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Hepatic glucose uptake and disposition during short-term high-fat vs. high-fructose feeding.
Coate KC, Kraft G, Moore MC, Smith MS, Ramnanan C, Irimia JM, Roach PJ, Farmer B, Neal DW, Williams P, Cherrington AD
(2014) Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 307: E151-60
MeSH Terms: Animals, Blood Glucose, Diet, High-Fat, Dietary Carbohydrates, Dietary Fats, Dogs, Fructose, Glucokinase, Glucose, Glycerol, Lactic Acid, Liver, Male, Triglycerides
Show Abstract · Added June 2, 2014
In dogs consuming a high-fat and -fructose diet (52 and 17% of total energy, respectively) for 4 wk, hepatic glucose uptake (HGU) in response to hyperinsulinemia, hyperglycemia, and portal glucose delivery is markedly blunted with reduction in glucokinase (GK) protein and glycogen synthase (GS) activity. The present study compared the impact of selective increases in dietary fat and fructose on liver glucose metabolism. Dogs consumed weight-maintaining chow (CTR) or hypercaloric high-fat (HFA) or high-fructose (HFR) diets diet for 4 wk before undergoing clamp studies with infusion of somatostatin and intraportal insulin (3-4 times basal) and glucagon (basal). The hepatic glucose load (HGL) was doubled during the clamp using peripheral vein (Pe) glucose infusion in the first 90 min (P1) and portal vein (4 mg·kg(-1)·min(-1)) plus Pe glucose infusion during the final 90 min (P2). During P2, HGU was 2.8 ± 0.2, 1.0 ± 0.2, and 0.8 ± 0.2 mg·kg(-1)·min(-1) in CTR, HFA, and HFR, respectively (P < 0.05 for HFA and HFR vs. CTR). Compared with CTR, hepatic GK protein and catalytic activity were reduced (P < 0.05) 35 and 56%, respectively, in HFA, and 53 and 74%, respectively, in HFR. Liver glycogen concentrations were 20 and 38% lower in HFA and HFR than CTR (P < 0.05). Hepatic Akt phosphorylation was decreased (P < 0.05) in HFA (21%) but not HFR. Thus, HFR impaired hepatic GK and glycogen more than HFA, whereas HFA reduced insulin signaling more than HFR. HFA and HFR effects were not additive, suggesting that they act via the same mechanism or their effects converge at a saturable step.
Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.
0 Communities
4 Members
2 Resources
14 MeSH Terms
Glucotoxicity targets hepatic glucokinase in Zucker diabetic fatty rats, a model of type 2 diabetes associated with obesity.
Ueta K, O'Brien TP, McCoy GA, Kim K, Healey EC, Farmer TD, Donahue EP, Condren AB, Printz RL, Shiota M
(2014) Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 306: E1225-38
MeSH Terms: Animals, Body Weight, Canagliflozin, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Eating, Glucagon, Glucokinase, Glucose, Glucose Clamp Technique, Glucosides, Hyperglycemia, Hyperinsulinism, Immunohistochemistry, Liver, Male, Obesity, Organ Size, Oxygen Consumption, RNA, Messenger, Rats, Rats, Zucker, Sodium-Glucose Transporter 2 Inhibitors, Thiophenes
Show Abstract · Added February 19, 2015
A loss of glucose effectiveness to suppress hepatic glucose production as well as increase hepatic glucose uptake and storage as glycogen is associated with a defective increase in glucose phosphorylation catalyzed by glucokinase (GK) in Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats. We extended these observations by investigating the role of persistent hyperglycemia (glucotoxicity) in the development of impaired hepatic GK activity in ZDF rats. We measured expression and localization of GK and GK regulatory protein (GKRP), translocation of GK, and hepatic glucose flux in response to a gastric mixed meal load (MMT) and hyperglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp after 1 or 6 wk of treatment with the sodium-glucose transporter 2 inhibitor (canaglifrozin) that was used to correct the persistent hyperglycemia of ZDF rats. Defective augmentation of glucose phosphorylation in response to a rise in plasma glucose in ZDF rats was associated with the coresidency of GKRP with GK in the cytoplasm in the midstage of diabetes, which was followed by a decrease in GK protein levels due to impaired posttranscriptional processing in the late stage of diabetes. Correcting hyperglycemia from the middle diabetic stage normalized the rate of glucose phosphorylation by maintaining GK protein levels, restoring normal nuclear residency of GK and GKRP under basal conditions and normalizing translocation of GK from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, with GKRP remaining in the nucleus in response to a rise in plasma glucose. This improved the liver's metabolic ability to respond to hyperglycemic hyperinsulinemia. Glucotoxicity is responsible for loss of glucose effectiveness and is associated with altered GK regulation in the ZDF rat.
Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
23 MeSH Terms
The effect of unhealthy β-cells on insulin secretion in pancreatic islets.
Pu Y, Lee S, Samuels DC, Watson LT, Cao Y
(2013) BMC Med Genomics 6 Suppl 3: S6
MeSH Terms: Algorithms, Animals, Cell Membrane, Computer Simulation, Cytoplasm, Glucokinase, Glucose, Glycolysis, Humans, Insulin, Insulin Secretion, Insulin-Secreting Cells, Islets of Langerhans, Mitochondria, Models, Biological
Show Abstract · Added May 27, 2014
BACKGROUND - Insulin secreted by pancreatic islet β-cells is the principal regulating hormone of glucose metabolism and plays a key role in controlling glucose level in blood. Impairment of the pancreatic islet function may cause glucose to accumulate in blood, and result in diabetes mellitus. Recent studies have shown that mitochondrial dysfunction has a strong negative effect on insulin secretion.
METHODS - In order to study the cause of dysfunction of pancreatic islets, a multiple cell model containing healthy and unhealthy cells is proposed based on an existing single cell model. A parameter that represents the function of mitochondria is modified for unhealthy cells. A 3-D hexagonal lattice structure is used to model the spatial differences among β-cells in a pancreatic islet. The β-cells in the model are connected through direct electrical connections between neighboring β-cells.
RESULTS - The simulation results show that the low ratio of total mitochondrial volume over cytoplasm volume per β-cell is a main reason that causes some mitochondria to lose their function. The results also show that the overall insulin secretion will be seriously disrupted when more than 15% of the β-cells in pancreatic islets become unhealthy.
CONCLUSION - Analysis of the model shows that the insulin secretion can be reinstated by increasing the glucokinase level. This new discovery sheds light on antidiabetic medication.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
15 MeSH Terms
Overnutrition induces β-cell differentiation through prolonged activation of β-cells in zebrafish larvae.
Li M, Maddison LA, Page-McCaw P, Chen W
(2014) Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab 306: E799-807
MeSH Terms: Animals, Animals, Genetically Modified, Calcium Channels, L-Type, Cell Count, Cell Differentiation, Disease Models, Animal, Embryo, Nonmammalian, Glucokinase, Insulin-Secreting Cells, KATP Channels, Larva, Membrane Potentials, Overnutrition, Potassium Channels, Inwardly Rectifying, Zebrafish
Show Abstract · Added April 24, 2014
Insulin from islet β-cells maintains glucose homeostasis by stimulating peripheral tissues to remove glucose from circulation. Persistent elevation of insulin demand increases β-cell number through self-replication or differentiation (neogenesis) as part of a compensatory response. However, it is not well understood how a persistent increase in insulin demand is detected. We have previously demonstrated that a persistent increase in insulin demand by overnutrition induces compensatory β-cell differentiation in zebrafish. Here, we use a series of pharmacological and genetic analyses to show that prolonged stimulation of existing β-cells is necessary and sufficient for this compensatory response. In the absence of feeding, tonic, but not intermittent, pharmacological activation of β-cell secretion was sufficient to induce β-cell differentiation. Conversely, drugs that block β-cell secretion, including an ATP-sensitive potassium (K ATP) channel agonist and an L-type Ca(2+) channel blocker, suppressed overnutrition-induced β-cell differentiation. Genetic experiments specifically targeting β-cells confirm existing β-cells as the overnutrition sensor. First, inducible expression of a constitutively active K ATP channel in β-cells suppressed the overnutrition effect. Second, inducible expression of a dominant-negative K ATP mutant induced β-cell differentiation independent of nutrients. Third, sensitizing β-cell metabolism by transgenic expression of a hyperactive glucokinase potentiated differentiation. Finally, ablation of the existing β-cells abolished the differentiation response. Taken together, these data establish that overnutrition induces β-cell differentiation in larval zebrafish through prolonged activation of β-cells. These findings demonstrate an essential role for existing β-cells in sensing overnutrition and compensating for their own insufficiency by recruiting additional β-cells.
