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Association of uterine fibroids with birthweight and gestational age.
Zhao SK, Wu P, Jones SH, Torstenson ES, Hartmann KE, Velez Edwards DR
(2020) Ann Epidemiol 50: 35-40.e2
MeSH Terms: Adult, Birth Weight, Cohort Studies, Female, Fetal Development, Gestational Age, Humans, Leiomyoma, Pregnancy, Prospective Studies, Ultrasonography, Uterine Neoplasms
Show Abstract · Added August 5, 2020
PURPOSE - To determine if fibroids or their characteristics are associated with birthweight and/or gestational age, and to assess the impact of race or ethnicity.
METHODS - Right from the Start (2000-2012) is a prospective cohort that enrolled women from the southern US in early pregnancy. Transvaginal ultrasounds were used to measure fibroid characteristics and confirm gestational age. Date of birth and birthweight were obtained from vital or medical records. We assessed whether fibroid presence, number, type, and volume were associated with birthweight and/or gestational age using multivariate analysis of covariance, accounting for a priori confounders.
RESULTS - Among 3926 women, 416 had one or more fibroids. Mean infant birthweight and gestational age were similar among women with and without fibroids. When adjusting for race or ethnicity, all associations were attenuated. Overall, women with and without fibroids had infants of similar birthweight (-20 grams, 95% confidence interval [CI] -77, 36) and gestational age (0.4 days, 95% CI -0.9, 1.8). Women with three or more fibroids were more likely to have lighter infants (-201 grams, 95% CI -345, -58).
CONCLUSIONS - Race or ethnicity substantially confounds the associations. The clinical belief that uterine fibroids impair fetal growth is supported only by a significant decrease in birthweight for women with multiple fibroids.
Copyright © 2020 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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12 MeSH Terms
Week-by-week alcohol consumption in early pregnancy and spontaneous abortion risk: a prospective cohort study.
Sundermann AC, Velez Edwards DR, Slaughter JC, Wu P, Jones SH, Torstenson ES, Hartmann KE
(2021) Am J Obstet Gynecol 224: 97.e1-97.e16
MeSH Terms: Abortion, Spontaneous, Adult, Alcohol Drinking, Cohort Studies, Female, Gestational Age, Humans, Pregnancy, Prenatal Care, Prospective Studies, Risk Factors, United States, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added August 5, 2020
BACKGROUND - Half of women use alcohol in the first weeks of gestation, but most stop once pregnancy is detected. The relationship between timing of alcohol use cessation in early pregnancy and spontaneous abortion risk has not been determined.
OBJECTIVE - This study aimed to evaluate the association between week-by-week alcohol consumption in early pregnancy and spontaneous abortion.
STUDY DESIGN - Participants in Right from the Start, a community-based prospective pregnancy cohort, were recruited from 8 metropolitan areas in the United States (2000-2012). In the first trimester, participants provided information about alcohol consumed in the prior 4 months, including whether they altered alcohol use; date of change in use; and frequency, amount, and type of alcohol consumed before and after change. We assessed the association between spontaneous abortion and week of alcohol use, cumulative weeks exposed, number of drinks per week, beverage type, and binge drinking.
RESULTS - Among 5353 participants, 49.7% reported using alcohol during early pregnancy and 12.0% miscarried. Median gestational age at change in alcohol use was 29 days (interquartile range, 15-35 days). Alcohol use during weeks 5 through 10 from last menstrual period was associated with increased spontaneous abortion risk, with risk peaking for use in week 9. Each successive week of alcohol use was associated with an 8% increase in spontaneous abortion relative to those who did not drink (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.08; 95% confidence interval, 1.04-1.12). This risk is cumulative. In addition, risk was not related to number of drinks per week, beverage type, or binge drinking.
CONCLUSION - Each additional week of alcohol exposure during the first trimester increases risk of spontaneous abortion, even at low levels of consumption and when excluding binge drinking.
Copyright © 2020 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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A Murine Model of Fetal Exposure to Maternal Inflammation to Study the Effects of Acute Chorioamnionitis on Newborn Intestinal Development.
