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Non-visual arrestins regulate the focal adhesion formation via small GTPases RhoA and Rac1 independently of GPCRs.
Cleghorn WM, Bulus N, Kook S, Gurevich VV, Zent R, Gurevich EV
(2018) Cell Signal 42: 259-269
MeSH Terms: Actin Cytoskeleton, Animals, Cell Adhesion, Cell Line, Cell Movement, Fibroblasts, Focal Adhesions, Gene Expression Regulation, Mice, Neuropeptides, Receptors, G-Protein-Coupled, Signal Transduction, beta-Arrestin 1, beta-Arrestin 2, cdc42 GTP-Binding Protein, rac1 GTP-Binding Protein, rho GTP-Binding Proteins, rhoA GTP-Binding Protein
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
Arrestins recruit a variety of signaling proteins to active phosphorylated G protein-coupled receptors in the plasma membrane and to the cytoskeleton. Loss of arrestins leads to decreased cell migration, altered cell shape, and an increase in focal adhesions. Small GTPases of the Rho family are molecular switches that regulate actin cytoskeleton and affect a variety of dynamic cellular functions including cell migration and cell morphology. Here we show that non-visual arrestins differentially regulate RhoA and Rac1 activity to promote cell spreading via actin reorganization, and focal adhesion formation via two distinct mechanisms. Arrestins regulate these small GTPases independently of G-protein-coupled receptor activation.
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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18 MeSH Terms
RHOA GTPase Controls YAP-Mediated EREG Signaling in Small Intestinal Stem Cell Maintenance.
Liu M, Zhang Z, Sampson L, Zhou X, Nalapareddy K, Feng Y, Akunuru S, Melendez J, Davis AK, Bi F, Geiger H, Xin M, Zheng Y
(2017) Stem Cell Reports 9: 1961-1975
MeSH Terms: Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing, Animals, Cell Cycle Proteins, Cell Differentiation, Cell Proliferation, Epiregulin, Epithelium, Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental, Intestine, Small, Mice, Mice, Knockout, Morphogenesis, Phosphoproteins, Stem Cells, Wnt Signaling Pathway, beta Catenin, rho GTP-Binding Proteins, rhoA GTP-Binding Protein
Show Abstract · Added February 7, 2018
RHOA, a founding member of the Rho GTPase family, is critical for actomyosin dynamics, polarity, and morphogenesis in response to developmental cues, mechanical stress, and inflammation. In murine small intestinal epithelium, inducible RHOA deletion causes a loss of epithelial polarity, with disrupted villi and crypt organization. In the intestinal crypts, RHOA deficiency results in reduced cell proliferation, increased apoptosis, and a loss of intestinal stem cells (ISCs) that mimic effects of radiation damage. Mechanistically, RHOA loss reduces YAP signaling of the Hippo pathway and affects YAP effector epiregulin (EREG) expression in the crypts. Expression of an active YAP (S112A) mutant rescues ISC marker expression, ISC regeneration, and ISC-associated Wnt signaling, but not defective epithelial polarity, in RhoA knockout mice, implicating YAP in RHOA-regulated ISC function. EREG treatment or active β-catenin Catnb mutant expression rescues the RhoA KO ISC phenotypes. Thus, RHOA controls YAP-EREG signaling to regulate intestinal homeostasis and ISC regeneration.
Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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18 MeSH Terms
Analysis of TcdB Proteins within the Hypervirulent Clade 2 Reveals an Impact of RhoA Glucosylation on Clostridium difficile Proinflammatory Activities.
