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Gene network transitions in embryos depend upon interactions between a pioneer transcription factor and core histones.
Iwafuchi M, Cuesta I, Donahue G, Takenaka N, Osipovich AB, Magnuson MA, Roder H, Seeholzer SH, Santisteban P, Zaret KS
(2020) Nat Genet 52: 418-427
MeSH Terms: Amino Acid Sequence, Animals, Cell Line, Chromatin, DNA, Female, Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental, Gene Regulatory Networks, Histones, Humans, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Nucleosomes, Transcription Factors, Transcription, Genetic
Show Abstract · Added April 7, 2020
Gene network transitions in embryos and other fate-changing contexts involve combinations of transcription factors. A subset of fate-changing transcription factors act as pioneers; they scan and target nucleosomal DNA and initiate cooperative events that can open the local chromatin. However, a gap has remained in understanding how molecular interactions with the nucleosome contribute to the chromatin-opening phenomenon. Here we identified a short α-helical region, conserved among FOXA pioneer factors, that interacts with core histones and contributes to chromatin opening in vitro. The same domain is involved in chromatin opening in early mouse embryos for normal development. Thus, local opening of chromatin by interactions between pioneer factors and core histones promotes genetic programming.
1 Communities
3 Members
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15 MeSH Terms
Sox6 as a new modulator of renin expression in the kidney.
Saleem M, Hodgkinson CP, Xiao L, Gimenez-Bastida JA, Rasmussen ML, Foss J, Payne AJ, Mirotsou M, Gama V, Dzau VJ, Gomez JA
(2020) Am J Physiol Renal Physiol 318: F285-F297
MeSH Terms: Animals, Arterioles, Blood Pressure, Cell Differentiation, Cell Proliferation, Cells, Cultured, Diet, Sodium-Restricted, Diuretics, Furosemide, Gene Expression Regulation, Juxtaglomerular Apparatus, Male, Mesenchymal Stem Cells, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Muscle, Smooth, Vascular, Myocytes, Smooth Muscle, Renin, SOXD Transcription Factors, Signal Transduction
Show Abstract · Added August 24, 2020
Juxtaglomerular (JG) cells, major sources of renin, differentiate from metanephric mesenchymal cells that give rise to JG cells or a subset of smooth muscle cells of the renal afferent arteriole. During periods of dehydration and salt deprivation, renal mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) differentiate from JG cells. JG cells undergo expansion and smooth muscle cells redifferentiate to express renin along the afferent arteriole. Gene expression profiling comparing resident renal MSCs with JG cells indicates that the transcription factor Sox6 is highly expressed in JG cells in the adult kidney. In vitro, loss of Sox6 expression reduces differentiation of renal MSCs to renin-producing cells. In vivo, Sox6 expression is upregulated after a low-Na diet and furosemide. Importantly, knockout of Sox6 in Ren1d+ cells halts the increase in renin-expressing cells normally seen during a low-Na diet and furosemide as well as the typical increase in renin. Furthermore, Sox6 ablation in renin-expressing cells halts the recruitment of smooth muscle cells along the afferent arteriole, which normally express renin under these conditions. These results support a previously undefined role for Sox6 in renin expression.
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MeSH Terms
miR-302a Inhibits Metastasis and Cetuximab Resistance in Colorectal Cancer by Targeting NFIB and CD44.
