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Bid maintains mitochondrial cristae structure and function and protects against cardiac disease in an integrative genomics study.
Salisbury-Ruf CT, Bertram CC, Vergeade A, Lark DS, Shi Q, Heberling ML, Fortune NL, Okoye GD, Jerome WG, Wells QS, Fessel J, Moslehi J, Chen H, Roberts LJ, Boutaud O, Gamazon ER, Zinkel SS
(2018) Elife 7:
MeSH Terms: Animals, Apoptosis, BH3 Interacting Domain Death Agonist Protein, Beclin-1, Cell Respiration, Fibrosis, Gene Expression Regulation, Genome-Wide Association Study, Genomics, Heart Diseases, Heart Ventricles, Humans, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mitochondria, Mitochondrial Proton-Translocating ATPases, Mutation, Myeloid Progenitor Cells, Myocardial Infarction, Myocytes, Cardiac, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Protein Multimerization, Protein Structure, Secondary, Protein Subunits, Reactive Oxygen Species, Reproducibility of Results, Up-Regulation
Show Abstract · Added December 11, 2018
Bcl-2 family proteins reorganize mitochondrial membranes during apoptosis, to form pores and rearrange cristae. In vitro and in vivo analysis integrated with human genetics reveals a novel homeostatic mitochondrial function for Bcl-2 family protein Bid. Loss of full-length Bid results in apoptosis-independent, irregular cristae with decreased respiration. mice display stress-induced myocardial dysfunction and damage. A gene-based approach applied to a biobank, validated in two independent GWAS studies, reveals that decreased genetically determined BID expression associates with myocardial infarction (MI) susceptibility. Patients in the bottom 5% of the expression distribution exhibit >4 fold increased MI risk. Carrier status with nonsynonymous variation in Bid's membrane binding domain, Bid, associates with MI predisposition. Furthermore, Bid but not Bid associates with Mcl-1, previously implicated in cristae stability; decreased MCL-1 expression associates with MI. Our results identify a role for Bid in homeostatic mitochondrial cristae reorganization, that we link to human cardiac disease.
© 2018, Salisbury-Ruf et al.
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26 MeSH Terms
An Integrated, High-Throughput Strategy for Multiomic Systems Level Analysis.
Gutierrez DB, Gant-Branum RL, Romer CE, Farrow MA, Allen JL, Dahal N, Nei YW, Codreanu SG, Jordan AT, Palmer LD, Sherrod SD, McLean JA, Skaar EP, Norris JL, Caprioli RM
(2018) J Proteome Res 17: 3396-3408
MeSH Terms: Gene Expression Profiling, Genomics, HL-60 Cells, Humans, Metabolomics, NF-E2-Related Factor 2, NF-kappa B, Proteomics, Signal Transduction, Systems Biology, Zinc
Show Abstract · Added August 27, 2018
Proteomics, metabolomics, and transcriptomics generate comprehensive data sets, and current biocomputational capabilities allow their efficient integration for systems biology analysis. Published multiomics studies cover methodological advances as well as applications to biological questions. However, few studies have focused on the development of a high-throughput, unified sample preparation approach to complement high-throughput omic analytics. This report details the automation, benchmarking, and application of a strategy for transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic analyses from a common sample. The approach, sample preparation for multi-omics technologies (SPOT), provides equivalent performance to typical individual omic preparation methods but greatly enhances throughput and minimizes the resources required for multiomic experiments. SPOT was applied to a multiomics time course experiment for zinc-treated HL-60 cells. The data reveal Zn effects on NRF2 antioxidant and NFkappaB signaling. High-throughput approaches such as these are critical for the acquisition of temporally resolved, multicondition, large multiomic data sets such as those necessary to assess complex clinical and biological concerns. Ultimately, this type of approach will provide an expanded understanding of challenging scientific questions across many fields.
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11 MeSH Terms
Interdisciplinary Models for Research and Clinical Endeavors in Genomic Medicine: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association.