Quesada-Gómez C, López-Ureña D, Chumbler N, Kroh HK, Castro-Peña C, Rodríguez C, Orozco-Aguilar J, González-Camacho S, Rucavado A, Guzmán-Verri C, Lawley TD, Lacy DB, Chaves-Olarte E
(2016) Infect Immun 84: 856-65
MeSH Terms: Animals, Bacterial Proteins, Bacterial Toxins, Clostridioides difficile, Enterocolitis, Pseudomembranous, Genotype, Glycosylation, Host-Pathogen Interactions, Humans, Male, Mice, Virulence, rhoA GTP-Binding Protein
Show Abstract · Added April 4, 2016
Clostridium difficile strains within the hypervirulent clade 2 are responsible for nosocomial outbreaks worldwide. The increased pathogenic potential of these strains has been attributed to several factors but is still poorly understood. During a C. difficile outbreak, a strain from this clade was found to induce a variant cytopathic effect (CPE), different from the canonical arborizing CPE. This strain (NAP1V) belongs to the NAP1 genotype but to a ribotype different from the epidemic NAP1/RT027 strain. NAP1V and NAP1 share some properties, including the overproduction of toxins, the binary toxin, and mutations in tcdC. NAP1V is not resistant to fluoroquinolones, however. A comparative analysis of TcdB proteins from NAP1/RT027 and NAP1V strains indicated that both target Rac, Cdc42, Rap, and R-Ras but only the former glucosylates RhoA. Thus, TcdB from hypervirulent clade 2 strains possesses an extended substrate profile, and RhoA is crucial for the type of CPE induced. Sequence comparison and structural modeling revealed that TcdBNAP1 and TcdBNAP1V share the receptor-binding and autoprocessing activities but vary in the glucosyltransferase domain, consistent with the different substrate profile. Whereas the two toxins displayed identical cytotoxic potencies, TcdBNAP1 induced a stronger proinflammatory response than TcdBNAP1V as determined in ex vivo experiments and animal models. Since immune activation at the level of intestinal mucosa is a hallmark of C. difficile-induced infections, we propose that the panel of substrates targeted by TcdB is a determining factor in the pathogenesis of this pathogen and in the differential virulence potential seen among C. difficile strains.
Copyright © 2016 Quesada-Gómez et al.
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13 MeSH Terms
p120-catenin controls contractility along the vertical axis of epithelial lateral membranes.
Yu HH, Dohn MR, Markham NO, Coffey RJ, Reynolds AB
(2016) J Cell Sci 129: 80-94
MeSH Terms: Amino Acid Sequence, Animals, Cadherins, Catenins, Cell Membrane, Cell Polarity, Cell Shape, Dogs, Epithelial Cells, Madin Darby Canine Kidney Cells, Molecular Sequence Data, Nonmuscle Myosin Type IIA, Phenotype, Protein Binding, rho-Associated Kinases, rhoA GTP-Binding Protein
Show Abstract · Added May 2, 2016
In vertebrate epithelia, p120-catenin (hereafter referred to as p120; also known as CTNND1) mediates E-cadherin stability and suppression of RhoA. Genetic ablation of p120 in various epithelial tissues typically causes striking alterations in tissue function and morphology. Although these effects could very well involve p120's activity towards Rho, ascertaining the impact of this relationship has been complicated by the fact that p120 is also required for cell-cell adhesion. Here, we have molecularly uncoupled p120's cadherin-stabilizing and RhoA-suppressing activites. Unexpectedly, removing p120's Rho-suppressing activity dramatically disrupted the integrity of the apical surface, irrespective of E-cadherin stability. The physical defect was tracked to excessive actomyosin contractility along the vertical axis of lateral membranes. Thus, we suggest that p120's distinct activities towards E-cadherin and Rho are molecularly and functionally coupled and this, in turn, enables the maintenance of cell shape in the larger context of an epithelial monolayer. Importantly, local suppression of contractility by cadherin-bound p120 appears to go beyond regulating cell shape, as loss of this activity also leads to major defects in epithelial lumenogenesis.
© 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.
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16 MeSH Terms
EP3 receptor deficiency attenuates pulmonary hypertension through suppression of Rho/TGF-β1 signaling.