0 Communities
2 Members
0 Resources
15 MeSH Terms
Type 2 diabetes and congenital hyperinsulinism cause DNA double-strand breaks and p53 activity in β cells.
Tornovsky-Babeay S, Dadon D, Ziv O, Tzipilevich E, Kadosh T, Schyr-Ben Haroush R, Hija A, Stolovich-Rain M, Furth-Lavi J, Granot Z, Porat S, Philipson LH, Herold KC, Bhatti TR, Stanley C, Ashcroft FM, In't Veld P, Saada A, Magnuson MA, Glaser B, Dor Y
(2014) Cell Metab 19: 109-21
MeSH Terms: Animals, Biomarkers, Calcineurin, Cell Death, Cell Proliferation, Congenital Hyperinsulinism, DNA Breaks, Double-Stranded, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Disease Models, Animal, Enzyme Activation, Enzyme Induction, Fasting, Glucagon-Like Peptide 1, Glucokinase, Glucose, Humans, Insulin-Secreting Cells, Membrane Potentials, Mice, Transgenes, Tumor Suppressor Protein p53
Show Abstract · Added February 11, 2014
β cell failure in type 2 diabetes (T2D) is associated with hyperglycemia, but the mechanisms are not fully understood. Congenital hyperinsulinism caused by glucokinase mutations (GCK-CHI) is associated with β cell replication and apoptosis. Here, we show that genetic activation of β cell glucokinase, initially triggering replication, causes apoptosis associated with DNA double-strand breaks and activation of the tumor suppressor p53. ATP-sensitive potassium channels (KATP channels) and calcineurin mediate this toxic effect. Toxicity of long-term glucokinase overactivity was confirmed by finding late-onset diabetes in older members of a GCK-CHI family. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) mimetic treatment or p53 deletion rescues β cells from glucokinase-induced death, but only GLP-1 analog rescues β cell function. DNA damage and p53 activity in T2D suggest shared mechanisms of β cell failure in hyperglycemia and CHI. Our results reveal membrane depolarization via KATP channels, calcineurin signaling, DNA breaks, and p53 as determinants of β cell glucotoxicity and suggest pharmacological approaches to enhance β cell survival in diabetes.
Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
2 Communities
1 Members
1 Resources
21 MeSH Terms
Hepatic glucose metabolism in late pregnancy: normal versus high-fat and -fructose diet.
