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Multistate design of influenza antibodies improves affinity and breadth against seasonal viruses.
Sevy AM, Wu NC, Gilchuk IM, Parrish EH, Burger S, Yousif D, Nagel MBM, Schey KL, Wilson IA, Crowe JE, Meiler J
(2019) Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 116: 1597-1602
MeSH Terms: Amino Acid Sequence, Antibodies, Neutralizing, Antibodies, Viral, Crystallography, X-Ray, Hemagglutinin Glycoproteins, Influenza Virus, Humans, Influenza A virus, Influenza, Human, Seasons
Show Abstract · Added March 31, 2019
Influenza is a yearly threat to global public health. Rapid changes in influenza surface proteins resulting from antigenic drift and shift events make it difficult to readily identify antibodies with broadly neutralizing activity against different influenza subtypes with high frequency, specifically antibodies targeting the receptor binding domain (RBD) on influenza HA protein. We developed an optimized computational design method that is able to optimize an antibody for recognition of large panels of antigens. To demonstrate the utility of this multistate design method, we used it to redesign an antiinfluenza antibody against a large panel of more than 500 seasonal HA antigens of the H1 subtype. As a proof of concept, we tested this method on a variety of known antiinfluenza antibodies and identified those that could be improved computationally. We generated redesigned variants of antibody C05 to the HA RBD and experimentally characterized variants that exhibited improved breadth and affinity against our panel. C05 mutants exhibited improved affinity for three of the subtypes used in design by stabilizing the CDRH3 loop and creating favorable electrostatic interactions with the antigen. These mutants possess increased breadth and affinity of binding while maintaining high-affinity binding to existing targets, surpassing a major limitation up to this point.
Copyright © 2019 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.
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Functional and structural similarity of human DNA primase [4Fe4S] cluster domain constructs.
Holt ME, Salay LE, O'Brien E, Barton JK, Chazin WJ
(2018) PLoS One 13: e0209345
MeSH Terms: Binding Sites, Circular Dichroism, Crystallography, X-Ray, DNA, DNA Primase, Molecular Docking Simulation, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Biomolecular, Oxidation-Reduction, Protein Binding, Protein Domains, Protein Structure, Secondary, RNA
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
The regulatory subunit of human DNA primase has a C-terminal domain (p58C) that contains a [4Fe4S] cluster and binds DNA. Previous electrochemical analysis of a p58C construct revealed that its affinity for DNA is sensitive to the redox state of the [4Fe4S] cluster. Concerns about the validity of this conclusion have been raised, based in part on differences in X-ray crystal structures of the p58C272-464 construct used for that study and that of a N-terminally shifted p58C266-456 construct and consequently, an assumption that p58C272-464 has abnormal physical and functional properties. To address this controversy, a new p58C266-464 construct containing all residues was crystallized under the conditions previously used for crystallizing p58C272-464, and the solution structures of both constructs were assessed using circular dichroism and NMR spectroscopy. In the new crystal structure, p58C266-464 exhibits the same elements of secondary structure near the DNA binding site as observed in the crystal structure of p58C272-464. Moreover, in solution, circular dichroism and 15N,1H-heteronuclear single quantum coherence (HSQC) NMR spectra show there are no significant differences in the distribution of secondary structures or in the tertiary structure or the two constructs. To validate that the two constructs have the same functional properties, binding of a primed DNA template was measured using a fluorescence-based DNA binding assay, and the affinities for this substrate were the same (3.4 ± 0.5 μM and 2.7 ± 0.3 μM, respectively). The electrochemical properties of p58C266-464 were also measured and this p58C construct was able to engage in redox switching on DNA with the same efficiency as p58C272-464. Together, these results show that although p58C can be stabilized in different conformations in the crystalline state, in solution there is effectively no difference in the structure and functional properties of p58C constructs of different lengths.
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12 MeSH Terms
Yeast require redox switching in DNA primase.