Sun L, Fang Y, Wang X, Han Y, Du F, Li C, Hu H, Liu H, Liu Q, Wang J, Liang J, Chen P, Yang H, Nie Y, Wu K, Fan D, Coffey RJ, Lu Y, Zhao X, Wang X
(2019) Theranostics 9: 8409-8425
MeSH Terms: Caco-2 Cells, Cetuximab, Colorectal Neoplasms, Drug Resistance, Neoplasm, Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic, HCT116 Cells, Humans, Hyaluronan Receptors, In Vitro Techniques, MicroRNAs, NFI Transcription Factors, Neoplasm Metastasis, Signal Transduction
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
: Metastasis and drug resistance contribute substantially to the poor prognosis of colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. However, the epigenetic regulatory mechanisms by which CRC develops metastatic and drug-resistant characteristics remain unclear. This study aimed to investigate the role of miR-302a in the metastasis and molecular-targeted drug resistance of CRC and elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms. : miR-302a expression in CRC cell lines and patient tissue microarrays was analyzed by qPCR and fluorescence hybridization. The roles of miR-302a in metastasis and cetuximab (CTX) resistance were evaluated both and . Bioinformatic prediction algorithms and luciferase reporter assays were performed to identify the miR-302a binding regions in the NFIB and CD44 3'-UTRs. A chromatin immunoprecipitation assay was performed to examine NFIB occupancy in the ITGA6 promoter region. Immunoblotting was performed to identify the EGFR-mediated pathways altered by miR-302a. : miR-302a expression was frequently reduced in CRC cells and tissues, especially in CTX-resistant cells and patient-derived xenografts. The decreased miR-302a levels correlated with poor overall CRC patient survival. miR-302a overexpression inhibited metastasis and restored CTX responsiveness in CRC cells, whereas miR-302a silencing exerted the opposite effects. NFIB and CD44 were identified as novel targets of miR-302a. miR-302a inhibited the metastasis-promoting effect of NFIB that physiologically activates ITGA6 transcription. miR-302a restored CTX responsiveness by suppressing CD44-induced cancer stem cell-like properties and EGFR-mediated MAPK and AKT signaling. These results are consistent with clinical observations indicating that miR-302a expression is inversely correlated with the expression of its targets in CRC specimens. : Our findings show that miR-302a acts as a multifaceted regulator of CRC metastasis and CTX resistance by targeting NFIB and CD44, respectively. Our study implicates miR-302a as a candidate prognostic predictor and a therapeutic agent in CRC.
© The author(s).
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13 MeSH Terms
Systems-level network modeling of Small Cell Lung Cancer subtypes identifies master regulators and destabilizers.
Wooten DJ, Groves SM, Tyson DR, Liu Q, Lim JS, Albert R, Lopez CF, Sage J, Quaranta V
(2019) PLoS Comput Biol 15: e1007343
MeSH Terms: Algorithms, Animals, Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factors, Bayes Theorem, Cell Line, Tumor, Cluster Analysis, Databases, Genetic, Drug Resistance, Neoplasm, Gene Expression, Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic, Gene Ontology, Gene Regulatory Networks, Humans, Mice, Models, Theoretical, Small Cell Lung Carcinoma, Systems Analysis, Transcription Factors
Show Abstract · Added March 30, 2020
Adopting a systems approach, we devise a general workflow to define actionable subtypes in human cancers. Applied to small cell lung cancer (SCLC), the workflow identifies four subtypes based on global gene expression patterns and ontologies. Three correspond to known subtypes (SCLC-A, SCLC-N, and SCLC-Y), while the fourth is a previously undescribed ASCL1+ neuroendocrine variant (NEv2, or SCLC-A2). Tumor deconvolution with subtype gene signatures shows that all of the subtypes are detectable in varying proportions in human and mouse tumors. To understand how multiple stable subtypes can arise within a tumor, we infer a network of transcription factors and develop BooleaBayes, a minimally-constrained Boolean rule-fitting approach. In silico perturbations of the network identify master regulators and destabilizers of its attractors. Specific to NEv2, BooleaBayes predicts ELF3 and NR0B1 as master regulators of the subtype, and TCF3 as a master destabilizer. Since the four subtypes exhibit differential drug sensitivity, with NEv2 consistently least sensitive, these findings may lead to actionable therapeutic strategies that consider SCLC intratumoral heterogeneity. Our systems-level approach should generalize to other cancer types.
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MeSH Terms
Bacterial Pathogens Hijack the Innate Immune Response by Activation of the Reverse Transsulfuration Pathway.
