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Bergmann glial Sonic hedgehog signaling activity is required for proper cerebellar cortical expansion and architecture.
Cheng FY, Fleming JT, Chiang C
(2018) Dev Biol 440: 152-166
MeSH Terms: Animals, Astrocytes, Cell Differentiation, Cell Division, Cell Proliferation, Cells, Cultured, Cerebellar Cortex, Cerebellar Neoplasms, Cerebellum, Developmental Disabilities, Hedgehog Proteins, Mice, Nervous System Malformations, Neural Stem Cells, Neuroglia, Neurons, Purkinje Cells, Signal Transduction, Wnt Signaling Pathway
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2019
Neuronal-glial relationships play a critical role in the maintenance of central nervous system architecture and neuronal specification. A deeper understanding of these relationships can elucidate cellular cross-talk capable of sustaining proper development of neural tissues. In the cerebellum, cerebellar granule neuron precursors (CGNPs) proliferate in response to Purkinje neuron-derived Sonic hedgehog (Shh) before ultimately exiting the cell cycle and migrating radially along Bergmann glial fibers. However, the function of Bergmann glia in CGNP proliferation remains not well defined. Interestingly, the Hh pathway is also activated in Bergmann glia, but the role of Shh signaling in these cells is unknown. In this study, we show that specific ablation of Shh signaling using the tamoxifen-inducible TNC line to eliminate Shh pathway activator Smoothened in Bergmann glia is sufficient to cause severe cerebellar hypoplasia and a significant reduction in CGNP proliferation. TNC; Smo (Smo) mice demonstrate an obvious reduction in cerebellar size within two days of ablation of Shh signaling. Mutant cerebella have severely reduced proliferation and increased differentiation of CGNPs due to a significant decrease in Shh activity and concomitant activation of Wnt signaling in Smo CGNPs, suggesting that this pathway is involved in cross-talk with the Shh pathway in regulating CGNP proliferation. In addition, Purkinje cells are ectopically located, their dendrites stunted, and the Bergmann glial network disorganized. Collectively, these data demonstrate a previously unappreciated role for Bergmann glial Shh signaling activity in the proliferation of CGNPs and proper maintenance of cerebellar architecture.
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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MeSH Terms
Single-Cell Transcriptomic Profiling of Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived SCGB3A2+ Airway Epithelium.
McCauley KB, Alysandratos KD, Jacob A, Hawkins F, Caballero IS, Vedaie M, Yang W, Slovik KJ, Morley M, Carraro G, Kook S, Guttentag SH, Stripp BR, Morrisey EE, Kotton DN
(2018) Stem Cell Reports 10: 1579-1595
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cell Differentiation, Cell Line, Cell Lineage, Cell Plasticity, Epithelium, Gene Expression Profiling, Genes, Reporter, Humans, Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells, Kinetics, Lung, Mice, Secretoglobins, Sequence Analysis, RNA, Single-Cell Analysis, Solubility, Spheroids, Cellular, Time Factors, Transcriptome, Wnt Signaling Pathway
Show Abstract · Added April 1, 2019
Lung epithelial lineages have been difficult to maintain in pure form in vitro, and lineage-specific reporters have proven invaluable for monitoring their emergence from cultured pluripotent stem cells (PSCs). However, reporter constructs for tracking proximal airway lineages generated from PSCs have not been previously available, limiting the characterization of these cells. Here, we engineer mouse and human PSC lines carrying airway secretory lineage reporters that facilitate the tracking, purification, and profiling of this lung subtype. Through bulk and single-cell-based global transcriptomic profiling, we find PSC-derived airway secretory cells are susceptible to phenotypic plasticity exemplified by the tendency to co-express both a proximal airway secretory program as well as an alveolar type 2 cell program, which can be minimized by inhibiting endogenous Wnt signaling. Our results provide global profiles of engineered lung cell fates, a guide for improving their directed differentiation, and a human model of the developing airway.
Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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21 MeSH Terms
APC Inhibits Ligand-Independent Wnt Signaling by the Clathrin Endocytic Pathway.
