Other search tools

About this data

The publication data currently available has been vetted by Vanderbilt faculty, staff, administrators and trainees. The data itself is retrieved directly from NCBI's PubMed and is automatically updated on a weekly basis to ensure accuracy and completeness.

If you have any questions or comments, please contact us.

Results: 1 to 10 of 434

Publication Record

Connections

A Type 1 Diabetes Genetic Risk Score Predicts Progression of Islet Autoimmunity and Development of Type 1 Diabetes in Individuals at Risk.
Redondo MJ, Geyer S, Steck AK, Sharp S, Wentworth JM, Weedon MN, Antinozzi P, Sosenko J, Atkinson M, Pugliese A, Oram RA, Type 1 Diabetes TrialNet Study Group
(2018) Diabetes Care 41: 1887-1894
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Autoantibodies, Autoimmunity, Child, Child, Preschool, Diabetes Complications, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1, Disease Progression, Female, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Genotype, HLA-DQ Antigens, Humans, Infant, Islets of Langerhans, Male, Middle Aged, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Prognosis, Risk Factors, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added July 23, 2018
OBJECTIVE - We tested the ability of a type 1 diabetes (T1D) genetic risk score (GRS) to predict progression of islet autoimmunity and T1D in at-risk individuals.
RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - We studied the 1,244 TrialNet Pathway to Prevention study participants (T1D patients' relatives without diabetes and with one or more positive autoantibodies) who were genotyped with Illumina ImmunoChip (median [range] age at initial autoantibody determination 11.1 years [1.2-51.8], 48% male, 80.5% non-Hispanic white, median follow-up 5.4 years). Of 291 participants with a single positive autoantibody at screening, 157 converted to multiple autoantibody positivity and 55 developed diabetes. Of 953 participants with multiple positive autoantibodies at screening, 419 developed diabetes. We calculated the T1D GRS from 30 T1D-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms. We used multivariable Cox regression models, time-dependent receiver operating characteristic curves, and area under the curve (AUC) measures to evaluate prognostic utility of T1D GRS, age, sex, Diabetes Prevention Trial-Type 1 (DPT-1) Risk Score, positive autoantibody number or type, HLA DR3/DR4-DQ8 status, and race/ethnicity. We used recursive partitioning analyses to identify cut points in continuous variables.
RESULTS - Higher T1D GRS significantly increased the rate of progression to T1D adjusting for DPT-1 Risk Score, age, number of positive autoantibodies, sex, and ethnicity (hazard ratio [HR] 1.29 for a 0.05 increase, 95% CI 1.06-1.6; = 0.011). Progression to T1D was best predicted by a combined model with GRS, number of positive autoantibodies, DPT-1 Risk Score, and age (7-year time-integrated AUC = 0.79, 5-year AUC = 0.73). Higher GRS was significantly associated with increased progression rate from single to multiple positive autoantibodies after adjusting for age, autoantibody type, ethnicity, and sex (HR 2.27 for GRS >0.295, 95% CI 1.47-3.51; = 0.0002).
CONCLUSIONS - The T1D GRS independently predicts progression to T1D and improves prediction along T1D stages in autoantibody-positive relatives.
© 2018 by the American Diabetes Association.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
22 MeSH Terms
Validation of an algorithm to identify heart failure hospitalisations in patients with diabetes within the veterans health administration.
Presley CA, Min JY, Chipman J, Greevy RA, Grijalva CG, Griffin MR, Roumie CL
(2018) BMJ Open 8: e020455
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Algorithms, Diabetes Complications, Diabetes Mellitus, Diagnosis-Related Groups, Female, Heart Failure, Hospitalization, Humans, International Classification of Diseases, Male, Middle Aged, Predictive Value of Tests, Sensitivity and Specificity, Veterans
Show Abstract · Added July 27, 2018
OBJECTIVES - We aimed to validate an algorithm using both primary discharge diagnosis (International Classification of Diseases Ninth Revision (ICD-9)) and diagnosis-related group (DRG) codes to identify hospitalisations due to decompensated heart failure (HF) in a population of patients with diabetes within the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) system.
DESIGN - Validation study.
SETTING - Veterans Health Administration-Tennessee Valley Healthcare System PARTICIPANTS: We identified and reviewed a stratified, random sample of hospitalisations between 2001 and 2012 within a single VHA healthcare system of adults who received regular VHA care and were initiated on an antidiabetic medication between 2001 and 2008. We sampled 500 hospitalisations; 400 hospitalisations that fulfilled algorithm criteria, 100 that did not. Of these, 497 had adequate information for inclusion. The mean patient age was 66.1 years (SD 11.4). Majority of patients were male (98.8%); 75% were white and 20% were black.
PRIMARY AND SECONDARY OUTCOME MEASURES - To determine if a hospitalisation was due to HF, we performed chart abstraction using Framingham criteria as the referent standard. We calculated the positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), sensitivity and specificity for the overall algorithm and each component (primary diagnosis code (ICD-9), DRG code or both).
RESULTS - The algorithm had a PPV of 89.7% (95% CI 86.8 to 92.7), NPV of 93.9% (89.1 to 98.6), sensitivity of 45.1% (25.1 to 65.1) and specificity of 99.4% (99.2 to 99.6). The PPV was highest for hospitalisations that fulfilled both the ICD-9 and DRG algorithm criteria (92.1% (89.1 to 95.1)) and lowest for hospitalisations that fulfilled only DRG algorithm criteria (62.5% (28.4 to 96.6)).