Gobert AP, Latour YL, Asim M, Finley JL, Verriere TG, Barry DP, Milne GL, Luis PB, Schneider C, Rivera ES, Lindsey-Rose K, Schey KL, Delgado AG, Sierra JC, Piazuelo MB, Wilson KT
(2019) mBio 10:
MeSH Terms: Animals, Bacteria, Gene Silencing, Helicobacter pylori, Histones, Humans, Immune Evasion, Immunity, Innate, Immunoglobulins, Macrophages, Male, Metabolic Networks and Pathways, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Nitric Oxide Synthase Type II, Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases, Polyamines, RAW 264.7 Cells, Spermidine, Spermine, Sulfur, Transcription Factors
Show Abstract · Added November 1, 2019
The reverse transsulfuration pathway is the major route for the metabolism of sulfur-containing amino acids. The role of this metabolic pathway in macrophage response and function is unknown. We show that the enzyme cystathionine γ-lyase (CTH) is induced in macrophages infected with pathogenic bacteria through signaling involving phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/MTOR and the transcription factor SP1. This results in the synthesis of cystathionine, which facilitates the survival of pathogens within myeloid cells. Our data demonstrate that the expression of CTH leads to defective macrophage activation by (i) dysregulation of polyamine metabolism by depletion of -adenosylmethionine, resulting in immunosuppressive putrescine accumulation and inhibition of spermidine and spermine synthesis, and (ii) increased histone H3K9, H3K27, and H3K36 di/trimethylation, which is associated with gene expression silencing. Thus, CTH is a pivotal enzyme of the innate immune response that disrupts host defense. The induction of the reverse transsulfuration pathway by bacterial pathogens can be considered an unrecognized mechanism for immune escape. Macrophages are professional immune cells that ingest and kill microbes. In this study, we show that different pathogenic bacteria induce the expression of cystathionine γ-lyase (CTH) in macrophages. This enzyme is involved in a metabolic pathway called the reverse transsulfuration pathway, which leads to the production of numerous metabolites, including cystathionine. Phagocytized bacteria use cystathionine to better survive in macrophages. In addition, the induction of CTH results in dysregulation of the metabolism of polyamines, which in turn dampens the proinflammatory response of macrophages. In conclusion, pathogenic bacteria can evade the host immune response by inducing CTH in macrophages.
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22 MeSH Terms
Genome-Wide Association Study of Apparent Treatment-Resistant Hypertension in the CHARGE Consortium: The CHARGE Pharmacogenetics Working Group.
Irvin MR, Sitlani CM, Floyd JS, Psaty BM, Bis JC, Wiggins KL, Whitsel EA, Sturmer T, Stewart J, Raffield L, Sun F, Liu CT, Xu H, Cupples AL, Tanner RM, Rossing P, Smith A, Zilhão NR, Launer LJ, Noordam R, Rotter JI, Yao J, Li X, Guo X, Limdi N, Sundaresan A, Lange L, Correa A, Stott DJ, Ford I, Jukema JW, Gudnason V, Mook-Kanamori DO, Trompet S, Palmas W, Warren HR, Hellwege JN, Giri A, O'donnell C, Hung AM, Edwards TL, Ahluwalia TS, Arnett DK, Avery CL
(2019) Am J Hypertens 32: 1146-1153
MeSH Terms: African Americans, Aged, Antihypertensive Agents, Blood Pressure, Case-Control Studies, DNA (Cytosine-5-)-Methyltransferases, DNA-Binding Proteins, Drug Resistance, Dystrophin-Associated Proteins, Europe, European Continental Ancestry Group, Female, Genetic Loci, Genome-Wide Association Study, Humans, Hypertension, Male, Middle Aged, Myosin Heavy Chains, Myosin Type V, Neuropeptides, Pharmacogenetics, Pharmacogenomic Variants, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Risk Assessment, Risk Factors, Transcription Factors, United States
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
BACKGROUND - Only a handful of genetic discovery efforts in apparent treatment-resistant hypertension (aTRH) have been described.
METHODS - We conducted a case-control genome-wide association study of aTRH among persons treated for hypertension, using data from 10 cohorts of European ancestry (EA) and 5 cohorts of African ancestry (AA). Cases were treated with 3 different antihypertensive medication classes and had blood pressure (BP) above goal (systolic BP ≥ 140 mm Hg and/or diastolic BP ≥ 90 mm Hg) or 4 or more medication classes regardless of BP control (nEA = 931, nAA = 228). Both a normotensive control group and a treatment-responsive control group were considered in separate analyses. Normotensive controls were untreated (nEA = 14,210, nAA = 2,480) and had systolic BP/diastolic BP < 140/90 mm Hg. Treatment-responsive controls (nEA = 5,266, nAA = 1,817) had BP at goal (<140/90 mm Hg), while treated with one antihypertensive medication class. Individual cohorts used logistic regression with adjustment for age, sex, study site, and principal components for ancestry to examine the association of single-nucleotide polymorphisms with case-control status. Inverse variance-weighted fixed-effects meta-analyses were carried out using METAL.
