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Predictors of recurrence in remitted late-life depression.
Deng Y, McQuoid DR, Potter GG, Steffens DC, Albert K, Riddle M, Beyer JL, Taylor WD
(2018) Depress Anxiety 35: 658-667
MeSH Terms: Activities of Daily Living, Age of Onset, Aged, Antidepressive Agents, Brain, Comorbidity, Depressive Disorder, Major, Female, Humans, Longitudinal Studies, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Male, Middle Aged, Neuropsychological Tests, Prognosis, Proportional Hazards Models, Recurrence, Remission Induction, Sex Factors, Social Support, Stress, Psychological, Suicidal Ideation
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
BACKGROUND - Late-life depression (LLD) is associated with a fragile antidepressant response and high recurrence risk. This study examined what measures predict recurrence in remitted LLD.
METHODS - Individuals of age 60 years or older with a Diagnostic and Statistical Manual - IV (DSM-IV) diagnosis of major depressive disorder were enrolled in the neurocognitive outcomes of depression in the elderly study. Participants received manualized antidepressant treatment and were followed longitudinally for an average of 5 years. Study analyses included participants who remitted. Measures included demographic and clinical measures, medical comorbidity, disability, life stress, social support, and neuropsychological testing. A subset underwent structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).
RESULTS - Of 241 remitted elders, approximately over 4 years, 137 (56.8%) experienced recurrence and 104 (43.2%) maintained remission. In the final model, greater recurrence risk was associated with female sex (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.536; confidence interval [CI] = 1.027-2.297), younger age of onset (HR = 0.990; CI = 0.981-0.999), higher perceived stress (HR = 1.121; CI = 1.022-1.229), disability (HR = 1.060; CI = 1.005-1.119), and less support with activities (HR = 0.885; CI = 0.812-0.963). Recurrence risk was also associated with higher Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) scores prior to censoring (HR = 1.081; CI = 1.033-1.131) and baseline symptoms of suicidal thoughts by MADRS (HR = 1.175; CI = 1.002-1.377) and sadness by Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression (HR = 1.302; CI, 1.080-1.569). Sex, age of onset, and suicidal thoughts were no longer associated with recurrence in a model incorporating report of multiple prior episodes (HR = 2.107; CI = 1.252-3.548). Neither neuropsychological test performance nor MRI measures of aging pathology were associated with recurrence.
CONCLUSIONS - Over half of the depressed elders who remitted experienced recurrence, mostly within 2 years. Multiple clinical and environmental measures predict recurrence risk. Work is needed to develop instruments that stratify risk.
© 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
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An Innovative Program to Support Gender Equity and Success in Academic Medicine: Early Experiences From the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation's Fund to Retain Clinical Scientists.
Jagsi R, Jones RD, Griffith KA, Brady KT, Brown AJ, Davis RD, Drake AF, Ford D, Fraser VJ, Hartmann KE, Hochman JS, Girdler S, Libby AM, Mangurian C, Regensteiner JG, Yonkers K, Escobar-Alvarez S, Myers ER
(2018) Ann Intern Med 169: 128-130
MeSH Terms: Biomedical Research, Female, Foundations, Humans, Male, Research Personnel, Research Support as Topic, Sexism, United States
Added February 21, 2019
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9 MeSH Terms
Development of an automated phenotyping algorithm for hepatorenal syndrome.
Koola JD, Davis SE, Al-Nimri O, Parr SK, Fabbri D, Malin BA, Ho SB, Matheny ME
(2018) J Biomed Inform 80: 87-95
MeSH Terms: Acute Kidney Injury, Aged, Algorithms, Diagnosis, Computer-Assisted, Electronic Health Records, Female, Hepatorenal Syndrome, Humans, Liver Cirrhosis, Male, Middle Aged, Natural Language Processing, Odds Ratio, Phenotype, ROC Curve, Retrospective Studies, Support Vector Machine
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2018
OBJECTIVE - Hepatorenal Syndrome (HRS) is a devastating form of acute kidney injury (AKI) in advanced liver disease patients with high morbidity and mortality, but phenotyping algorithms have not yet been developed using large electronic health record (EHR) databases. We evaluated and compared multiple phenotyping methods to achieve an accurate algorithm for HRS identification.