Coate KC, Smith MS, Shiota M, Irimia JM, Roach PJ, Farmer B, Williams PE, Moore MC
(2013) Diabetes 62: 753-61
MeSH Terms: Animals, Diabetes, Gestational, Diet, High-Fat, Disease Models, Animal, Dogs, Down-Regulation, Female, Fructose, Glucokinase, Glucose, Glucose Intolerance, Glycogen Phosphorylase, Liver Form, Glycogen Synthase, Hyperglycemia, Insulin Resistance, Liver, Liver Glycogen, Maternal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena, Postprandial Period, Pregnancy
Show Abstract · Added June 2, 2014
Net hepatic glucose uptake (NHGU) is an important contributor to postprandial glycemic control. We hypothesized that NHGU is reduced during normal pregnancy and in a pregnant diet-induced model of impaired glucose intolerance/gestational diabetes mellitus (IGT/GDM). Dogs (n = 7 per group) that were nonpregnant (N), normal pregnant (P), or pregnant with IGT/GDM (pregnant dogs fed a high-fat and -fructose diet [P-HFF]) underwent a hyperinsulinemic-hyperglycemic clamp with intraportal glucose infusion. Clamp period insulin, glucagon, and glucose concentrations and hepatic glucose loads did not differ among groups. The N dogs reached near-maximal NHGU rates within 30 min; mean ± SEM NHGU was 105 ± 9 µmol·100 g liver⁻¹·min⁻¹. The P and P-HFF dogs reached maximal NHGU in 90-120 min; their NHGU was blunted (68 ± 9 and 16 ± 17 µmol·100 g liver⁻¹·min⁻¹, respectively). Hepatic glycogen synthesis was reduced 20% in P versus N and 40% in P-HFF versus P dogs. This was associated with a reduction (>70%) in glycogen synthase activity in P-HFF versus P and increased glycogen phosphorylase (GP) activity in both P (1.7-fold greater than N) and P-HFF (1.8-fold greater than P) dogs. Thus, NHGU under conditions mimicking the postprandial state is delayed and suppressed in normal pregnancy, with concomitant reduction in glycogen storage. NHGU is further blunted in IGT/GDM. This likely contributes to postprandial hyperglycemia during pregnancy, with potential adverse outcomes for the fetus and mother.
0 Communities
2 Members
0 Resources
20 MeSH Terms
Portal vein glucose entry triggers a coordinated cellular response that potentiates hepatic glucose uptake and storage in normal but not high-fat/high-fructose-fed dogs.
Coate KC, Kraft G, Irimia JM, Smith MS, Farmer B, Neal DW, Roach PJ, Shiota M, Cherrington AD
(2013) Diabetes 62: 392-400
MeSH Terms: Animals, Diet, High-Fat, Dogs, Fructose, Glucokinase, Glucose, Glucose Intolerance, Glycogen Synthase, Hyperglycemia, Hyperinsulinism, Liver, Liver Glycogen, Male, Portal Vein, Signal Transduction
Show Abstract · Added December 5, 2013
The cellular events mediating the pleiotropic actions of portal vein glucose (PoG) delivery on hepatic glucose disposition have not been clearly defined. Likewise, the molecular defects associated with postprandial hyperglycemia and impaired hepatic glucose uptake (HGU) following consumption of a high-fat, high-fructose diet (HFFD) are unknown. Our goal was to identify hepatocellular changes elicited by hyperinsulinemia, hyperglycemia, and PoG signaling in normal chow-fed (CTR) and HFFD-fed dogs. In CTR dogs, we demonstrated that PoG infusion in the presence of hyperinsulinemia and hyperglycemia triggered an increase in the activity of hepatic glucokinase (GK) and glycogen synthase (GS), which occurred in association with further augmentation in HGU and glycogen synthesis (GSYN) in vivo. In contrast, 4 weeks of HFFD feeding markedly reduced GK protein content and impaired the activation of GS in association with diminished HGU and GSYN in vivo. Furthermore, the enzymatic changes associated with PoG sensing in chow-fed animals were abolished in HFFD-fed animals, consistent with loss of the stimulatory effects of PoG delivery. These data reveal new insight into the molecular physiology of the portal glucose signaling mechanism under normal conditions and to the pathophysiology of aberrant postprandial hepatic glucose disposition evident under a diet-induced glucose-intolerant condition.
1 Communities
3 Members
1 Resources
15 MeSH Terms
Interaction between the central and peripheral effects of insulin in controlling hepatic glucose metabolism in the conscious dog.