Musunuru K, Arora P, Cooke JP, Ferguson JF, Hershberger RE, Hickey KT, Lee JM, Lima JAC, Loscalzo J, Pereira NL, Russell MW, Shah SH, Sheikh F, Wang TJ, MacRae CA, American Heart Association Council on Genomic and Precision Medicine; Council on Cardiovascular Disease in the Young; Council on Cardiovascular and Stroke Nursing; Council on Cardiovascular Radiology and Intervention; Council on Peripheral Vascular Disease; Council on Quality of Care and Outcomes Research; and Stroke Council
(2018) Circ Genom Precis Med 11: e000046
MeSH Terms: American Heart Association, Biomedical Research, Cardiovascular Diseases, Electronic Health Records, Genomics, Humans, Interdisciplinary Studies, Precision Medicine, United States
Show Abstract · Added April 2, 2019
The completion of the Human Genome Project has unleashed a wealth of human genomics information, but it remains unclear how best to implement this information for the benefit of patients. The standard approach of biomedical research, with researchers pursuing advances in knowledge in the laboratory and, separately, clinicians translating research findings into the clinic as much as decades later, will need to give way to new interdisciplinary models for research in genomic medicine. These models should include scientists and clinicians actively working as teams to study patients and populations recruited in clinical settings and communities to make genomics discoveries-through the combined efforts of data scientists, clinical researchers, epidemiologists, and basic scientists-and to rapidly apply these discoveries in the clinic for the prediction, prevention, diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of cardiovascular diseases and stroke. The highly publicized US Precision Medicine Initiative, also known as All of Us, is a large-scale program funded by the US National Institutes of Health that will energize these efforts, but several ongoing studies such as the UK Biobank Initiative; the Million Veteran Program; the Electronic Medical Records and Genomics Network; the Kaiser Permanente Research Program on Genes, Environment and Health; and the DiscovEHR collaboration are already providing exemplary models of this kind of interdisciplinary work. In this statement, we outline the opportunities and challenges in broadly implementing new interdisciplinary models in academic medical centers and community settings and bringing the promise of genomics to fruition.
© 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.
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9 MeSH Terms
Calcium channel blockers as drug repurposing candidates for gestational diabetes: Mining large scale genomic and electronic health records data to repurpose medications.
Goldstein JA, Bastarache LA, Denny JC, Roden DM, Pulley JM, Aronoff DM
(2018) Pharmacol Res 130: 44-51
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Calcium Channel Blockers, Data Mining, Diabetes, Gestational, Drug Repositioning, Electronic Health Records, Female, Genomics, Humans, Middle Aged, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Pregnancy, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
New therapeutic approaches are needed for gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), but must show safety and efficacy in a historically understudied population. We studied associations between electronic medical record (EMR) phenotypes and genetic variants to uncover drugs currently considered safe in pregnancy that could treat or prevent GDM. We identified 129 systemically active drugs considered safe in pregnancy targeting the proteins produced from 196 genes. We tested for associations between GDM and/or type 2 diabetes (DM2) and 306 SNPs in 130 genes represented on the Illumina Infinium Human Exome Bead Chip (DM2 was included due to shared pathophysiological features with GDM). In parallel, we tested the association between drugs and glucose tolerance during pregnancy as measured by the glucose recorded during a routine 50-g glucose tolerance test (GTT). We found an association between GDM/DM2 and the genes targeted by 11 drug classes. In the EMR analysis, 6 drug classes were associated with changes in GTT. Two classes were identified in both analyses. L-type calcium channel blocking antihypertensives (CCBs), were associated with a 3.18 mg/dL (95% CI -6.18 to -0.18) decrease in glucose during GTT, and serotonin receptor type 3 (5HT-3) antagonist antinausea medications were associated with a 3.54 mg/dL (95% CI 1.86-5.23) increase in glucose during GTT. CCBs were identified as a class of drugs considered safe in pregnancy could have efficacy in treating or preventing GDM. 5HT-3 antagonists may be associated with worse glucose tolerance.
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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14 MeSH Terms
An integrative functional genomics framework for effective identification of novel regulatory variants in genome-phenome studies.
Zhao J, Cheng F, Jia P, Cox N, Denny JC, Zhao Z
(2018) Genome Med 10: 7
MeSH Terms: Gene Regulatory Networks, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Genome, Human, Genome-Wide Association Study, Genomics, Humans, Molecular Sequence Annotation, Organ Specificity, Phenotype, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Promoter Regions, Genetic, Transcription Factors
Show Abstract · Added March 14, 2018
BACKGROUND - Genome-phenome studies have identified thousands of variants that are statistically associated with disease or traits; however, their functional roles are largely unclear. A comprehensive investigation of regulatory mechanisms and the gene regulatory networks between phenome-wide association study (PheWAS) and genome-wide association study (GWAS) is needed to identify novel regulatory variants contributing to risk for human diseases.