MATERIALS AND METHODS - A national retrospective cohort of patients with cirrhosis and AKI admitted to 124 Veterans Affairs hospitals was assembled from electronic health record data collected from 2005 to 2013. AKI was defined by the Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes criteria. Five hundred and four hospitalizations were selected for manual chart review and served as the gold standard. Electronic Health Record based predictors were identified using structured and free text clinical data, subjected through NLP from the clinical Text Analysis Knowledge Extraction System. We explored several dimension reduction techniques for the NLP data, including newer high-throughput phenotyping and word embedding methods, and ascertained their effectiveness in identifying the phenotype without structured predictor variables. With the combined structured and NLP variables, we analyzed five phenotyping algorithms: penalized logistic regression, naïve Bayes, support vector machines, random forest, and gradient boosting. Calibration and discrimination metrics were calculated using 100 bootstrap iterations. In the final model, we report odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals.
RESULTS - The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) for the different models ranged from 0.73 to 0.93; with penalized logistic regression having the best discriminatory performance. Calibration for logistic regression was modest, but gradient boosting and support vector machines were superior. NLP identified 6985 variables; a priori variable selection performed similarly to dimensionality reduction using high-throughput phenotyping and semantic similarity informed clustering (AUC of 0.81 - 0.82).
CONCLUSION - This study demonstrated improved phenotyping of a challenging AKI etiology, HRS, over ICD-9 coding. We also compared performance among multiple approaches to EHR-derived phenotyping, and found similar results between methods. Lastly, we showed that automated NLP dimension reduction is viable for acute illness.
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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17 MeSH Terms
Integrating linear optimization with structural modeling to increase HIV neutralization breadth.
Sevy AM, Panda S, Crowe JE, Meiler J, Vorobeychik Y
(2018) PLoS Comput Biol 14: e1005999
MeSH Terms: Algorithms, Amino Acid Motifs, Antibodies, Neutralizing, Computational Biology, Epitopes, HIV Antibodies, HIV Infections, HIV-1, Humans, Linear Models, Machine Learning, Regression Analysis, Software, Support Vector Machine
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
Computational protein design has been successful in modeling fixed backbone proteins in a single conformation. However, when modeling large ensembles of flexible proteins, current methods in protein design have been insufficient. Large barriers in the energy landscape are difficult to traverse while redesigning a protein sequence, and as a result current design methods only sample a fraction of available sequence space. We propose a new computational approach that combines traditional structure-based modeling using the Rosetta software suite with machine learning and integer linear programming to overcome limitations in the Rosetta sampling methods. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this method, which we call BROAD, by benchmarking the performance on increasing predicted breadth of anti-HIV antibodies. We use this novel method to increase predicted breadth of naturally-occurring antibody VRC23 against a panel of 180 divergent HIV viral strains and achieve 100% predicted binding against the panel. In addition, we compare the performance of this method to state-of-the-art multistate design in Rosetta and show that we can outperform the existing method significantly. We further demonstrate that sequences recovered by this method recover known binding motifs of broadly neutralizing anti-HIV antibodies. Finally, our approach is general and can be extended easily to other protein systems. Although our modeled antibodies were not tested in vitro, we predict that these variants would have greatly increased breadth compared to the wild-type antibody.
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14 MeSH Terms
Best Practices for Physician-Scientist Training Programs: Recommendations from the Alliance for Academic Internal Medicine.
Blanchard M, Burton MC, Geraci MW, Madaio MP, Marsh JD, Proweller A, Rockey DC, Salata RA, Tan W, Williams CS, Zaidi M, Todd RF
(2018) Am J Med 131: 578-584
MeSH Terms: Biomedical Research, Curriculum, Education, Medical, Graduate, Humans, Internship and Residency, Mentoring, Research Support as Topic, United States
Added April 15, 2019
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Benefits and Risks of Machine Learning Decision Support Systems.
Lasko TA, Walsh CG, Malin B
(2017) JAMA 318: 2355
MeSH Terms: Decision Support Systems, Clinical, Expert Systems, Humans, Machine Learning, Risk Assessment
Added March 14, 2018
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Modeling Continuous Prognostic Factors in Survival Analysis: Implications for Tumor Staging and Assessing Chemotherapy Effect in Osteosarcoma.