RESULTS - The known hypertension locus, CASZ1, was a top finding among EAs (P = 1.1 × 10-8) and in the race-combined analysis (P = 1.5 × 10-9) using the normotensive control group (rs12046278, odds ratio = 0.71 (95% confidence interval: 0.6-0.8)). Single-nucleotide polymorphisms in this locus were robustly replicated in the Million Veterans Program (MVP) study in consideration of a treatment-responsive control group. There were no statistically significant findings for the discovery analyses including treatment-responsive controls.
CONCLUSION - This genomic discovery effort for aTRH identified CASZ1 as an aTRH risk locus.
© American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd 2019. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.
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28 MeSH Terms
Prevention and Reversion of Pancreatic Tumorigenesis through a Differentiation-Based Mechanism.
Krah NM, Narayanan SM, Yugawa DE, Straley JA, Wright CVE, MacDonald RJ, Murtaugh LC
(2019) Dev Cell 50: 744-754.e4
MeSH Terms: Acinar Cells, Animals, Carcinogenesis, Cell Differentiation, Cell Line, Tumor, Cell Proliferation, Clone Cells, Disease Models, Animal, Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic, Humans, Inflammation, Mice, Pancreatic Neoplasms, Pancreatitis, Phenotype, Proto-Oncogene Proteins p21(ras), Signal Transduction, Transcription Factors
Show Abstract · Added September 3, 2019
Activating mutations in Kras are nearly ubiquitous in human pancreatic cancer and initiate precancerous pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanINs) when induced in mouse acinar cells. PanINs normally take months to form but are accelerated by deletion of acinar cell differentiation factors such as Ptf1a, suggesting that loss of cell identity is rate limiting for pancreatic tumor initiation. Using a genetic mouse model that allows for independent control of oncogenic Kras and Ptf1a expression, we demonstrate that sustained Ptf1a is sufficient to prevent Kras-driven tumorigenesis, even in the presence of tumor-promoting inflammation. Furthermore, reintroducing Ptf1a into established PanINs reverts them to quiescent acinar cells in vivo. Similarly, Ptf1a re-expression in human pancreatic cancer cells inhibits their growth and colony-forming ability. Our results suggest that reactivation of an endogenous differentiation program can prevent and reverse oncogene-driven transformation in cells harboring tumor-driving mutations, introducing a potential paradigm for solid tumor prevention and treatment.
Copyright © 2019 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
1 Communities
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18 MeSH Terms
The Pdx1-Bound Swi/Snf Chromatin Remodeling Complex Regulates Pancreatic Progenitor Cell Proliferation and Mature Islet β-Cell Function.
Spaeth JM, Liu JH, Peters D, Guo M, Osipovich AB, Mohammadi F, Roy N, Bhushan A, Magnuson MA, Hebrok M, Wright CVE, Stein R
(2019) Diabetes 68: 1806-1818
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cell Proliferation, Chromatin Assembly and Disassembly, DNA Helicases, Gene Expression Regulation, Glucose Intolerance, Homeodomain Proteins, Insulin, Insulin-Secreting Cells, Mice, Mice, Transgenic, Nuclear Proteins, Pancreas, Trans-Activators, Transcription Factors
Show Abstract · Added June 28, 2019
Transcription factors positively and/or negatively impact gene expression by recruiting coregulatory factors, which interact through protein-protein binding. Here we demonstrate that mouse pancreas size and islet β-cell function are controlled by the ATP-dependent Swi/Snf chromatin remodeling coregulatory complex that physically associates with Pdx1, a diabetes-linked transcription factor essential to pancreatic morphogenesis and adult islet cell function and maintenance. Early embryonic deletion of just the Swi/Snf Brg1 ATPase subunit reduced multipotent pancreatic progenitor cell proliferation and resulted in pancreas hypoplasia. In contrast, removal of both Swi/Snf ATPase subunits, Brg1 and Brm, was necessary to compromise adult islet β-cell activity, which included whole-animal glucose intolerance, hyperglycemia, and impaired insulin secretion. Notably, lineage-tracing analysis revealed Swi/Snf-deficient β-cells lost the ability to produce the mRNAs for and other key metabolic genes without effecting the expression of many essential islet-enriched transcription factors. Swi/Snf was necessary for Pdx1 to bind to the gene enhancer, demonstrating the importance of this association in mediating chromatin accessibility. These results illustrate how fundamental the Pdx1:Swi/Snf coregulator complex is in the pancreas, and we discuss how disrupting their association could influence type 1 and type 2 diabetes susceptibility.