Saito-Diaz K, Benchabane H, Tiwari A, Tian A, Li B, Thompson JJ, Hyde AS, Sawyer LM, Jodoin JN, Santos E, Lee LA, Coffey RJ, Beauchamp RD, Williams CS, Kenworthy AK, Robbins DJ, Ahmed Y, Lee E
(2018) Dev Cell 44: 566-581.e8
MeSH Terms: Adenomatous Polyposis Coli Protein, Animals, Cells, Cultured, Clathrin, Drosophila melanogaster, Endocytosis, Female, Humans, Infant, Ligands, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Middle Aged, Wnt Proteins, Wnt Signaling Pathway, beta Catenin
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) mutations cause Wnt pathway activation in human cancers. Current models for APC action emphasize its role in promoting β-catenin degradation downstream of Wnt receptors. Unexpectedly, we find that blocking Wnt receptor activity in APC-deficient cells inhibits Wnt signaling independently of Wnt ligand. We also show that inducible loss of APC is rapidly followed by Wnt receptor activation and increased β-catenin levels. In contrast, APC2 loss does not promote receptor activation. We show that APC exists in a complex with clathrin and that Wnt pathway activation in APC-deficient cells requires clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Finally, we demonstrate conservation of this mechanism in Drosophila intestinal stem cells. We propose a model in which APC and APC2 function to promote β-catenin degradation, and APC also acts as a molecular "gatekeeper" to block receptor activation via the clathrin pathway.
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
0 Communities
4 Members
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18 MeSH Terms
Wnt6 maintains anterior escort cells as an integral component of the germline stem cell niche.
Wang X, Page-McCaw A
(2018) Development 145:
MeSH Terms: Animals, Animals, Genetically Modified, Bone Morphogenetic Proteins, Cadherins, Cell Count, Cell Differentiation, Cell Lineage, Cell Survival, Drosophila Proteins, Drosophila melanogaster, Female, Germ Cells, Ligands, Models, Biological, Ovary, Signal Transduction, Stem Cell Niche, Wnt Proteins
Show Abstract · Added March 20, 2018
Stem cells reside in a niche, a local environment whose cellular and molecular complexity is still being elucidated. In ovaries, germline stem cells depend on cap cells for self-renewing signals and physical attachment. Germline stem cells also contact the anterior escort cells, and here we report that anterior escort cells are absolutely required for germline stem cell maintenance. When escort cells die from impaired Wnt signaling or expression, the loss of anterior escort cells causes loss of germline stem cells. Anterior escort cells function as an integral niche component by promoting DE-cadherin anchorage and by transiently expressing the Dpp ligand to promote full-strength BMP signaling in germline stem cells. Anterior escort cells are maintained by Wnt6 ligands produced by cap cells; without Wnt6 signaling, anterior escort cells die leaving vacancies in the niche, leading to loss of germline stem cells. Our data identify anterior escort cells as constituents of the germline stem cell niche, maintained by a cap cell-produced Wnt6 survival signal.
© 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.
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1 Members
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18 MeSH Terms
RHOA GTPase Controls YAP-Mediated EREG Signaling in Small Intestinal Stem Cell Maintenance.
Liu M, Zhang Z, Sampson L, Zhou X, Nalapareddy K, Feng Y, Akunuru S, Melendez J, Davis AK, Bi F, Geiger H, Xin M, Zheng Y
(2017) Stem Cell Reports 9: 1961-1975
MeSH Terms: Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing, Animals, Cell Differentiation, Cell Proliferation, Epiregulin, Epithelium, Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental, Intestine, Small, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Morphogenesis, Phosphoproteins, Stem Cells, Wnt Signaling Pathway, beta Catenin, rho GTP-Binding Proteins
Show Abstract · Added February 7, 2018
RHOA, a founding member of the Rho GTPase family, is critical for actomyosin dynamics, polarity, and morphogenesis in response to developmental cues, mechanical stress, and inflammation. In murine small intestinal epithelium, inducible RHOA deletion causes a loss of epithelial polarity, with disrupted villi and crypt organization. In the intestinal crypts, RHOA deficiency results in reduced cell proliferation, increased apoptosis, and a loss of intestinal stem cells (ISCs) that mimic effects of radiation damage. Mechanistically, RHOA loss reduces YAP signaling of the Hippo pathway and affects YAP effector epiregulin (EREG) expression in the crypts. Expression of an active YAP (S112A) mutant rescues ISC marker expression, ISC regeneration, and ISC-associated Wnt signaling, but not defective epithelial polarity, in RhoA knockout mice, implicating YAP in RHOA-regulated ISC function. EREG treatment or active β-catenin Catnb mutant expression rescues the RhoA KO ISC phenotypes. Thus, RHOA controls YAP-EREG signaling to regulate intestinal homeostasis and ISC regeneration.
Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
0 Communities
1 Members
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16 MeSH Terms
Neuronal activity drives FMRP- and HSPG-dependent matrix metalloproteinase function required for rapid synaptogenesis.
Dear ML, Shilts J, Broadie K
(2017) Sci Signal 10:
MeSH Terms: Animals, Disease Models, Animal, Drosophila Proteins, Drosophila melanogaster, Fragile X Syndrome, Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycans, Matrix Metalloproteinase 1, Matrix Metalloproteinase 2, Neuromuscular Junction, Neurons, Presynaptic Terminals, Proteoglycans, Wnt Signaling Pathway
Show Abstract · Added December 7, 2017
Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) functions modulate synapse formation and activity-dependent plasticity. Aberrant MMP activity is implicated in fragile X syndrome (FXS), a disease caused by the loss of the RNA-binding protein FMRP and characterized by neurological dysfunction and intellectual disability. Gene expression studies in suggest that Mmps cooperate with the heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) glypican co-receptor Dally-like protein (Dlp) to restrict trans-synaptic Wnt signaling and that synaptogenic defects in the fly model of FXS are alleviated by either inhibition of Mmp or genetic reduction of Dlp. We used the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) glutamatergic synapse to test activity-dependent Dlp and Mmp intersections in the context of FXS. We found that rapid, activity-dependent synaptic bouton formation depended on secreted Mmp1. Acute neuronal stimulation reduced the abundance of Mmp2 but increased that of both Mmp1 and Dlp, as well as enhanced the colocalization of Dlp and Mmp1 at the synapse. Dlp function promoted Mmp1 abundance, localization, and proteolytic activity around synapses. Dlp glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chains mediated this functional interaction with Mmp1. In the FXS fly model, activity-dependent increases in Mmp1 abundance and activity were lost but were restored by reducing the amount of synaptic Dlp. The data suggest that neuronal activity-induced, HSPG-dependent Mmp regulation drives activity-dependent synaptogenesis and that this is impaired in FXS. Thus, exploring this mechanism further may reveal therapeutic targets that have the potential to restore synaptogenesis in FXS patients.
Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.
1 Communities
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13 MeSH Terms
lncRNA MIR100HG-derived miR-100 and miR-125b mediate cetuximab resistance via Wnt/β-catenin signaling.