Cates JMM
(2018) Am J Surg Pathol 42: 485-491
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Age Factors, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Bone Neoplasms, Chemotherapy, Adjuvant, Child, Databases, Factual, Decision Support Techniques, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Models, Statistical, Necrosis, Neoadjuvant Therapy, Neoplasm Staging, Orthopedic Procedures, Osteosarcoma, Predictive Value of Tests, Risk Assessment, Risk Factors, Time Factors, Treatment Outcome, Tumor Burden, United States, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added November 1, 2018
Extent of response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy, tumor size, and patient age are important prognostic variables for patients with osteosarcoma, but applying information from these continuous variables in survival models is difficult. Dichotomization is usually inappropriate and alternative statistical techniques should be considered instead. Nonlinear multivariable regression methods (restricted cubic splines and fractional polynomials) were applied to data from the National Cancer Database to model continuous prognostic factors for overall survival from localized, high-grade osteosarcoma of the appendicular and nonspinal skeleton following neoadjuvant chemotherapy and surgical resection (N=2493). The assumption that log hazard ratios were linear in relation to these continuous prognostic factors was tested using likelihood ratio tests of model deviance and Wald tests of spline coefficients. Log hazard ratios for increasing patient age were linear over the range of 4 to 80 years, but showed evidence for variation in the coefficient over elapsed follow-up time. Tumor size also showed a linear relationship with log hazard over the range of 1 to 30 cm. Hazard ratios for chemotherapy effect profoundly deviated from log-linear (P<0.004), with significantly decreased hazard for death from baseline for patients with ≥90% tumor necrosis (hazard ratio, 0.32; 95% confidence interval, 0.20-0.52; P<0.0001). Important implications of these results include: (1) ≥90% tumor necrosis defines good chemotherapy response in a clinically useful manner; (2) staging osteosarcoma by dichotomizing tumor size is inappropriate; and (3) patient age can be modeled as a linear effect on the log hazard ratio in prognostic models with the caveat that risk may change over duration of the analysis.
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28 MeSH Terms
Evaluating the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement project risk calculator: results from the U.S. Extrahepatic Biliary Malignancy Consortium.
Beal EW, Lyon E, Kearney J, Wei L, Ethun CG, Black SM, Dillhoff M, Salem A, Weber SM, Tran TB, Poultsides G, Shenoy R, Hatzaras I, Krasnick B, Fields RC, Buttner S, Scoggins CR, Martin RCG, Isom CA, Idrees K, Mogal HD, Shen P, Maithel SK, Pawlik TM, Schmidt CR
(2017) HPB (Oxford) 19: 1104-1111
MeSH Terms: Academic Medical Centers, Adult, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Area Under Curve, Bile Duct Neoplasms, Biliary Tract Surgical Procedures, Cholangiocarcinoma, Databases, Factual, Decision Support Techniques, Female, Gallbladder Neoplasms, Hepatectomy, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Pancreaticoduodenectomy, Patient Readmission, Postoperative Complications, Predictive Value of Tests, ROC Curve, Reoperation, Retrospective Studies, Risk Assessment, Risk Factors, Time Factors, Treatment Outcome, United States, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2018
BACKGROUND - The objective of this study is to evaluate use of the American College of Surgeons (ACS) National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) online risk calculator for estimating common outcomes after operations for gallbladder cancer and extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma.
METHODS - Subjects from the United States Extrahepatic Biliary Malignancy Consortium (USE-BMC) who underwent operation between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2014 at 10 academic medical centers were included in this study. Calculator estimates of risk were compared to actual outcomes.
RESULTS - The majority of patients underwent partial or major hepatectomy, Whipple procedures or extrahepatic bile duct resection. For the entire cohort, c-statistics for surgical site infection (0.635), reoperation (0.680) and readmission (0.565) were less than 0.7. The c-statistic for death was 0.740. For all outcomes the actual proportion of patients experiencing an event was much higher than the median predicted risk of that event. Similarly, the group of patients who experienced an outcome did have higher median predicted risk than those who did not.
CONCLUSIONS - The ACS NSQIP risk calculator is easy to use but requires further modifications to more accurately estimate outcomes for some patient populations and operations for which validation studies show suboptimal performance.
Copyright © 2017 International Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Association Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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29 MeSH Terms
Calibration drift in regression and machine learning models for acute kidney injury.