METHODS - In this study, we developed an integrative functional genomics framework that maps 215,107 significant single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) traits generated from the PheWAS Catalog and 28,870 genome-wide significant SNP traits collected from the GWAS Catalog into a global human genome regulatory map via incorporating various functional annotation data, including transcription factor (TF)-based motifs, promoters, enhancers, and expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) generated from four major functional genomics databases: FANTOM5, ENCODE, NIH Roadmap, and Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx). In addition, we performed a tissue-specific regulatory circuit analysis through the integration of the identified regulatory variants and tissue-specific gene expression profiles in 7051 samples across 32 tissues from GTEx.
RESULTS - We found that the disease-associated loci in both the PheWAS and GWAS Catalogs were significantly enriched with functional SNPs. The integration of functional annotations significantly improved the power of detecting novel associations in PheWAS, through which we found a number of functional associations with strong regulatory evidence in the PheWAS Catalog. Finally, we constructed tissue-specific regulatory circuits for several complex traits: mental diseases, autoimmune diseases, and cancer, via exploring tissue-specific TF-promoter/enhancer-target gene interaction networks. We uncovered several promising tissue-specific regulatory TFs or genes for Alzheimer's disease (e.g. ZIC1 and STX1B) and asthma (e.g. CSF3 and IL1RL1).
CONCLUSIONS - This study offers powerful tools for exploring the functional consequences of variants generated from genome-phenome association studies in terms of their mechanisms on affecting multiple complex diseases and traits.
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12 MeSH Terms
Drivers of genetic diversity in secondary metabolic gene clusters within a fungal species.
Lind AL, Wisecaver JH, Lameiras C, Wiemann P, Palmer JM, Keller NP, Rodrigues F, Goldman GH, Rokas A
(2017) PLoS Biol 15: e2003583
MeSH Terms: Alleles, Aspergillus fumigatus, Biological Evolution, Fungal Proteins, Fungi, Genetic Variation, Genome, Fungal, Genomics, Metabolic Networks and Pathways, Multigene Family, Mutation, Polymorphism, Genetic, Secondary Metabolism
Show Abstract · Added March 21, 2018
Filamentous fungi produce a diverse array of secondary metabolites (SMs) critical for defense, virulence, and communication. The metabolic pathways that produce SMs are found in contiguous gene clusters in fungal genomes, an atypical arrangement for metabolic pathways in other eukaryotes. Comparative studies of filamentous fungal species have shown that SM gene clusters are often either highly divergent or uniquely present in one or a handful of species, hampering efforts to determine the genetic basis and evolutionary drivers of SM gene cluster divergence. Here, we examined SM variation in 66 cosmopolitan strains of a single species, the opportunistic human pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus. Investigation of genome-wide within-species variation revealed 5 general types of variation in SM gene clusters: nonfunctional gene polymorphisms; gene gain and loss polymorphisms; whole cluster gain and loss polymorphisms; allelic polymorphisms, in which different alleles corresponded to distinct, nonhomologous clusters; and location polymorphisms, in which a cluster was found to differ in its genomic location across strains. These polymorphisms affect the function of representative A. fumigatus SM gene clusters, such as those involved in the production of gliotoxin, fumigaclavine, and helvolic acid as well as the function of clusters with undefined products. In addition to enabling the identification of polymorphisms, the detection of which requires extensive genome-wide synteny conservation (e.g., mobile gene clusters and nonhomologous cluster alleles), our approach also implicated multiple underlying genetic drivers, including point mutations, recombination, and genomic deletion and insertion events as well as horizontal gene transfer from distant fungi. Finally, most of the variants that we uncover within A. fumigatus have been previously hypothesized to contribute to SM gene cluster diversity across entire fungal classes and phyla. We suggest that the drivers of genetic diversity operating within a fungal species shown here are sufficient to explain SM cluster macroevolutionary patterns.
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13 MeSH Terms
Landscape of X chromosome inactivation across human tissues.