Lu A, Zuo C, He Y, Chen G, Piao L, Zhang J, Xiao B, Shen Y, Tang J, Kong D, Alberti S, Chen D, Zuo S, Zhang Q, Yan S, Fei X, Yuan F, Zhou B, Duan S, Yu Y, Lazarus M, Su Y, Breyer RM, Funk CD, Yu Y
(2015) J Clin Invest 125: 1228-42
MeSH Terms: Animals, Cell Hypoxia, Cells, Cultured, Extracellular Matrix, Extracellular Matrix Proteins, Hypertension, Pulmonary, Male, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Pulmonary Artery, Rats, Sprague-Dawley, Receptors, Prostaglandin E, EP3 Subtype, Signal Transduction, Sulfonamides, Transforming Growth Factor beta1, Vascular Remodeling, rho GTP-Binding Proteins, rhoA GTP-Binding Protein
Show Abstract · Added February 6, 2016
Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is commonly associated with chronic hypoxemia in disorders such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Prostacyclin analogs are widely used in the management of PAH patients; however, clinical efficacy and long-term tolerability of some prostacyclin analogs may be compromised by concomitant activation of the E-prostanoid 3 (EP3) receptor. Here, we found that EP3 expression is upregulated in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) and human distal pulmonary arteries (PAs) in response to hypoxia. Either pharmacological inhibition of EP3 or Ep3 deletion attenuated both hypoxia and monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension and restrained extracellular matrix accumulation in PAs in rodent models. In a murine PAH model, Ep3 deletion in SMCs, but not endothelial cells, retarded PA medial thickness. Knockdown of EP3α and EP3β, but not EP3γ, isoforms diminished hypoxia-induced TGF-β1 activation. Expression of either EP3α or EP3β in EP3-deficient PASMCs restored TGF-β1 activation in response to hypoxia. EP3α/β activation in PASMCs increased RhoA-dependent membrane type 1 extracellular matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) translocation to the cell surface, subsequently activating pro-MMP-2 and promoting TGF-β1 signaling. Activation or disruption of EP3 did not influence PASMC proliferation. Together, our results indicate that EP3 activation facilitates hypoxia-induced vascular remodeling and pulmonary hypertension in mice and suggest EP3 inhibition as a potential therapeutic strategy for pulmonary hypertension.
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18 MeSH Terms
Type III TGFβ receptor and Src direct hyaluronan-mediated invasive cell motility.
Allison P, Espiritu D, Barnett JV, Camenisch TD
(2015) Cell Signal 27: 453-9
MeSH Terms: Actin Cytoskeleton, Amino Acid Substitution, Animals, Arrestin, Cell Movement, Cells, Cultured, Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition, Hyaluronic Acid, Mice, Neuropeptides, Pericardium, Protein Binding, Proteoglycans, RNA Interference, RNA, Small Interfering, Receptors, Transforming Growth Factor beta, cdc42 GTP-Binding Protein, rac1 GTP-Binding Protein, rho GTP-Binding Proteins, rhoA GTP-Binding Protein, src-Family Kinases
Show Abstract · Added February 21, 2016
During embryogenesis, the epicardium undergoes proliferation, migration, and differentiation into several cardiac cell types which contribute to the coronary vessels. This process requires epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) and directed cellular invasion. The Type III Transforming Growth Factor-beta Receptor (TGFβR3) is required for epicardial cell invasion and coronary vessel development. Using primary epicardial cells derived from Tgfbr3(+/+) and Tgfbr3(-/-) mouse embryos, high-molecular weight hyaluronan (HMWHA) stimulated cellular invasion and filamentous (f-actin) polymerization are detected in Tgfbr3(+/+) cells, but not in Tgfbr3(-/-) cells. Furthermore, HMWHA-stimulated cellular invasion and f-actin polymerization in Tgfbr3(+/+) epicardial cells are dependent on Src kinase. Src activation in HMWHA-stimulated Tgfbr3(-/-) epicardial cells is not detected in response to HMWHA. RhoA and Rac1 also fail to activate in response to HMWHA in Tgfbr3(-/-) cells. These events coincide with defective f-actin formation and deficient cellular invasion. Finally, a T841A activating substitution in TGFβR3 drives ligand-independent Src activation. Collectively, these data define a TGFβR3-Src-RhoA/Rac1 pathway that is essential for hyaluronan-directed cell invasion in epicardial cells.
Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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21 MeSH Terms
CD148 tyrosine phosphatase promotes cadherin cell adhesion.
