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Breast Cancer Dormancy in Bone.
Clements ME, Johnson RW
(2019) Curr Osteoporos Rep 17: 353-361
MeSH Terms: Animals, Bone Marrow, Bone Neoplasms, Breast Neoplasms, Disease Models, Animal, Disease Progression, Female, Humans, Mice, Neoplasm Metastasis, Signal Transduction, Tumor Microenvironment
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
PURPOSE OF REVIEW - The goal of this review is to summarize recent experimental and clinical evidence for metastatic latency and the molecular mechanisms that regulate tumor dormancy in the bone.
RECENT FINDINGS - Tumor dormancy contributes to the progression of metastasis and thus has significant clinical implications for prognosis and treatment. Tumor-intrinsic signaling and specialized bone marrow niches play a pivotal role in determining the dormancy status of bone disseminated tumor cells. Experimental models have provided significant insight into the effects of the bone microenvironment on tumor cells; however, these models remain limited in their ability to study dormancy. Despite recent advances in the mechanistic understanding of how tumor cells remain dormant in the bone for prolonged periods of time, the signals that trigger spontaneous dormancy escape remain unclear. This review highlights the need for further investigation of mechanisms underlying tumor dormancy using clinically relevant models.
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12 MeSH Terms
Improved Prognosis and Increased Tumor-Infiltrating Lymphocytes in Patients Who Have SCLC With Neurologic Paraneoplastic Syndromes.
Iams WT, Shiuan E, Meador CB, Roth M, Bordeaux J, Vaupel C, Boyd KL, Summitt IB, Wang LL, Schneider JT, Warner JL, Zhao Z, Lovly CM
(2019) J Thorac Oncol 14: 1970-1981
MeSH Terms: Aged, B7-H1 Antigen, Biomarkers, Tumor, Female, Humans, Lung Neoplasms, Lymphocytes, Tumor-Infiltrating, Male, Middle Aged, Paraneoplastic Syndromes, Nervous System, Prognosis, Retrospective Studies, Small Cell Lung Carcinoma, Survival Rate, Tumor Microenvironment
Show Abstract · Added September 10, 2020
BACKGROUND - Approximately 10% of patients with SCLC develop a paraneoplastic syndrome (PNS). Neurologic PNS are thought to improve prognosis, which we hypothesized is related to increased tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes and immune recognition.
METHODS - We queried 2,512,042 medical records from a single institution to identify patients who have SCLC with and without PNS and performed manual, retrospective chart review. We then performed multiplexed fluorescence immunohistochemistry and automated quantitative analysis (AQUA Technology) on tumors to assess CD3, CD4, and CD8 T cell infiltrates and programmed death 1 (PD-1)/programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) interactions. T cell infiltrates and PD-1/PD-L1 interaction scores were compared among patients with neurologic PNS, endocrinologic PNS, and a control group without PNS. Clinical outcomes were analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox proportional hazards models.
RESULTS - We evaluated 145 SCLC patients: 55 with PNS (25 neurologic and 30 endocrinologic) and 90 controls. Patients with neurologic PNS experienced improved overall survival compared to patients with endocrinologic PNS and controls (median overall survival of 24 months versus 12 months versus 13 months, respectively). Of the 145 patients, we identified tumor tissue from 34 patients that was adequate for AQUA analysis. Among 37 specimens from these 34 patients, patients with neurologic PNS had increased T cell infiltrates (p = 0.033) and PD-1/PD-L1 interaction (p = 0.014) compared to tumors from patients with endocrinologic PNS or controls.
CONCLUSIONS - Tumor tissue from patients with SCLC with neurologic PNS showed increased tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes and PD-1/PD-L1 interaction consistent with an inflamed tumor microenvironment.
Copyright © 2019 International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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Resolution of Gastric Cancer-Promoting Inflammation: A Novel Strategy for Anti-cancer Therapy.