Juber BA, Elgin TG, Fricke EM, Gong H, Reese J, McElroy SJ
(2020) J Vis Exp :
MeSH Terms: Acute Disease, Animals, Chorioamnionitis, Cytokines, Disease Models, Animal, Female, Fetus, Humans, Infant, Newborn, Intestines, Mice, Mothers, Paneth Cells, Placenta, Pregnancy, Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Show Abstract · Added January 7, 2021
Chorioamnionitis is a common precipitant of preterm birth and is associated with many of the morbidities of prematurity, including necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). However, a mechanistic link between these two conditions remains yet to be discovered. We have adopted a murine model of chorioamnionitis involving lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced fetal exposure to maternal inflammation (FEMI). This model of FEMI induces a sterile maternal, placental, and fetal inflammatory cascade, which is also present in many cases of clinical chorioamnionitis. Although models exist that utilize live bacteria and more accurately mimic the pathophysiology of an ascending infection resulting in chorioamnionitis, these methods may cause indirect effects on development of the immature intestinal tract and the associated developing microbiome. Using this protocol, we have demonstrated that LPS-induced FEMI results in a dose-dependent increase in pregnancy loss and preterm birth, as well as disruption of normal intestinal development in offspring. Further, we have demonstrated that FEMI significantly increases intestinal injury and serum cytokines in offspring, while simultaneously decreasing goblet and Paneth cells, both of which provide a first line of innate immunity against intestinal inflammation. Although a similar model of LPS-induced FEMI has been used to model the association between chorioamnionitis and subsequent abnormalities of the central nervous system, to our knowledge, this protocol is the first to attempt to elucidate a mechanistic link between chorioamnionitis and later perturbations in intestinal development as a potential link between chorioamnionitis and NEC.
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Maternal microbial molecules affect offspring health.
Ferguson J
(2020) Science 367: 978-979
MeSH Terms: Animals, Child, Child Health, Diet, High-Fat, Female, Gastrointestinal Microbiome, Mice, Obesity, Phenotype, Pregnancy
Added March 3, 2020
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Palmitate induces apoptotic cell death and inflammasome activation in human placental macrophages.
Rogers LM, Serezani CH, Eastman AJ, Hasty AH, Englund-Ögge L, Jacobsson B, Vickers KC, Aronoff DM
(2020) Placenta 90: 45-51
MeSH Terms: Adult, Apoptosis, Cytokines, Female, Glucose, Humans, Inflammasomes, Insulin, Macrophages, Palmitic Acid, Placenta, Pregnancy
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
INTRODUCTION - There is an increasing prevalence of non-communicable diseases worldwide. Metabolic diseases such as obesity and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) increasingly affect women during pregnancy, which can harm pregnancy outcomes and the long-term health and wellbeing of exposed offspring. Both obesity and GDM have been associated with proinflammatory effects within the placenta, the critical organ governing fetal development.
METHODS - The purpose of these studies was to model, in vitro, the effects of metabolic stress (high levels of glucose, insulin and saturated lipids) on placental macrophage biology, since these cells are the primary innate immune phagocyte within the placenta with roles in governing maternofetal immune tolerance and antimicrobial host defense. Macrophages were isolated from the villous core of term, human placentae delivered through nonlaboring, elective Cesarean sections and exposed to combinations of elevated glucose (30 mM), insulin (10 nM) and the saturated lipid palmitic acid (palmitate, 0.4 mM).
RESULTS - We found that palmitate alone induced the activation of the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor (NLR) Family Pyrin Domain Containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome in placental macrophages, which was associated with increased interleukin 1 beta release and an increase in apoptotic cell death. Glucose and insulin neither provoked these effects nor augmented the impact of palmitate itself.
DISCUSSION - Our findings confirm an impact of saturated fat on placental macrophage immune activation and could be relevant to the impact of metabolic stress in vivo.
Copyright © 2019 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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Fetal exposure to maternal inflammation interrupts murine intestinal development and increases susceptibility to neonatal intestinal injury.