Takahashi K, Matafonov A, Sumarriva K, Ito H, Lauhan C, Zemel D, Tsuboi N, Chen J, Reynolds A, Takahashi T
(2014) PLoS One 9: e112753
MeSH Terms: Cadherins, Cell Adhesion, Cell Line, Drosophila Proteins, Humans, Phosphorylation, Receptor-Like Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases, Class 3, Tyrosine, beta Catenin, cdc42 GTP-Binding Protein, rac GTP-Binding Proteins, rhoA GTP-Binding Protein
Show Abstract · Added February 12, 2015
CD148 is a transmembrane tyrosine phosphatase that is expressed at cell junctions. Recent studies have shown that CD148 associates with the cadherin/catenin complex and p120 catenin (p120) may serve as a substrate. However, the role of CD148 in cadherin cell-cell adhesion remains unknown. Therefore, here we addressed this issue using a series of stable cells and cell-based assays. Wild-type (WT) and catalytically inactive (CS) CD148 were introduced to A431D (lacking classical cadherins), A431D/E-cadherin WT (expressing wild-type E-cadherin), and A431D/E-cadherin 764AAA (expressing p120-uncoupled E-cadherin mutant) cells. The effects of CD148 in cadherin adhesion were assessed by Ca2+ switch and cell aggregation assays. Phosphorylation of E-cadherin/catenin complex and Rho family GTPase activities were also examined. Although CD148 introduction did not alter the expression levels and complex formation of E-cadherin, p120, and β-catenin, CD148 WT, but not CS, promoted cadherin contacts and strengthened cell-cell adhesion in A431D/E-cadherin WT cells. This effect was accompanied by an increase in Rac1, but not RhoA and Cdc42, activity and largely diminished by Rac1 inhibition. Further, we demonstrate that CD148 reduces the tyrosine phosphorylation of p120 and β-catenin; causes the dephosphorylation of Y529 suppressive tyrosine residue in Src, a well-known CD148 site, increasing Src activity and enhancing the phosphorylation of Y228 (a Src kinase site) in p120, in E-cadherin contacts. Consistent with these findings, CD148 dephosphorylated both p120 and β-catenin in vitro. The shRNA-mediated CD148 knockdown in A431 cells showed opposite effects. CD148 showed no effects in A431D and A431D/E-cadherin 764AAA cells. In aggregate, these findings provide the first evidence that CD148 promotes E-cadherin adhesion by regulating Rac1 activity concomitant with modulation of p120, β-catenin, and Src tyrosine phosphorylation. This effect requires E-cadherin and p120 association.
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12 MeSH Terms
Differential role for p120-catenin in regulation of TLR4 signaling in macrophages.
Yang Z, Sun D, Yan Z, Reynolds AB, Christman JW, Minshall RD, Malik AB, Zhang Y, Hu G
(2014) J Immunol 193: 1931-41
MeSH Terms: Acute Lung Injury, Adaptor Proteins, Vesicular Transport, Animals, Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid, Catenins, Cells, Cultured, Endocytosis, Interferon Regulatory Factor-3, Interferon-beta, Interleukin-6, Leukocyte Count, Lipopolysaccharides, Macrophages, Alveolar, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Myeloid Differentiation Factor 88, NF-kappa B, Neutrophils, Protein Transport, RNA Interference, Signal Transduction, Toll-Like Receptor 2, Toll-Like Receptor 3, Toll-Like Receptor 4, Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha, rhoA GTP-Binding Protein
Show Abstract · Added May 2, 2016
Activation of TLR signaling through recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns is essential for the innate immune response against bacterial and viral infections. We have shown that p120-catenin (p120) suppresses TLR4-mediated NF-кB signaling in LPS-challenged endothelial cells. In this article, we report that p120 differentially regulates LPS/TLR4 signaling in mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages. We observed that p120 inhibited MyD88-dependent NF-κB activation and release of TNF-α and IL-6, but enhanced TIR domain-containing adapter-inducing IFN-β-dependent IFN regulatory factor 3 activation and release of IFN-β upon LPS exposure. p120 silencing diminished LPS-induced TLR4 internalization, whereas genetic and pharmacological inhibition of RhoA GTPase rescued the decrease in endocytosis of TLR4 and TLR4-MyD88 signaling, and reversed the increase in TLR4-TIR domain-containing adapter-inducing IFN-β signaling induced by p120 depletion. Furthermore, we demonstrated that altered p120 expression in macrophages regulates the inflammatory phenotype of LPS-induced acute lung injury. These results indicate that p120 functions as a differential regulator of TLR4 signaling pathways by facilitating TLR4 endocytic trafficking in macrophages, and support a novel role for p120 in influencing the macrophages in the lung inflammatory response to endotoxin.
Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.