Piazuelo MB, Riechelmann RP, Wilson KT, Algood HMS
(2019) Curr Top Microbiol Immunol 421: 319-359
MeSH Terms: Cytokines, Gastric Mucosa, Helicobacter Infections, Helicobacter pylori, Humans, Inflammation, Stomach Neoplasms, Tumor Microenvironment
Show Abstract · Added June 6, 2019
The connection between inflammation and cancer was initially recognized by Rudolf Virchow in the nineteenth century. During the last decades, a large body of evidence has provided support to his hypothesis, and now inflammation is recognized as one of the hallmarks of cancer, both in etiopathogenesis and ongoing tumor growth. Infection with the pathogen Helicobacter pylori is the primary causal factor in 90% of gastric cancer (GC) cases. As we increase our understanding of how chronic inflammation develops in the stomach and contributes to carcinogenesis, there is increasing interest in targeting cancer-promoting inflammation as a strategy to treat GC. Moreover, once cancer develops and anti-cancer immune responses are suppressed, there is evidence of a substantial shift in the microenvironment and new targets for immune therapy emerge. In this chapter, we provide insight into inflammation-related factors, including T lymphocytes, macrophages, pro-inflammatory chemokines, and cytokines, which promote H. pylori-associated GC initiation and growth. While intervening with chronic inflammation is not a new practice in rheumatology or gastroenterology, this approach has not been fully explored for its potential to prevent carcinogenesis or to contribute to the treatment of GC. This review highlights current and possible strategies for therapeutic intervention including (i) targeting pro-inflammatory mediators, (ii) targeting growth factors and pathways involved in angiogenesis in the gastric tumor microenvironment, and (iii) enhancing anti-tumor immunity. In addition, we highlight a significant number of clinical trials and discuss the importance of individual tumor characterization toward offering personalized immune-related therapy.
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8 MeSH Terms
Papillary thyroid carcinoma behavior: clues in the tumor microenvironment.
Bergdorf K, Ferguson DC, Mehrad M, Ely K, Stricker T, Weiss VL
(2019) Endocr Relat Cancer 26: 601-614
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Biomarkers, Tumor, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, Lymphocytes, Tumor-Infiltrating, Male, Middle Aged, Mutation, Prognosis, Thyroid Cancer, Papillary, Thyroid Neoplasms, Tumor Microenvironment, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added April 15, 2019
The prevalence of thyroid carcinoma is increasing and represents the most common endocrine malignancy, with papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) being the most frequent subtype. The genetic alterations identified in PTCs fail to distinguish tumors with different clinical behaviors, such as extra-thyroidal extension and lymph node metastasis. We hypothesize that the immune microenvironment may play a critical role in tumor invasion and metastasis. Computational immunogenomic analysis was performed on 568 PTC samples in The Cancer Genome Atlas using CIBERSORT, TIMER and TIDE deconvolution analytic tools for characterizing immune cell composition. Immune cell infiltrates were correlated with histologic type, mutational type, tumor pathologic T stage and lymph node N stage. Dendritic cells (DCs) are highly associated with more locally advanced tumor T stage (T3/T4, odds ratio (OR) = 2.6, CI = 1.4-4.5, P = 5.4 × 10-4). Increased dendritic cells (OR = 3.4, CI = 1.9-6.3, P = 5.5 × 10-5) and neutrophils (OR = 10.5, CI = 2.7-44, P = 8.7 × 10-4) significantly correlate with lymph node metastasis. In addition, dendritic cells positively correlate with tall cell morphology (OR = 4.5, CI = 1.6-13, P = 4.9 × 10-3) and neutrophils negatively correlate with follicular morphology (OR = 1.3 × 10-3, CI = 5.3 × 10-5-0.031, P = 4.1 × 10-5). TIDE analysis indicates an immune-exclusive phenotype that may be mediated by increased galectin-3 found in PTCs. Thus, characterization of the PTC immune microenvironment using three computational platforms shows that specific immune cells correlate with mutational type, histologic type, local tumor extent and lymph node metastasis. Immunologic evaluation of PTCs may provide a better indication of biologic behavior, resulting in the improved diagnosis and treatment of thyroid cancer.
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17 MeSH Terms
Ventricular-Subventricular Zone Contact by Glioblastoma is Not Associated with Molecular Signatures in Bulk Tumor Data.