Elgin TG, Fricke EM, Gong H, Reese J, Mills DA, Kalantera KM, Underwood MA, McElroy SJ
(2019) Dis Model Mech 12:
MeSH Terms: Animals, Animals, Newborn, Biomarkers, Cecum, Cytokines, Disease Susceptibility, Female, Fetus, Goblet Cells, Inflammation, Intestine, Small, Lipopolysaccharides, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Microbiota, Paneth Cells, Pregnancy
Show Abstract · Added July 28, 2020
Fetal exposure to chorioamnionitis can impact the outcomes of the developing fetus both at the time of birth and in the subsequent neonatal period. Infants exposed to chorioamnionitis have a higher incidence of gastrointestinal (GI) pathology, including necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC); however, the mechanism remains undefined. To simulate the fetal exposure to maternal inflammation (FEMI) induced by chorioamnionitis, pregnant mice (C57BL/6J, , or ) were injected intraperitoneally on embryonic day (E)15.5 with lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 100 µg/kg body weight). Pups were delivered at term, and reared to postnatal day (P)0, P7, P14, P28 or P56. Serum and intestinal tissue samples were collected to quantify growth, inflammatory markers, histological intestinal injury, and goblet and Paneth cells. To determine whether FEMI increased subsequent susceptibility to intestinal injury, a secondary dose of LPS (100 µg/kg body weight) was given on P5, prior to tissue harvesting on P7. FEMI had no effect on growth of the offspring or their small intestine. FEMI significantly decreased both goblet and Paneth cell numbers while simultaneously increasing serum levels of IL-1β, IL-10, KC/GRO (CXCL1 and CXCL2), TNF and IL-6. These alterations were IL-6 dependent and, importantly, increased susceptibility to LPS-induced intestinal injury later in life. Our data show that FEMI impairs normal intestinal development by decreasing components of innate immunity and simultaneously increasing markers of inflammation. These changes increase susceptibility to intestinal injury later in life and provide novel mechanistic data to potentially explain why preterm infants exposed to chorioamnionitis prior to birth have a higher incidence of NEC and other GI disorders.
© 2019. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.
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The Impact of Natural Selection on the Evolution and Function of Placentally Expressed Galectins.
Ely ZA, Moon JM, Sliwoski GR, Sangha AK, Shen XX, Labella AL, Meiler J, Capra JA, Rokas A
(2019) Genome Biol Evol 11: 2574-2592
MeSH Terms: Animals, Biological Evolution, Eutheria, Evolution, Molecular, Female, Galectins, Haplotypes, Humans, Models, Molecular, Phylogeny, Placenta, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Pregnancy, Selection, Genetic
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
Immunity genes have repeatedly experienced natural selection during mammalian evolution. Galectins are carbohydrate-binding proteins that regulate diverse immune responses, including maternal-fetal immune tolerance in placental pregnancy. Seven human galectins, four conserved across vertebrates and three specific to primates, are involved in placental development. To comprehensively study the molecular evolution of these galectins, both across mammals and within humans, we conducted a series of between- and within-species evolutionary analyses. By examining patterns of sequence evolution between species, we found that primate-specific galectins showed uniformly high substitution rates, whereas two of the four other galectins experienced accelerated evolution in primates. By examining human population genomic variation, we found that galectin genes and variants, including variants previously linked to immune diseases, showed signatures of recent positive selection in specific human populations. By examining one nonsynonymous variant in Galectin-8 previously associated with autoimmune diseases, we further discovered that it is tightly linked to three other nonsynonymous variants; surprisingly, the global frequency of this four-variant haplotype is ∼50%. To begin understanding the impact of this major haplotype on Galectin-8 protein structure, we modeled its 3D protein structure and found that it differed substantially from the reference protein structure. These results suggest that placentally expressed galectins experienced both ancient and more recent selection in a lineage- and population-specific manner. Furthermore, our discovery that the major Galectin-8 haplotype is structurally distinct from and more commonly found than the reference haplotype illustrates the significance of understanding the evolutionary processes that sculpted variants associated with human genetic disease.
© The Author(s) 2019. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.
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14 MeSH Terms
Immune Regulation in Eutherian Pregnancy: Live Birth Coevolved with Novel Immune Genes and Gene Regulation.
Moon JM, Capra JA, Abbot P, Rokas A
(2019) Bioessays 41: e1900072
MeSH Terms: Animals, Biological Evolution, Eutheria, Female, Gene Duplication, Gene Expression Regulation, Genetic Variation, Haplotypes, Humans, Live Birth, Pregnancy, Pregnancy, Animal, Regulatory Sequences, Nucleic Acid, Retroviridae, Selection, Genetic
Show Abstract · Added March 3, 2020
Novel regulatory elements that enabled expression of pre-existing immune genes in reproductive tissues and novel immune genes with pregnancy-specific roles in eutherians have shaped the evolution of mammalian pregnancy by facilitating the emergence of novel mechanisms for immune regulation over its course. Trade-offs arising from conflicting fitness effects on reproduction and host defenses have further influenced the patterns of genetic variation of these genes. These three mechanisms (novel regulatory elements, novel immune genes, and trade-offs) played a pivotal role in refining the regulation of maternal immune systems during pregnancy in eutherians, likely facilitating the establishment of prolonged direct maternal-fetal contact in eutherians without causing immunological rejection of the genetically distinct fetus.