O'Brien E, Salay LE, Epum EA, Friedman KL, Chazin WJ, Barton JK
(2018) Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 115: 13186-13191
MeSH Terms: Crystallography, X-Ray, DNA Primase, Electron Transport, Iron-Sulfur Proteins, Models, Molecular, Mutation, Oxidation-Reduction, Protein Conformation, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Saccharomyces cerevisiae Proteins
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
Eukaryotic DNA primases contain a [4Fe4S] cluster in the C-terminal domain of the p58 subunit (p58C) that affects substrate affinity but is not required for catalysis. We show that, in yeast primase, the cluster serves as a DNA-mediated redox switch governing DNA binding, just as in human primase. Despite a different structural arrangement of tyrosines to facilitate electron transfer between the DNA substrate and [4Fe4S] cluster, in yeast, mutation of tyrosines Y395 and Y397 alters the same electron transfer chemistry and redox switch. Mutation of conserved tyrosine 395 diminishes the extent of p58C participation in normal redox-switching reactions, whereas mutation of conserved tyrosine 397 causes oxidative cluster degradation to the [3Fe4S] species during p58C redox signaling. Switching between oxidized and reduced states in the presence of the Y397 mutations thus puts primase [4Fe4S] cluster integrity and function at risk. Consistent with these observations, we find that yeast tolerate mutations to Y395 in p58C, but the single-residue mutation Y397L in p58C is lethal. Our data thus show that a constellation of tyrosines for protein-DNA electron transfer mediates the redox switch in eukaryotic primases and is required for primase function in vivo.
Copyright © 2018 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.
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The Structure of the Bifunctional Everninomicin Biosynthetic Enzyme EvdMO1 Suggests Independent Activity of the Fused Methyltransferase-Oxidase Domains.
Starbird CA, Perry NA, Chen Q, Berndt S, Yamakawa I, Loukachevitch LV, Limbrick EM, Bachmann BO, Iverson TM, McCulloch KM
(2018) Biochemistry 57: 6827-6837
MeSH Terms: Amino Acid Sequence, Aminoglycosides, Bacterial Proteins, Biosynthetic Pathways, Catalytic Domain, Conserved Sequence, Crystallography, X-Ray, Gene Fusion, Genes, Bacterial, Methyltransferases, Micromonospora, Models, Molecular, Oxygenases, Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs, Sequence Homology, Amino Acid
Show Abstract · Added April 1, 2019
Members of the orthosomycin family of natural products are decorated polysaccharides with potent antibiotic activity and complex biosynthetic pathways. The defining feature of the orthosomycins is an orthoester linkage between carbohydrate moieties that is necessary for antibiotic activity and is likely formed by a family of conserved oxygenases. Everninomicins are octasaccharide orthosomycins produced by Micromonospora carbonacea that have two orthoester linkages and a methylenedioxy bridge, three features whose formation logically requires oxidative chemistry. Correspondingly, the evd gene cluster encoding everninomicin D encodes two monofunctional nonheme iron, α-ketoglutarate-dependent oxygenases and one bifunctional enzyme with an N-terminal methyltransferase domain and a C-terminal oxygenase domain. To investigate whether the activities of these domains are linked in the bifunctional enzyme EvdMO1, we determined the structure of the N-terminal methyltransferase domain to 1.1 Å and that of the full-length protein to 3.35 Å resolution. Both domains of EvdMO1 adopt the canonical folds of their respective superfamilies and are connected by a short linker. Each domain's active site is oriented such that it faces away from the other domain, and there is no evidence of a channel connecting the two. Our results support EvdMO1 working as a bifunctional enzyme with independent catalytic activities.
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15 MeSH Terms
Structural Biology of the HEAT-Like Repeat Family of DNA Glycosylases.
Shi R, Shen XX, Rokas A, Eichman BF
(2018) Bioessays 40: e1800133
MeSH Terms: Archaea, Bacteria, Crystallography, X-Ray, DNA, DNA Damage, DNA Glycosylases, DNA Repair, Eukaryota, Protein Conformation
Show Abstract · Added August 26, 2019
DNA glycosylases remove aberrant DNA nucleobases as the first enzymatic step of the base excision repair (BER) pathway. The alkyl-DNA glycosylases AlkC and AlkD adopt a unique structure based on α-helical HEAT repeats. Both enzymes identify and excise their substrates without a base-flipping mechanism used by other glycosylases and nucleic acid processing proteins to access nucleobases that are otherwise stacked inside the double-helix. Consequently, these glycosylases act on a variety of cationic nucleobase modifications, including bulky adducts, not previously associated with BER. The related non-enzymatic HEAT-like repeat (HLR) proteins, AlkD2, and AlkF, have unique nucleic acid binding properties that expand the functions of this relatively new protein superfamily beyond DNA repair. Here, we review the phylogeny, biochemistry, and structures of the HLR proteins, which have helped broaden our understanding of the mechanisms by which DNA glycosylases locate and excise chemically modified DNA nucleobases.
© 2018 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.
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Structural and Functional Features of the Reovirus σ1 Tail.