Mistry AM, Wooten DJ, Davis LT, Mobley BC, Quaranta V, Ihrie RA
(2019) Sci Rep 9: 1842
MeSH Terms: Adult, Brain Neoplasms, Cell Line, Tumor, DNA Methylation, Datasets as Topic, Female, Gene Expression Profiling, Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic, Glioblastoma, Humans, Lateral Ventricles, Male, Stem Cell Niche, Survival Analysis, Tumor Microenvironment
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2019
Whether patients with glioblastoma that contacts the ventricular-subventricular zone stem cell niche (VSVZ + GBM) have a distinct survival profile from VSVZ - GBM patients independent of other known predictors or molecular profiles is unclear. Using multivariate Cox analysis to adjust survival for widely-accepted predictors, hazard ratios (HRs) for overall (OS) and progression free (PFS) survival between VSVZ + GBM and VSVZ - GBM patients were calculated in 170 single-institution patients and 254 patients included in both The Cancer Genome (TCGA) and Imaging (TCIA) atlases. An adjusted, multivariable analysis revealed that VSVZ contact was independently associated with decreased survival in both datasets. TCGA molecular data analyses revealed that VSVZ contact by GBM was independent of mutational, DNA methylation, gene expression, and protein expression signatures in the bulk tumor. Therefore, while survival of GBM patients is independently stratified by VSVZ contact, with VSVZ + GBM patients displaying a poor prognosis, the VSVZ + GBMs do not possess a distinct molecular signature at the bulk sample level. Focused examination of the interplay between the VSVZ microenvironment and subsets of GBM cells proximal to this region is warranted.
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15 MeSH Terms
Beyond the message: advantages of snapshot proteomics with single-cell mass cytometry in solid tumors.
Mistry AM, Greenplate AR, Ihrie RA, Irish JM
(2019) FEBS J 286: 1523-1539
MeSH Terms: Humans, Image Cytometry, Mass Spectrometry, Neoplasms, Precision Medicine, Proteins, Proteomics, Sensitivity and Specificity, Signal Transduction, Single-Cell Analysis, Tumor Microenvironment
Show Abstract · Added December 16, 2018
Single-cell technologies that can quantify features of individual cells within a tumor are critical for treatment strategies aiming to target cancer cells while sparing or activating beneficial cells. Given that key players in protein networks are often the primary targets of precision oncology strategies, it is imperative to transcend the nucleic acid message and read cellular actions in human solid tumors. Here, we review the advantages of multiplex, single-cell mass cytometry in tissue and solid tumor investigations. Mass cytometry can quantitatively probe nearly any cellular feature or target. In discussing the ability of mass cytometry to reveal and characterize a broad spectrum of cell types, identify rare cells, and study functional behavior through protein signaling networks in millions of individual cells from a tumor, this review surveys publications of scientific advances in solid tumor biology made with the aid of mass cytometry. Advances discussed include functional identification of rare tumor and tumor-infiltrating immune cells and dissection of cellular mechanisms of immunotherapy in solid tumors and the periphery. The review concludes by highlighting ways to incorporate single-cell mass cytometry in solid tumor precision oncology efforts and rapidly developing cytometry techniques for quantifying cell location and sequenced nucleic acids.
© 2018 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.
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11 MeSH Terms
Treatment-Induced Tumor Cell Apoptosis and Secondary Necrosis Drive Tumor Progression in the Residual Tumor Microenvironment through MerTK and IDO1.