© 2019 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.
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Brucella abortus Infection of Placental Trophoblasts Triggers Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Mediated Cell Death and Fetal Loss via Type IV Secretion System-Dependent Activation of CHOP.
Byndloss MX, Tsai AY, Walker GT, Miller CN, Young BM, English BC, Seyffert N, Kerrinnes T, de Jong MF, Atluri VL, Winter MG, Celli J, Tsolis RM
(2019) mBio 10:
MeSH Terms: Animals, Brucella abortus, Cell Death, Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress, Female, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Nod1 Signaling Adaptor Protein, Nod2 Signaling Adaptor Protein, Placenta, Pregnancy, Transcription Factor CHOP, Trophoblasts, Type IV Secretion Systems, Unfolded Protein Response
Show Abstract · Added March 30, 2020
Subversion of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) function is a feature shared by multiple intracellular bacteria and viruses, and in many cases this disruption of cellular function activates pathways of the unfolded protein response (UPR). In the case of infection with , the etiologic agent of brucellosis, the unfolded protein response in the infected placenta contributes to placentitis and abortion, leading to pathogen transmission. Here we show that infection of pregnant mice led to death of infected placental trophoblasts in a manner that depended on the VirB type IV secretion system (T4SS) and its effector VceC. The trophoblast death program required the ER stress-induced transcription factor CHOP. While NOD1/NOD2 expression in macrophages contributed to ER stress-induced inflammation, these receptors did not play a role in trophoblast death. Both placentitis and abortion were independent of apoptosis-associated Speck-like protein containing a caspase activation and recruitment domain (ASC). These studies show that uses its T4SS to induce cell-type-specific responses to ER stress in trophoblasts that trigger placental inflammation and abortion. Our results suggest further that in the T4SS and its effectors are under selection as bacterial transmission factors. infects the placenta of pregnant cows, where it replicates to high levels and triggers abortion of the calf. The aborted material is highly infectious and transmits infection to both cows and humans, but very little is known about how causes abortion. By studying this infection in pregnant mice, we discovered that kills trophoblasts, which are important cells for maintaining pregnancy. This killing required an injected bacterial protein (VceC) that triggered an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response in the trophoblast. By inhibiting ER stress or infecting mice that lack CHOP, a protein induced by ER stress, we could prevent death of trophoblasts, reduce inflammation, and increase the viability of the pups. Our results suggest that injects VceC into placental trophoblasts to promote its transmission by abortion.
Copyright © 2019 Byndloss et al.
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Loss of flow responsive Tie1 results in Impaired
Aortic valve remodeling.
Qu X, Violette K, Sewell-Loftin MK, Soslow J, Saint-Jean L, Hinton RB, Merryman WD, Baldwin HS
(2019) Dev Biol 455: 73-84
MeSH Terms: Animals, Aortic Valve, Endothelial Cells, Extracellular Matrix, Female, Gene Expression Profiling, Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental, Mice, 129 Strain, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Organogenesis, Pregnancy, Receptor, TIE-1, SOX9 Transcription Factor, Vascular Remodeling
Show Abstract · Added November 25, 2019
The mechanisms regulating endothelial cell response to hemodynamic forces required for heart valve development, especially valve remodeling, remain elusive. Tie1, an endothelial specific receptor tyrosine kinase, is up-regulated by oscillating shear stress and is required for lymphatic valve development. In this study, we demonstrate that valvular endothelial Tie1 is differentially expressed in a dynamic pattern predicted by disturbed flow during valve remodeling. Following valvular endocardial specific deletion of Tie1 in mice, we observed enlarged aortic valve leaflets, decreased valve stiffness and valvular insufficiency. Valve abnormalities were only detected in late gestation and early postnatal mutant animals and worsened with age. The mutant mice developed perturbed extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition and remodeling characterized by increased glycosaminoglycan and decreased collagen content, as well as increased valve interstitial cell expression of Sox9, a transcription factor essential for normal ECM maturation during heart valve development. This study provides the first evidence that Tie1 is involved in modulation of late valve remodeling and suggests that an important Tie1-Sox9 signaling axis exists through which disturbed flows are converted by endocardial cells to paracrine Sox9 signals to modulate normal matrix remodeling of the aortic valve.
Copyright © 2019. Published by Elsevier Inc.
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