Tukiainen T, Villani AC, Yen A, Rivas MA, Marshall JL, Satija R, Aguirre M, Gauthier L, Fleharty M, Kirby A, Cummings BB, Castel SE, Karczewski KJ, Aguet F, Byrnes A, GTEx Consortium, Laboratory, Data Analysis &Coordinating Center (LDACC)—Analysis Working Group, Statistical Methods groups—Analysis Working Group, Enhancing GTEx (eGTEx) groups, NIH Common Fund, NIH/NCI, NIH/NHGRI, NIH/NIMH, NIH/NIDA, Biospecimen Collection Source Site—NDRI, Biospecimen Collection Source Site—RPCI, Biospecimen Core Resource—VARI, Brain Bank Repository—University of Miami Brain Endowment Bank, Leidos Biomedical—Project Management, ELSI Study, Genome Browser Data Integration &Visualization—EBI, Genome Browser Data Integration &Visualization—UCSC Genomics Institute, University of California Santa Cruz, Lappalainen T, Regev A, Ardlie KG, Hacohen N, MacArthur DG
(2017) Nature 550: 244-248
MeSH Terms: Chromosomes, Human, X, Female, Genes, X-Linked, Genome, Human, Genomics, Humans, Male, Organ Specificity, Phenotype, Sequence Analysis, RNA, Single-Cell Analysis, Transcriptome, X Chromosome Inactivation
Show Abstract · Added October 27, 2017
X chromosome inactivation (XCI) silences transcription from one of the two X chromosomes in female mammalian cells to balance expression dosage between XX females and XY males. XCI is, however, incomplete in humans: up to one-third of X-chromosomal genes are expressed from both the active and inactive X chromosomes (Xa and Xi, respectively) in female cells, with the degree of 'escape' from inactivation varying between genes and individuals. The extent to which XCI is shared between cells and tissues remains poorly characterized, as does the degree to which incomplete XCI manifests as detectable sex differences in gene expression and phenotypic traits. Here we describe a systematic survey of XCI, integrating over 5,500 transcriptomes from 449 individuals spanning 29 tissues from GTEx (v6p release) and 940 single-cell transcriptomes, combined with genomic sequence data. We show that XCI at 683 X-chromosomal genes is generally uniform across human tissues, but identify examples of heterogeneity between tissues, individuals and cells. We show that incomplete XCI affects at least 23% of X-chromosomal genes, identify seven genes that escape XCI with support from multiple lines of evidence and demonstrate that escape from XCI results in sex biases in gene expression, establishing incomplete XCI as a mechanism that is likely to introduce phenotypic diversity. Overall, this updated catalogue of XCI across human tissues helps to increase our understanding of the extent and impact of the incompleteness in the maintenance of XCI.
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13 MeSH Terms
The impact of rare variation on gene expression across tissues.
Li X, Kim Y, Tsang EK, Davis JR, Damani FN, Chiang C, Hess GT, Zappala Z, Strober BJ, Scott AJ, Li A, Ganna A, Bassik MC, Merker JD, GTEx Consortium, Laboratory, Data Analysis &Coordinating Center (LDACC)—Analysis Working Group, Statistical Methods groups—Analysis Working Group, Enhancing GTEx (eGTEx) groups, NIH Common Fund, NIH/NCI, NIH/NHGRI, NIH/NIMH, NIH/NIDA, Biospecimen Collection Source Site—NDRI, Biospecimen Collection Source Site—RPCI, Biospecimen Core Resource—VARI, Brain Bank Repository—University of Miami Brain Endowment Bank, Leidos Biomedical—Project Management, ELSI Study, Genome Browser Data Integration &Visualization—EBI, Genome Browser Data Integration &Visualization—UCSC Genomics Institute, University of California Santa Cruz, Hall IM, Battle A, Montgomery SB
(2017) Nature 550: 239-243
MeSH Terms: Bayes Theorem, Female, Gene Expression Profiling, Genetic Variation, Genome, Human, Genomics, Genotype, Humans, Male, Models, Genetic, Organ Specificity, Sequence Analysis, RNA
Show Abstract · Added October 27, 2017
Rare genetic variants are abundant in humans and are expected to contribute to individual disease risk. While genetic association studies have successfully identified common genetic variants associated with susceptibility, these studies are not practical for identifying rare variants. Efforts to distinguish pathogenic variants from benign rare variants have leveraged the genetic code to identify deleterious protein-coding alleles, but no analogous code exists for non-coding variants. Therefore, ascertaining which rare variants have phenotypic effects remains a major challenge. Rare non-coding variants have been associated with extreme gene expression in studies using single tissues, but their effects across tissues are unknown. Here we identify gene expression outliers, or individuals showing extreme expression levels for a particular gene, across 44 human tissues by using combined analyses of whole genomes and multi-tissue RNA-sequencing data from the Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) project v6p release. We find that 58% of underexpression and 28% of overexpression outliers have nearby conserved rare variants compared to 8% of non-outliers. Additionally, we developed RIVER (RNA-informed variant effect on regulation), a Bayesian statistical model that incorporates expression data to predict a regulatory effect for rare variants with higher accuracy than models using genomic annotations alone. Overall, we demonstrate that rare variants contribute to large gene expression changes across tissues and provide an integrative method for interpretation of rare variants in individual genomes.