Dietrich MH, Ogden KM, Long JM, Ebenhoch R, Thor A, Dermody TS, Stehle T
(2018) J Virol 92:
MeSH Terms: Amino Acid Sequence, Capsid Proteins, Cells, Cultured, Crystallography, X-Ray, Protein Binding, Protein Conformation, Receptors, Virus, Reoviridae, Reoviridae Infections, Sequence Homology, Virus Attachment, Virus Internalization, Virus Replication
Show Abstract · Added April 3, 2019
Mammalian orthoreovirus attachment to target cells is mediated by the outer capsid protein σ1, which projects from the virion surface. The σ1 protein is a homotrimer consisting of a filamentous tail, which is partly inserted into the virion; a body domain constructed from β-spiral repeats; and a globular head with receptor-binding properties. The σ1 tail is predicted to form an α-helical coiled coil. Although σ1 undergoes a conformational change during cell entry, the nature of this change and its contributions to viral replication are unknown. Electron micrographs of σ1 molecules released from virions identified three regions of flexibility, including one at the midpoint of the molecule, that may be involved in its structural rearrangement. To enable a detailed understanding of essential σ1 tail organization and properties, we determined high-resolution structures of the reovirus type 1 Lang (T1L) and type 3 Dearing (T3D) σ1 tail domains. Both molecules feature extended α-helical coiled coils, with T1L σ1 harboring central chloride ions. Each molecule displays a discontinuity (stutter) within the coiled coil and an unexpectedly seamless transition to the body domain. The transition region features conserved interdomain interactions and appears rigid rather than highly flexible. Functional analyses of reoviruses containing engineered σ1 mutations suggest that conserved residues predicted to stabilize the coiled-coil-to-body junction are essential for σ1 folding and encapsidation, whereas central chloride ion coordination and the stutter are dispensable for efficient replication. Together, these findings enable modeling of full-length reovirus σ1 and provide insight into the stabilization of a multidomain virus attachment protein. While it is established that different conformational states of attachment proteins of enveloped viruses mediate receptor binding and membrane fusion, less is understood about how such proteins mediate attachment and entry of nonenveloped viruses. The filamentous reovirus attachment protein σ1 binds cellular receptors; contains regions of predicted flexibility, including one at the fiber midpoint; and undergoes a conformational change during cell entry. Neither the nature of the structural change nor its contribution to viral infection is understood. We determined crystal structures of large σ1 fragments for two different reovirus serotypes. We observed an unexpectedly tight transition between two domains spanning the fiber midpoint, which allows for little flexibility. Studies of reoviruses with engineered changes near the σ1 midpoint suggest that the stabilization of this region is critical for function. Together with a previously determined structure, we now have a complete model of the full-length, elongated reovirus σ1 attachment protein.
Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.
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The unassembled flavoprotein subunits of human and bacterial complex II have impaired catalytic activity and generate only minor amounts of ROS.
Maklashina E, Rajagukguk S, Iverson TM, Cecchini G
(2018) J Biol Chem 293: 7754-7765
MeSH Terms: Bacterial Proteins, Catalysis, Crystallography, X-Ray, Electron Transport Complex II, Escherichia coli, Flavoproteins, Humans, Models, Molecular, Oxidation-Reduction, Protein Conformation, Protein Subunits, Reactive Oxygen Species
Show Abstract · Added April 1, 2019
Complex II (SdhABCD) is a membrane-bound component of mitochondrial and bacterial electron transport chains, as well as of the TCA cycle. In this capacity, it catalyzes the reversible oxidation of succinate. SdhABCD contains the SDHA protein harboring a covalently bound FAD redox center and the iron-sulfur protein SDHB, containing three distinct iron-sulfur centers. When assembly of this complex is compromised, the flavoprotein SDHA may accumulate in the mitochondrial matrix or bacterial cytoplasm. Whether the unassembled SDHA has any catalytic activity, for example in succinate oxidation, fumarate reduction, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, or other off-pathway reactions, is not known. Therefore, here we investigated whether unassembled SdhA flavoprotein, its homolog fumarate reductase (FrdA), and the human SDHA protein have succinate oxidase or fumarate reductase activity and can produce ROS. Using recombinant expression in , we found that the free flavoproteins from these divergent biological sources have inherently low catalytic activity and generate little ROS. These results suggest that the iron-sulfur protein SDHB in complex II is necessary for robust catalytic activity. Our findings are consistent with those reported for single-subunit flavoprotein homologs that are not associated with iron-sulfur or heme partner proteins.
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A Mechanism of Calmodulin Modulation of the Human Cardiac Sodium Channel.