Lu Y, Zhao X, Liu Q, Li C, Graves-Deal R, Cao Z, Singh B, Franklin JL, Wang J, Hu H, Wei T, Yang M, Yeatman TJ, Lee E, Saito-Diaz K, Hinger S, Patton JG, Chung CH, Emmrich S, Klusmann JH, Fan D, Coffey RJ
(2017) Nat Med 23: 1331-1341
MeSH Terms: Antineoplastic Agents, Immunological, Cell Line, Tumor, Cetuximab, Disease Progression, Drug Resistance, Neoplasm, Epigenesis, Genetic, GATA6 Transcription Factor, Humans, MicroRNAs, RNA, Long Noncoding, Signal Transduction, Wnt Proteins, beta Catenin
Show Abstract · Added April 3, 2018
De novo and acquired resistance, which are largely attributed to genetic alterations, are barriers to effective anti-epidermal-growth-factor-receptor (EGFR) therapy. To generate cetuximab-resistant cells, we exposed cetuximab-sensitive colorectal cancer cells to cetuximab in three-dimensional culture. Using whole-exome sequencing and transcriptional profiling, we found that the long non-coding RNA MIR100HG and two embedded microRNAs, miR-100 and miR-125b, were overexpressed in the absence of known genetic events linked to cetuximab resistance. MIR100HG, miR-100 and miR-125b overexpression was also observed in cetuximab-resistant colorectal cancer and head and neck squamous cell cancer cell lines and in tumors from colorectal cancer patients that progressed on cetuximab. miR-100 and miR-125b coordinately repressed five Wnt/β-catenin negative regulators, resulting in increased Wnt signaling, and Wnt inhibition in cetuximab-resistant cells restored cetuximab responsiveness. Our results describe a double-negative feedback loop between MIR100HG and the transcription factor GATA6, whereby GATA6 represses MIR100HG, but this repression is relieved by miR-125b targeting of GATA6. These findings identify a clinically actionable, epigenetic cause of cetuximab resistance.
0 Communities
2 Members
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MeSH Terms
Differentiation of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells into Functional Lung Alveolar Epithelial Cells.
Jacob A, Morley M, Hawkins F, McCauley KB, Jean JC, Heins H, Na CL, Weaver TE, Vedaie M, Hurley K, Hinds A, Russo SJ, Kook S, Zacharias W, Ochs M, Traber K, Quinton LJ, Crane A, Davis BR, White FV, Wambach J, Whitsett JA, Cole FS, Morrisey EE, Guttentag SH, Beers MF, Kotton DN
(2017) Cell Stem Cell 21: 472-488.e10
MeSH Terms: Base Sequence, Cell Differentiation, Cell Line, Cell Proliferation, Cell Self Renewal, Cell Separation, Epithelial Cells, Gene Expression Profiling, Genes, Reporter, Humans, Lung Diseases, Models, Biological, Pluripotent Stem Cells, Pulmonary Alveoli, Pulmonary Surfactants, Thyroid Nuclear Factor 1, Time Factors, Wnt Proteins, Wnt Signaling Pathway
Show Abstract · Added April 1, 2019
Lung alveoli, which are unique to air-breathing organisms, have been challenging to generate from pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) in part because there are limited model systems available to provide the necessary developmental roadmaps for in vitro differentiation. Here we report the generation of alveolar epithelial type 2 cells (AEC2s), the facultative progenitors of lung alveoli, from human PSCs. Using multicolored fluorescent reporter lines, we track and purify human SFTPC+ alveolar progenitors as they emerge from endodermal precursors in response to stimulation of Wnt and FGF signaling. Purified PSC-derived SFTPC+ cells form monolayered epithelial "alveolospheres" in 3D cultures without the need for mesenchymal support, exhibit self-renewal capacity, and display additional AEC2 functional capacities. Footprint-free CRISPR-based gene correction of PSCs derived from patients carrying a homozygous surfactant mutation (SFTPB) restores surfactant processing in AEC2s. Thus, PSC-derived AEC2s provide a platform for disease modeling and future functional regeneration of the distal lung.
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
0 Communities
1 Members
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MeSH Terms
Loss of claudin-3 expression induces IL6/gp130/Stat3 signaling to promote colon cancer malignancy by hyperactivating Wnt/β-catenin signaling.