Werfel TA, Elion DL, Rahman B, Hicks DJ, Sanchez V, Gonzales-Ericsson PI, Nixon MJ, James JL, Balko JM, Scherle PA, Koblish HK, Cook RS
(2019) Cancer Res 79: 171-182
MeSH Terms: Animals, Antineoplastic Agents, Apoptosis, Female, Indoleamine-Pyrrole 2,3,-Dioxygenase, Inflammation, Lapatinib, Lung Neoplasms, Macrophages, Mammary Neoplasms, Experimental, Mice, Necrosis, Phagocytosis, Receptor, ErbB-2, T-Lymphocytes, Regulatory, Tumor Microenvironment, c-Mer Tyrosine Kinase
Show Abstract · Added April 15, 2019
Efferocytosis is the process by which apoptotic cells are cleared from tissue by phagocytic cells. The removal of apoptotic cells prevents them from undergoing secondary necrosis and releasing their inflammation-inducing intracellular contents. Efferocytosis also limits tissue damage by increasing immunosuppressive cytokines and leukocytes and maintains tissue homeostasis by promoting tolerance to antigens derived from apoptotic cells. Thus, tumor cell efferocytosis following cytotoxic cancer treatment could impart tolerance to tumor cells evading treatment-induced apoptosis with deleterious consequences in tumor residual disease. We report here that efferocytosis cleared apoptotic tumor cells in residual disease of lapatinib-treated HER2 mammary tumors in MMTV-Neu mice, increased immunosuppressive cytokines, myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC), and regulatory T cells (Treg). Blockade of efferocytosis induced secondary necrosis of apoptotic cells, but failed to prevent increased tumor MDSCs, Treg, and immunosuppressive cytokines. We found that efferocytosis stimulated expression of IFN-γ, which stimulated the expression of indoleamine-2,3-dioxegenase (IDO) 1, an immune regulator known for driving maternal-fetal antigen tolerance. Combined inhibition of efferocytosis and IDO1 in tumor residual disease decreased apoptotic cell- and necrotic cell-induced immunosuppressive phenotypes, blocked tumor metastasis, and caused tumor regression in 60% of MMTV-Neu mice. This suggests that apoptotic and necrotic tumor cells, via efferocytosis and IDO1, respectively, promote tumor 'homeostasis' and progression. SIGNIFICANCE: These findings show in a model of HER2 breast cancer that necrosis secondary to impaired efferocytosis activates IDO1 to drive immunosuppression and tumor progression.
©2018 American Association for Cancer Research.
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17 MeSH Terms
Mechanical Forces in Tumor Angiogenesis.
Zanotelli MR, Reinhart-King CA
(2018) Adv Exp Med Biol 1092: 91-112
MeSH Terms: Biomechanical Phenomena, Endothelial Cells, Extracellular Fluid, Humans, Neoplasms, Neovascularization, Pathologic, Tumor Microenvironment
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2019
A defining hallmark of cancer and cancer development is upregulated angiogenesis. The vasculature formed in tumors is structurally abnormal, not organized in the conventional hierarchical arrangement, and more permeable than normal vasculature. These features contribute to leaky, tortuous, and dilated blood vessels, which act to create heterogeneous blood flow, compression of vessels, and elevated interstitial fluid pressure. As such, abnormalities in the tumor vasculature not only affect the delivery of nutrients and oxygen to the tumor, but also contribute to creating an abnormal tumor microenvironment that further promotes tumorigenesis. The role of chemical signaling events in mediating tumor angiogenesis has been well researched; however, the relative contribution of physical cues and mechanical regulation of tumor angiogenesis is less understood. Growing research indicates that the physical microenvironment plays a significant role in tumor progression and promoting abnormal tumor vasculature. Here, we review how mechanical cues found in the tumor microenvironment promote aberrant tumor angiogenesis. Specifically, we discuss the influence of matrix stiffness and mechanical stresses in tumor tissue on tumor vasculature, as well as the mechanosensory pathways utilized by endothelial cells to respond to the physical cues found in the tumor microenvironment. We also discuss the impact of the resulting aberrant tumor vasculature on tumor progression and therapeutic treatment.
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7 MeSH Terms
Therapeutically Active RIG-I Agonist Induces Immunogenic Tumor Cell Killing in Breast Cancers.