Johnson CN, Potet F, Thompson MK, Kroncke BM, Glazer AM, Voehler MW, Knollmann BC, George AL, Chazin WJ
(2018) Structure 26: 683-694.e3
MeSH Terms: Binding Sites, Calcium, Calmodulin, Crystallography, X-Ray, Gene Expression Regulation, Humans, Kinetics, Models, Molecular, Mutation, NAV1.5 Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel, Protein Binding
Show Abstract · Added March 26, 2019
The function of the human cardiac sodium channel (Na1.5) is modulated by the Ca sensor calmodulin (CaM), but the underlying mechanism(s) are controversial and poorly defined. CaM has been reported to bind in a Ca-dependent manner to two sites in the intracellular loop that is critical for inactivation of Na1.5 (inactivation gate [IG]). The affinity of CaM for the complete IG was significantly stronger than that of fragments that lacked both complete binding sites. Structural analysis by nuclear magnetic resonance, crystallographic, and scattering approaches revealed that CaM simultaneously engages both IG sites using an extended configuration. Patch-clamp recordings for wild-type and mutant channels with an impaired CaM-IG interaction revealed CaM binding to the IG promotes recovery from inactivation while impeding the kinetics of inactivation. Models of full-length Na1.5 suggest that CaM binding to the IG directly modulates channel function by destabilizing the inactivated state, which would promote resetting of the IG after channels close.
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
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Crystal structure of an assembly intermediate of respiratory Complex II.
Sharma P, Maklashina E, Cecchini G, Iverson TM
(2018) Nat Commun 9: 274
MeSH Terms: Crystallography, X-Ray, Electron Transport Complex II, Escherichia coli, Escherichia coli Proteins, Flavin-Adenine Dinucleotide, Oxidoreductases
Show Abstract · Added April 1, 2019
Flavin is covalently attached to the protein scaffold in ~10% of flavoenzymes. However, the mechanism of covalent modification is unclear, due in part to challenges in stabilizing assembly intermediates. Here, we capture the structure of an assembly intermediate of the Escherichia coli Complex II (quinol:fumarate reductase (FrdABCD)). The structure contains the E. coli FrdA subunit bound to covalent FAD and crosslinked with its assembly factor, SdhE. The structure contains two global conformational changes as compared to prior structures of the mature protein: the rotation of a domain within the FrdA subunit, and the destabilization of two large loops of the FrdA subunit, which may create a tunnel to the active site. We infer a mechanism for covalent flavinylation. As supported by spectroscopic and kinetic analyses, we suggest that SdhE shifts the conformational equilibrium of the FrdA active site to disfavor succinate/fumarate interconversion and enhance covalent flavinylation.
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The Marburgvirus-Neutralizing Human Monoclonal Antibody MR191 Targets a Conserved Site to Block Virus Receptor Binding.
King LB, Fusco ML, Flyak AI, Ilinykh PA, Huang K, Gunn B, Kirchdoerfer RN, Hastie KM, Sangha AK, Meiler J, Alter G, Bukreyev A, Crowe JE, Saphire EO
(2018) Cell Host Microbe 23: 101-109.e4
MeSH Terms: Agrobacterium tumefaciens, Animals, Antibodies, Monoclonal, Antibodies, Neutralizing, Antibodies, Viral, Binding Sites, Carrier Proteins, Cell Line, Cercopithecus aethiops, Crystallography, X-Ray, Drosophila melanogaster, Humans, Marburgvirus, Membrane Glycoproteins, Receptors, Virus, Tobacco, Vero Cells, Viral Envelope Proteins, Viral Fusion Proteins, Virus Attachment
Show Abstract · Added March 17, 2018
Since their first identification 50 years ago, marburgviruses have emerged several times, with 83%-90% lethality in the largest outbreaks. Although no vaccines or therapeutics are available for human use, the human antibody MR191 provides complete protection in non-human primates when delivered several days after inoculation of a lethal marburgvirus dose. The detailed neutralization mechanism of MR191 remains outstanding. Here we present a 3.2 Å crystal structure of MR191 complexed with a trimeric marburgvirus surface glycoprotein (GP). MR191 neutralizes by occupying the conserved receptor-binding site and competing with the host receptor Niemann-Pick C1. The structure illuminates previously disordered regions of GP including the stalk, fusion loop, CXCC switch, and an N-terminal region of GP2 that wraps about the outside of GP1 to anchor a marburgvirus-specific "wing" antibody epitope. Virus escape mutations mapped far outside the MR191 receptor-binding site footprint suggest a role for these other regions in the GP quaternary structure.
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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20 MeSH Terms