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12 MeSH Terms
Identifying -mediators for -eQTLs across many human tissues using genomic mediation analysis.
Yang F, Wang J, GTEx Consortium, Pierce BL, Chen LS
(2017) Genome Res 27: 1859-1871
MeSH Terms: Databases, Genetic, Gene Expression Profiling, Gene Expression Regulation, Gene Regulatory Networks, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Genome-Wide Association Study, Genomics, Humans, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Quantitative Trait Loci, Selection, Genetic, Tissue Distribution
Show Abstract · Added November 29, 2017
The impact of inherited genetic variation on gene expression in humans is well-established. The majority of known expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) impact expression of local genes (-eQTLs). More research is needed to identify effects of genetic variation on distant genes (-eQTLs) and understand their biological mechanisms. One common -eQTLs mechanism is "mediation" by a local () transcript. Thus, mediation analysis can be applied to genome-wide SNP and expression data in order to identify transcripts that are "-mediators" of -eQTLs, including those "-hubs" involved in regulation of many -genes. Identifying such mediators helps us understand regulatory networks and suggests biological mechanisms underlying -eQTLs, both of which are relevant for understanding susceptibility to complex diseases. The multitissue expression data from the Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) program provides a unique opportunity to study -mediation across human tissue types. However, the presence of complex hidden confounding effects in biological systems can make mediation analyses challenging and prone to confounding bias, particularly when conducted among diverse samples. To address this problem, we propose a new method: Genomic Mediation analysis with Adaptive Confounding adjustment (GMAC). It enables the search of a very large pool of variables, and adaptively selects potential confounding variables for each mediation test. Analyses of simulated data and GTEx data demonstrate that the adaptive selection of confounders by GMAC improves the power and precision of mediation analysis. Application of GMAC to GTEx data provides new insights into the observed patterns of -hubs and -eQTL regulation across tissue types.
© 2017 Yang et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.
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12 MeSH Terms
Controlling the signal: Practical privacy protection of genomic data sharing through Beacon services.
Wan Z, Vorobeychik Y, Kantarcioglu M, Malin B
(2017) BMC Med Genomics 10: 39
MeSH Terms: Computer Security, Gene Frequency, Genomics, Humans, Information Dissemination
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2018
BACKGROUND - Genomic data is increasingly collected by a wide array of organizations. As such, there is a growing demand to make summary information about such collections available more widely. However, over the past decade, a series of investigations have shown that attacks, rooted in statistical inference methods, can be applied to discern the presence of a known individual's DNA sequence in the pool of subjects. Recently, it was shown that the Beacon Project of the Global Alliance for Genomics and Health, a web service for querying about the presence (or absence) of a specific allele, was vulnerable. The Integrating Data for Analysis, Anonymization, and Sharing (iDASH) Center modeled a track in their third Privacy Protection Challenge on how to mitigate the Beacon vulnerability. We developed the winning solution for this track.
METHODS - This paper describes our computational method to optimize the tradeoff between the utility and the privacy of the Beacon service. We generalize the genomic data sharing problem beyond that which was introduced in the iDASH Challenge to be more representative of real world scenarios to allow for a more comprehensive evaluation. We then conduct a sensitivity analysis of our method with respect to several state-of-the-art methods using a dataset of 400,000 positions in Chromosome 10 for 500 individuals from Phase 3 of the 1000 Genomes Project. All methods are evaluated for utility, privacy and efficiency.
RESULTS - Our method achieves better performance than all state-of-the-art methods, irrespective of how key factors (e.g., the allele frequency in the population, the size of the pool and utility weights) change from the original parameters of the problem. We further illustrate that it is possible for our method to exhibit subpar performance under special cases of allele query sequences. However, we show our method can be extended to address this issue when the query sequence is fixed and known a priori to the data custodian, so that they may plan stage their responses accordingly.
CONCLUSIONS - This research shows that it is possible to thwart the attack on Beacon services, without substantially altering the utility of the system, using computational methods. The method we initially developed is limited by the design of the scenario and evaluation protocol for the iDASH Challenge; however, it can be improved by allowing the data custodian to act in a staged manner.
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