULTS - Seventy-five percent of VPSD and 60% of VCRS participants achieved individual career award funding at a younger age than the comparison cohort. This shift to career development award funding at a younger age among VPSD and VCRS scholars was accompanied by a 2.6-fold increase in the number of new K awards funded and a rate of growth in K-award dollars at Vanderbilt that outpaced the national rate of growth in K-award funding.
CONCLUSIONS - Analysis of the early outcomes of the VPSD and VCRS programs suggests that centralized oversight can catalyze growth in the number of funded physician-scientists at an institution. Investment in this model of career development for physician-scientists may have had an additive effect on the recruitment and retention of talented trainees and junior faculty.
0 Communities
2 Members
0 Resources
16 MeSH Terms
Perspectives on imaging mass spectrometry in biology and medicine.
Caprioli RM
(2008) Proteomics 8: 3679-80
MeSH Terms: Biomedical Research, Mass Spectrometry
Added March 3, 2020
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
MeSH Terms
It is time to take a stand for medical research and against terrorism targeting medical scientists.
Krystal JH, Carter CS, Geschwind D, Manji HK, March JS, Nestler EJ, Zubieta JK, Charney DS, Goldman D, Gur RE, Lieberman JA, Roy-Byrne P, Rubinow DR, Anderson SA, Barondes S, Berman KF, Blair J, Braff DL, Brown ES, Calabrese JR, Carlezon WA, Cook EH, Davidson RJ, Davis M, Desimone R, Drevets WC, Duman RS, Essock SM, Faraone SV, Freedman R, Friston KJ, Gelernter J, Geller B, Gill M, Gould E, Grace AA, Grillon C, Gueorguieva R, Hariri AR, Innis RB, Jones EG, Kleinman JE, Koob GF, Krystal AD, Leibenluft E, Levinson DF, Levitt PR, Lewis DA, Liberzon I, Lipska BK, Marder SR, Markou A, Mason GF, McDougle CJ, McEwen BS, McMahon FJ, Meaney MJ, Meltzer HY, Merikangas KR, Meyer-Lindenberg A, Mirnics K, Monteggia LM, Neumeister A, O'Brien CP, Owen MJ, Pine DS, Rapoport JL, Rauch SL, Robbins TW, Rosenbaum JF, Rosenberg DR, Ross CA, Rush AJ, Sackeim HA, Sanacora G, Schatzberg AF, Shaham Y, Siever LJ, Sunderland T, Tecott LH, Thase ME, Todd RD, Weissman MM, Yehuda R, Yoshikawa T, Young EA, McCandless R
(2008) Biol Psychiatry 63: 725-7
MeSH Terms: Animal Experimentation, Animal Rights, Animals, Attitude of Health Personnel, Biomedical Research, Crime, Ethics, Research, Humans, Primates, Research Personnel, Terrorism, United States
Added May 19, 2014
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
12 MeSH Terms
New challenges and paradigms for mid-career faculty in academic medical centers: key strategies for success for mid-career medical school faculty.
Golper TA, Feldman HI
(2008) Clin J Am Soc Nephrol 3: 1870-4
MeSH Terms: Academic Medical Centers, Attitude of Health Personnel, Biomedical Research, Career Mobility, Conflict, Psychological, Cooperative Behavior, Education, Medical, Faculty, Medical, Humans, Job Satisfaction, Mentors, Nephrology, Physician Incentive Plans, Reimbursement, Incentive, Relative Value Scales, Research Support as Topic, Salaries and Fringe Benefits, Staff Development, Workload
Added March 19, 2014
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
19 MeSH Terms
Building global health through a center-without-walls: the Vanderbilt Institute for Global Health.
Vermund SH, Sahasrabuddhe VV, Khedkar S, Jia Y, Etherington C, Vergara A
(2008) Acad Med 83: 154-64
MeSH Terms: Biomedical Research, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, U.S., Developing Countries, Global Health, Health Services Research, Humans, Interinstitutional Relations, International Educational Exchange, National Institutes of Health (U.S.), Schools, Medical, Tennessee, United States
Show Abstract · Added March 5, 2014
The Institute for Global Health at Vanderbilt enables the expansion and coordination of global health research, service, and training, reflecting the university's commitment to improve health services and outcomes in resource-limited settings. Global health encompasses both prevention via public health and treatment via medical care, all nested within a broader community-development context. This has fostered university-wide collaborations to address education, business/economics, engineering, nursing, and language training, among others. The institute is a natural facilitator for team building and has been especially helpful in organizing institutional responses to global health solicitations from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), Centers for Disease Control (CDC), and other funding agencies. This center-without-walls philosophy nurtures noncompetitive partnerships among and within departments and schools. With extramural support from the NIH and from endowment and developmental investments from the school of medicine, the institute funds new pilot projects to nurture global educational and research exchanges related to health and development. Vanderbilt's newest programs are a CDC-supported HIV/AIDS service initiative in Africa and an overseas research training program for health science graduate students and clinical fellows. New opportunities are available for Vanderbilt students, staff, and faculty to work abroad in partnership with international health projects through a number of Tennessee institutions now networked with the institute. A center-without-walls may be a model for institutions contemplating strategic investments to better organize service and teaching opportunities abroad, and to achieve greater successes in leveraging extramural support for overseas and domestic work focused on tropical medicine and global health.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
12 MeSH Terms