Ahmad R, Kumar B, Chen Z, Chen X, Müller D, Lele SM, Washington MK, Batra SK, Dhawan P, Singh AB
(2017) Oncogene 36: 6592-6604
MeSH Terms: Adenocarcinoma, Animals, Carcinogenesis, Cell Transformation, Neoplastic, Claudin-3, Colon, Colonic Neoplasms, Colorectal Neoplasms, Cytokine Receptor gp130, Epigenesis, Genetic, Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition, Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic, Humans, Intestinal Mucosa, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Permeability, STAT3 Transcription Factor, Up-Regulation, Wnt Signaling Pathway, beta Catenin
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
The hyperactivated Wnt/β-catenin signaling acts as a switch to induce epithelial to mesenchymal transition and promote colorectal cancer. However, due to its essential role in gut homeostasis, therapeutic targeting of this pathway has proven challenging. Additionally, IL-6/Stat-3 signaling, activated by microbial translocation through the dysregulated mucosal barrier in colon adenomas, facilitates the adenoma to adenocarcinomas transition. However, inter-dependence between these signaling pathways and key mucosal barrier components in regulating colon tumorigenesis and cancer progression remains unclear. In current study, we have discovered, using a comprehensive investigative regimen, a novel and tissue-specific role of claudin-3, a tight junction integral protein, in inhibiting colon cancer progression by serving as the common rheostat of Stat-3 and Wnt-signaling activation. Loss of claudin-3 also predicted poor patient survival. These findings however contrasted an upregulated claudin-3 expression in other cancer types and implicated role of the epigenetic regulation. Claudin-3-/- mice revealed dedifferentiated and leaky colonic epithelium, and developed invasive adenocarcinoma when subjected to colon cancer. Wnt-signaling hyperactivation, albeit in GSK-3β independent manner, differentiated colon cancer in claudin-3-/- mice versus WT-mice. Claudin-3 loss also upregulated the gp130/IL6/Stat3 signaling in colonic epithelium potentially assisted by infiltrating immune components. Genetic and pharmacological studies confirmed that claudin-3 loss induces Wnt/β-catenin activation, which is further exacerbated by Stat-3-activation and help promote colon cancer. Overall, these novel findings identify claudin-3 as a therapeutic target for inhibiting overactivation of Wnt-signaling to prevent CRC malignancy.
0 Communities
1 Members
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21 MeSH Terms
Inhibition of WNT signaling attenuates self-renewal of SHH-subgroup medulloblastoma.
Rodriguez-Blanco J, Pednekar L, Penas C, Li B, Martin V, Long J, Lee E, Weiss WA, Rodriguez C, Mehrdad N, Nguyen DM, Ayad NG, Rai P, Capobianco AJ, Robbins DJ
(2017) Oncogene 36: 6306-6314
MeSH Terms: Anilides, Animals, Cell Line, Tumor, Cerebellar Neoplasms, Disease Models, Animal, HEK293 Cells, Hedgehog Proteins, Humans, Male, Medulloblastoma, Mice, Mice, Transgenic, Pyridines, Random Allocation, SOXB1 Transcription Factors, Small Molecule Libraries, TRPC Cation Channels, Transfection, Tumor Suppressor Protein p53, Veratrum Alkaloids, Wnt Proteins, Wnt Signaling Pathway
Show Abstract · Added July 18, 2017
The SMOOTHENED inhibitor vismodegib is FDA approved for advanced basal cell carcinoma (BCC), and shows promise in clinical trials for SONIC HEDGEHOG (SHH)-subgroup medulloblastoma (MB) patients. Clinical experience with BCC patients shows that continuous exposure to vismodegib is necessary to prevent tumor recurrence, suggesting the existence of a vismodegib-resistant reservoir of tumor-propagating cells. We isolated such tumor-propagating cells from a mouse model of SHH-subgroup MB and grew them as sphere cultures. These cultures were enriched for the MB progenitor marker SOX2 and formed tumors in vivo. Moreover, while their ability to self-renew was resistant to SHH inhibitors, as has been previously suggested, this self-renewal was instead WNT-dependent. We show here that loss of Trp53 activates canonical WNT signaling in these SOX2-enriched cultures. Importantly, a small molecule WNT inhibitor was able to reduce the propagation and growth of SHH-subgroup MB in vivo, in an on-target manner, leading to increased survival. Our results imply that the tumor-propagating cells driving the growth of bulk SHH-dependent MB are themselves WNT dependent. Further, our data suggest combination therapy with WNT and SHH inhibitors as a therapeutic strategy in patients with SHH-subgroup MB, in order to decrease the tumor recurrence commonly observed in patients treated with vismodegib.
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22 MeSH Terms