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27 MeSH Terms
JAM-A associates with ZO-2, afadin, and PDZ-GEF1 to activate Rap2c and regulate epithelial barrier function.
Monteiro AC, Sumagin R, Rankin CR, Leoni G, Mina MJ, Reiter DM, Stehle T, Dermody TS, Schaefer SA, Hall RA, Nusrat A, Parkos CA
(2013) Mol Biol Cell 24: 2849-60
MeSH Terms: Animals, Capsid Proteins, Cell Adhesion Molecules, Cell Line, Cell Membrane Permeability, Cell Polarity, Cytoskeleton, Down-Regulation, Endocytosis, Epithelial Cells, Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors, Humans, Mice, Microfilament Proteins, Models, Biological, Molecular Weight, Nerve Tissue Proteins, Protein Binding, Protein Transport, Receptors, Cell Surface, Tight Junctions, Zonula Occludens-2 Protein, rap1 GTP-Binding Proteins, ras Proteins, rhoA GTP-Binding Protein
Show Abstract · Added December 10, 2013
Intestinal barrier function is regulated by epithelial tight junctions (TJs), structures that control paracellular permeability. Junctional adhesion molecule-A (JAM-A) is a TJ-associated protein that regulates barrier; however, mechanisms linking JAM-A to epithelial permeability are poorly understood. Here we report that JAM-A associates directly with ZO-2 and indirectly with afadin, and this complex, along with PDZ-GEF1, activates the small GTPase Rap2c. Supporting a functional link, small interfering RNA-mediated down-regulation of the foregoing regulatory proteins results in enhanced permeability similar to that observed after JAM-A loss. JAM-A-deficient mice and cultured epithelial cells demonstrate enhanced paracellular permeability to large molecules, revealing a potential role of JAM-A in controlling perijunctional actin cytoskeleton in addition to its previously reported role in regulating claudin proteins and small-molecule permeability. Further experiments suggest that JAM-A does not regulate actin turnover but modulates activity of RhoA and phosphorylation of nonmuscle myosin, both implicated in actomyosin contraction. These results suggest that JAM-A regulates epithelial permeability via association with ZO-2, afadin, and PDZ-GEF1 to activate Rap2c and control contraction of the apical cytoskeleton.
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25 MeSH Terms
Migration of turkey muscle satellite cells is enhanced by the syndecan-4 cytoplasmic domain through the activation of RhoA.
Shin J, McFarland DC, Velleman SG
(2013) Mol Cell Biochem 375: 115-30
MeSH Terms: Animals, Avian Proteins, Cell Movement, Cells, Cultured, Enzyme Activation, Gene Knockdown Techniques, Male, Protein Kinase C-alpha, Protein Structure, Tertiary, RNA, Small Interfering, Satellite Cells, Skeletal Muscle, Syndecan-4, Turkey, rhoA GTP-Binding Protein
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2014
Syndecan-4 (S4) is a cell membrane-associated heparan sulfate proteoglycan that forms oligomers in muscle satellite cells. The S4 oligomers activate protein kinase Cα (PKCα) through the S4 cytoplasmic domain and may regulate the activation of ras homolog gene family member A (RhoA), a signal transduction molecule down-stream of PKCα which is thought to influence cell migration. However, little is known about the function of the S4 cytoplasmic domain in satellite cell migration and RhoA activation. The objective of the current study was to determine the function of S4 and its cytoplasmic domain in cell migration and RhoA activation. To study the objective, clones of S4 and S4 without the cytoplasmic domain (S4C) were used in overexpression studies, and small interference RNAs targeting S4 or RhoA were used in knockdown studies. Satellite cell migration was increased by S4 overexpression, but decreased by the knockdown or deletion of the S4 cytoplasmic domain. The RhoA protein was activated by the overexpression of S4, but not with the deletion of the S4 cytoplasmic domain. The treatment of Rho activator II or the knockdown of RhoA also modulated satellite cell migration. Finally, co-transfection (S4 overexpression and RhoA knockdown) and rescue (the knockdown of S4 and the treatment with Rho activator II) studies demonstrated that S4-mediated satellite cell migration was regulated through the activation of RhoA. The cytoplasmic domain of S4 is required for cell migration and RhoA activation which will affect muscle fiber formation.
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14 MeSH Terms