Elion DL, Jacobson ME, Hicks DJ, Rahman B, Sanchez V, Gonzales-Ericsson PI, Fedorova O, Pyle AM, Wilson JT, Cook RS
(2018) Cancer Res 78: 6183-6195
MeSH Terms: Animals, Apoptosis, Breast Neoplasms, Cell Line, Tumor, Cytokines, DEAD Box Protein 58, Female, Gene Expression Profiling, Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic, Humans, Immunity, Innate, Immunotherapy, Lymphocytes, Tumor-Infiltrating, MCF-7 Cells, Mice, Mice, Inbred BALB C, Mice, Nude, Nanoparticles, Neoplasm Metastasis, Neoplasms, Pyroptosis, Signal Transduction, Tumor Microenvironment
Show Abstract · Added April 15, 2019
Cancer immunotherapies that remove checkpoint restraints on adaptive immunity are gaining clinical momentum but have not achieved widespread success in breast cancers, a tumor type considered poorly immunogenic and which harbors a decreased presence of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes. Approaches that activate innate immunity in breast cancer cells and the tumor microenvironment are of increasing interest, based on their ability to induce immunogenic tumor cell death, type I IFNs, and lymphocyte-recruiting chemokines. In agreement with reports in other cancers, we observe loss, downregulation, or mutation of the innate viral nucleotide sensor retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I/) in only 1% of clinical breast cancers, suggesting potentially widespread applicability for therapeutic RIG-I agonists that activate innate immunity. This was tested using an engineered RIG-I agonist in a breast cancer cell panel representing each of three major clinical breast cancer subtypes. Treatment with RIG-I agonist resulted in upregulation and mitochondrial localization of RIG-I and activation of proinflammatory transcription factors STAT1 and NF-κB. RIG-I agonist triggered the extrinsic apoptosis pathway and pyroptosis, a highly immunogenic form of cell death in breast cancer cells. RIG-I agonist also induced expression of lymphocyte-recruiting chemokines and type I IFN, confirming that cell death and cytokine modulation occur in a tumor cell-intrinsic manner. Importantly, RIG-I activation in breast tumors increased tumor lymphocytes and decreased tumor growth and metastasis. Overall, these findings demonstrate successful therapeutic delivery of a synthetic RIG-I agonist to induce tumor cell killing and to modulate the tumor microenvironment These findings describe the first in vivo delivery of RIG-I mimetics to tumors, demonstrating a potent immunogenic and therapeutic effect in the context of otherwise poorly immunogenic breast cancers. .
©2018 American Association for Cancer Research.
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23 MeSH Terms
Efferocytosis in the tumor microenvironment.
Werfel TA, Cook RS
(2018) Semin Immunopathol 40: 545-554
MeSH Terms: Animals, Apoptosis, Biomarkers, Humans, Macrophages, Neoplasms, Phagocytes, Phagocytosis, Tumor Microenvironment
Show Abstract · Added April 15, 2019
Within the course of a single minute, millions of cells in the human body will undergo programmed cell death in response to physiological or pathological cues. The diminished energetic capacity of an apoptotic cell renders the cell incapable of sustaining plasma membrane integrity. Under these circumstances, intracellular contents that might leak into the surrounding tissue microenvironment, a process referred to as secondary necrosis, could induce inflammation and tissue damage. Remarkably, in most cases of physiologically rendered apoptotic cell death, inflammation is avoided because a mechanism to swiftly remove apoptotic cells from the tissue prior to their secondary necrosis becomes activated. This mechanism, referred to as efferocytosis, uses phagocytes to precisely identify and engulf neighboring apoptotic cells. In doing so, efferocytosis mantains tissue homeostasis that would otherwise be disrupted by normal cellular turnover and exacerbated further when the burden of apoptotic cells becomes elevated due to disease or insult. Efferocytosis also supports the resolution of inflammation, restoring tissue homesostasis. The importance of efferocytosis in health and disease underlies the increasing research efforts to understand the mechanisms by which efferocytosis occurs, and how a failure in the efferocytic machinery contributes to diseases, or conversely, how cancers effectively use the existing efferocytic machinery to generate a tumor-tolerant, immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. We discuss herein the molecular mechanisms of efferocytosis, how the process of efferocytosis might support a tumor 'wound healing' phenotype, and efforts to target efferocytosis as an adjunct to existing tumor treatments.
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