© 2019 by the American Diabetes Association.
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3 Members
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15 MeSH Terms
Quantitative Interactome Proteomics Reveals a Molecular Basis for ATF6-Dependent Regulation of a Destabilized Amyloidogenic Protein.
Plate L, Rius B, Nguyen B, Genereux JC, Kelly JW, Wiseman RL
(2019) Cell Chem Biol 26: 913-925.e4
MeSH Terms: Activating Transcription Factor 6, Amyloidogenic Proteins, Amyloidosis, Endoplasmic Reticulum, Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress, HEK293 Cells, Humans, Molecular Chaperones, Proteomics, Transcription Factors, Unfolded Protein Response
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
Activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR)-associated transcription factor ATF6 has emerged as a promising strategy to reduce the secretion and subsequent toxic aggregation of destabilized, amyloidogenic proteins implicated in systemic amyloid diseases. However, the molecular mechanism by which ATF6 activation reduces the secretion of amyloidogenic proteins remains poorly defined. We employ a quantitative interactomics platform to define how ATF6 activation reduces secretion of a destabilized, amyloidogenic immunoglobulin light chain (LC) associated with light-chain amyloidosis (AL). Using this platform, we show that ATF6 activation increases the targeting of this destabilized LC to a subset of pro-folding ER proteostasis factors that retains the amyloidogenic LC within the ER, preventing its secretion. Our results define a molecular basis for the ATF6-dependent reduction in destabilized LC secretion and highlight the advantage for targeting this UPR-associated transcription factor to reduce secretion of destabilized, amyloidogenic proteins implicated in AL and related systemic amyloid diseases.
Copyright © 2019 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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1 Members
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11 MeSH Terms
Myocardial differentiation is dependent upon endocardial signaling during early cardiogenesis .
Saint-Jean L, Barkas N, Harmelink C, Tompkins KL, Oakey RJ, Baldwin HS
(2019) Development 146:
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cell Differentiation, Endocardium, Female, Flow Cytometry, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Microscopy, Fluorescence, Myocardium, NFATC Transcription Factors, Organogenesis, Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction, Signal Transduction
Show Abstract · Added November 25, 2019
The endocardium interacts with the myocardium to promote proliferation and morphogenesis during the later stages of heart development. However, the role of the endocardium in early cardiac ontogeny remains under-explored. Given the shared origin, subsequent juxtaposition, and essential cell-cell interactions of endocardial and myocardial cells throughout heart development, we hypothesized that paracrine signaling from the endocardium to the myocardium is crucial for initiating early differentiation of myocardial cells. To test this, we generated an , endocardial-specific ablation model using the diphtheria toxin receptor under the regulatory elements of the genomic locus (). Early treatment of mouse embryoid bodies with diphtheria toxin efficiently ablated endocardial cells, which significantly attenuated the percentage of beating EBs in culture and expression of early and late myocardial differentiation markers. The addition of Bmp2 during endocardial ablation partially rescued myocyte differentiation, maturation and function. Therefore, we conclude that early stages of myocardial differentiation rely on endocardial paracrine signaling mediated in part by Bmp2. Our findings provide novel insight into early endocardial-myocardial interactions that can be explored to promote early myocardial development and growth.
© 2019. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.
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14 MeSH Terms