Ramnanan CJ, Kraft G, Smith MS, Farmer B, Neal D, Williams PE, Lautz M, Farmer T, Donahue EP, Cherrington AD, Edgerton DS
(2013) Diabetes 62: 74-84
MeSH Terms: Animals, Brain, Dogs, Female, Glucokinase, Glucose, Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3, Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3 beta, Glycogenolysis, Hypothalamus, Insulin, Liver, Male, Phosphorylation, STAT3 Transcription Factor
Show Abstract · Added February 13, 2015
The importance of hypothalamic insulin action to the regulation of hepatic glucose metabolism in the presence of a normal liver/brain insulin ratio (3:1) is unknown. Thus, we assessed the role of central insulin action in the response of the liver to normal physiologic hyperinsulinemia over 4 h. Using a pancreatic clamp, hepatic portal vein insulin delivery was increased three- or eightfold in the conscious dog. Insulin action was studied in the presence or absence of intracerebroventricularly mediated blockade of hypothalamic insulin action. Euglycemia was maintained, and glucagon was clamped at basal. Both the molecular and metabolic aspects of insulin action were assessed. Blockade of hypothalamic insulin signaling did not alter the insulin-mediated suppression of hepatic gluconeogenic gene transcription but blunted the induction of glucokinase gene transcription and completely blocked the inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3β gene transcription. Thus, central and peripheral insulin action combined to control some, but not other, hepatic enzyme programs. Nevertheless, inhibition of hypothalamic insulin action did not alter the effects of the hormone on hepatic glucose flux (production or uptake). These data indicate that brain insulin action is not a determinant of the rapid (<4 h) inhibition of hepatic glucose metabolism caused by normal physiologic hyperinsulinemia in this large animal model.
0 Communities
4 Members
0 Resources
15 MeSH Terms
Clinical assessment of HNF1A and GCK variants and identification of a novel mutation causing MODY2.
Shoemaker AH, Zienkiewicz J, Moore DJ
(2012) Diabetes Res Clin Pract 96: e36-9
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Female, Glucokinase, Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 1-alpha, Humans, Mutation
Show Abstract · Added October 24, 2013
A child with impaired fasting glucose was found to be heterozygous for a novel variant at c.659G>A in GCK and a variant at c.1663C>T in HNF1A. Structural modeling and clinical correlation suggests that the GCK variant causes monogenic diabetes while the variant in HNF1A is unlikely to be pathogenic.
Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
0 Communities
2 Members
0 Resources
7 MeSH Terms
Control of pancreatic β cell regeneration by glucose metabolism.
Porat S, Weinberg-Corem N, Tornovsky-Babaey S, Schyr-Ben-Haroush R, Hija A, Stolovich-Rain M, Dadon D, Granot Z, Ben-Hur V, White P, Girard CA, Karni R, Kaestner KH, Ashcroft FM, Magnuson MA, Saada A, Grimsby J, Glaser B, Dor Y
(2011) Cell Metab 13: 440-449
MeSH Terms: Animals, Blood Glucose, Cell Membrane, Cell Proliferation, Glucokinase, Glycolysis, Insulin-Secreting Cells, KATP Channels, Mice, Regeneration
Show Abstract · Added January 8, 2012
Recent studies revealed a surprising regenerative capacity of insulin-producing β cells in mice, suggesting that regenerative therapy for human diabetes could in principle be achieved. Physiologic β cell regeneration under stressed conditions relies on accelerated proliferation of surviving β cells, but the factors that trigger and control this response remain unclear. Using islet transplantation experiments, we show that β cell mass is controlled systemically rather than by local factors such as tissue damage. Chronic changes in β cell glucose metabolism, rather than blood glucose levels per se, are the main positive regulator of basal and compensatory β cell proliferation in vivo. Intracellularly, genetic and pharmacologic manipulations reveal that glucose induces β cell replication via metabolism by glucokinase, the first step of glycolysis, followed by closure of K(ATP) channels and membrane depolarization. Our data provide a molecular mechanism for homeostatic control of β cell mass by metabolic demand.
Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
1 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
10 MeSH Terms