Davis SE, Lasko TA, Chen G, Siew ED, Matheny ME
(2017) J Am Med Inform Assoc 24: 1052-1061
MeSH Terms: Acute Kidney Injury, Aged, Bayes Theorem, Clinical Decision-Making, Decision Support Techniques, Female, Hospitals, Veterans, Humans, Logistic Models, Machine Learning, Male, Middle Aged, United States
Show Abstract · Added April 7, 2017
Objective - Predictive analytics create opportunities to incorporate personalized risk estimates into clinical decision support. Models must be well calibrated to support decision-making, yet calibration deteriorates over time. This study explored the influence of modeling methods on performance drift and connected observed drift with data shifts in the patient population.
Materials and Methods - Using 2003 admissions to Department of Veterans Affairs hospitals nationwide, we developed 7 parallel models for hospital-acquired acute kidney injury using common regression and machine learning methods, validating each over 9 subsequent years.
Results - Discrimination was maintained for all models. Calibration declined as all models increasingly overpredicted risk. However, the random forest and neural network models maintained calibration across ranges of probability, capturing more admissions than did the regression models. The magnitude of overprediction increased over time for the regression models while remaining stable and small for the machine learning models. Changes in the rate of acute kidney injury were strongly linked to increasing overprediction, while changes in predictor-outcome associations corresponded with diverging patterns of calibration drift across methods.
Conclusions - Efficient and effective updating protocols will be essential for maintaining accuracy of, user confidence in, and safety of personalized risk predictions to support decision-making. Model updating protocols should be tailored to account for variations in calibration drift across methods and respond to periods of rapid performance drift rather than be limited to regularly scheduled annual or biannual intervals.
© The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com
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13 MeSH Terms
Typical and atypical pathology in primary progressive aphasia variants.
Spinelli EG, Mandelli ML, Miller ZA, Santos-Santos MA, Wilson SM, Agosta F, Grinberg LT, Huang EJ, Trojanowski JQ, Meyer M, Henry ML, Comi G, Rabinovici G, Rosen HJ, Filippi M, Miller BL, Seeley WW, Gorno-Tempini ML
(2017) Ann Neurol 81: 430-443
MeSH Terms: Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Alzheimer Disease, Aphasia, Primary Progressive, Atrophy, Female, Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration, Gray Matter, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Pick Disease of the Brain, Primary Progressive Nonfluent Aphasia, Support Vector Machine, White Matter, tau Proteins
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
OBJECTIVE - To characterize in vivo signatures of pathological diagnosis in a large cohort of patients with primary progressive aphasia (PPA) variants defined by current diagnostic classification.
METHODS - Extensive clinical, cognitive, neuroimaging, and neuropathological data were collected from 69 patients with sporadic PPA, divided into 29 semantic (svPPA), 25 nonfluent (nfvPPA), 11 logopenic (lvPPA), and 4 mixed PPA. Patterns of gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) atrophy at presentation were assessed and tested as predictors of pathological diagnosis using support vector machine (SVM) algorithms.
RESULTS - A clinical diagnosis of PPA was associated with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) with transactive response DNA-binding protein (TDP) inclusions in 40.5%, FTLD-tau in 40.5%, and Alzheimer disease (AD) pathology in 19% of cases. Each variant was associated with 1 typical pathology; 24 of 29 (83%) svPPA showed FTLD-TDP type C, 22 of 25 (88%) nfvPPA showed FTLD-tau, and all 11 lvPPA had AD. Within FTLD-tau, 4R-tau pathology was commonly associated with nfvPPA, whereas Pick disease was observed in a minority of subjects across all variants except for lvPPA. Compared with pathologically typical cases, svPPA-tau showed significant extrapyramidal signs, greater executive impairment, and severe striatal and frontal GM and WM atrophy. nfvPPA-TDP patients lacked general motor symptoms or significant WM atrophy. Combining GM and WM volumes, SVM analysis showed 92.7% accuracy to distinguish FTLD-tau and FTLD-TDP pathologies across variants.
INTERPRETATION - Each PPA clinical variant is associated with a typical and most frequent cognitive, neuroimaging, and neuropathological profile. Specific clinical and early anatomical features may suggest rare and atypical pathological diagnosis in vivo. Ann Neurol 2017;81:430-443.
© 2017 American Neurological Association.
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