CONCLUSIONS - Our algorithm, which included primary discharge diagnosis and DRG codes, demonstrated excellent PPV for identification of hospitalisations due to decompensated HF among patients with diabetes in the VHA system.
© Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
16 MeSH Terms
Venous Thromboembolism during Interventional MRI-Guided Stereotactic Surgery.
Kundishora AJ, Englot DJ, Starr PA, Martin AJ, Larson PS
(2018) Stereotact Funct Neurosurg 96: 40-45
MeSH Terms: Adolescent, Adult, Aged, Child, Female, Humans, Imaging, Three-Dimensional, Intraoperative Complications, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Interventional, Male, Middle Aged, Retrospective Studies, Risk Factors, Stereotaxic Techniques, Venous Thromboembolism, Young Adult
Show Abstract · Added September 25, 2018
BACKGROUND/AIMS - Interventional MRI (iMRI) allows real-time confirmation of electrode and microcatheter location in anesthetized patients; however, MRI-compatible pneumatic compression devices (PCD) to reduce the periprocedural venous thromboembolism (VTE) risk are not commercially available. Given the paucity of literature on VTE following iMRI surgery, better characterizing patients suffering this complication and the incidence of this event following iMRI procedures is pivotal for defining best surgical practices. We aim to investigate the incidence of postoperative VTE in iMRI procedures without the use of PCD.
METHODS - Medical records and operative times of patients were retrospectively reviewed. Patient demographics and mean surgical durations were reported with statistical comparisons via ANOVA and the 2-tailed Student t test, an α of 0.05, and the Bonferroni correction. Patients experiencing postoperative VTE underwent an in-depth chart review.
RESULTS - Two out of two hundred ten (0.95%) iMRI procedures resulted in postoperative VTE events. There were statistically significant differences in procedure times between unilateral electrode (157.5 ± 5.7 min), bilateral electrode (193.6 ± 2.9 min), and bilateral gene therapy procedures (467.3 ± 26.5 min). Both patients had longer-than-average operative times for their respective procedures.
CONCLUSIONS - The incidence of postoperative VTE is low following iMRI procedures, even without the use of PCD during surgery.
© 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
16 MeSH Terms
Lipopolysaccharide-induced maternal inflammation induces direct placental injury without alteration in placental blood flow and induces a secondary fetal intestinal injury that persists into adulthood.
Fricke EM, Elgin TG, Gong H, Reese J, Gibson-Corley KN, Weiss RM, Zimmerman K, Bowdler NC, Kalantera KM, Mills DA, Underwood MA, McElroy SJ
(2018) Am J Reprod Immunol 79: e12816
MeSH Terms: Amniotic Fluid, Animals, Digestive System Diseases, Disease Models, Animal, Female, Fetal Diseases, Inflammation, Interleukins, Lipopolysaccharides, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Necrosis, Placenta, Placental Insufficiency, Pregnancy, Pregnancy Complications, Regional Blood Flow
Show Abstract · Added March 31, 2018
PROBLEM - Premature birth complicates 10%-12% of deliveries. Infection and inflammation are the most common etiologies and are associated with increased offspring morbidity and mortality. We hypothesize that lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced maternal inflammation causes direct placenta injury and subsequent injury to the fetal intestine.
METHOD OF STUDY - Pregnant C57Bl6 mice were injected intraperitoneally on day 15.5 with 100 μg/kg LPS or saline. Maternal serum, amniotic fluid, placental samples, and ileal samples of offspring were obtained assessed for inflammation and/or injury. Maternal placental ultrasounds were performed. Placental DNA was isolated for microbiome analysis.
RESULTS - Maternal injection with LPS caused elevated IL-1β, IL-10, IL-6, KC-GRO, and TNF. Placental tissue showed increased IL-1β, IL-6, and KC-GRO and decreased IL-10, but no changes were observed in amniotic fluid. Placental histology demonstrated LPS-induced increases in mineralization and necrosis, but no difference in placental blood flow. Most placentas had no detectable microbiome. Exposure to maternal LPS induced significant injury to the ilea of the offspring.
CONCLUSION - Lipopolysaccharide causes a maternal inflammatory response that is mirrored in the placenta. Placental histology demonstrates structural changes; however, placental blood flow is preserved. LPS also induces an indirect intestinal injury in the offspring that lasts beyond the neonatal period.
© 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
17 MeSH Terms
The Morbidity of Ureteral Strictures in Patients with Prior Ureteroscopic Stone Surgery: Multi-Institutional Outcomes.
May PC, Hsi RS, Tran H, Stoller ML, Chew BH, Chi T, Usawachintachit M, Duty BD, Gore JL, Harper JD
(2018) J Endourol 32: 309-314
MeSH Terms: Adult, Aged, Anesthesia, General, Constriction, Pathologic, Female, Humans, Hydronephrosis, Kidney Calculi, Lithotripsy, Male, Middle Aged, Morbidity, Nephrectomy, Nephrotomy, Outcome Assessment (Health Care), Postoperative Complications, Retrospective Studies, Risk Factors, Stents, Tertiary Care Centers, Ureter, Ureteral Obstruction, Ureteroscopy
Show Abstract · Added January 16, 2018
PURPOSE - Nephrolithiasis is an increasingly common ailment in the United States. Ureteroscopic management has supplanted shockwave lithotripsy as the most common treatment of upper tract stone disease. Ureteral stricture is a rare but serious complication of stone disease and its management. The impact of new technologies and more widespread ureteroscopic management on stricture rates is unknown. We describe our experience in managing strictures incurred following ureteroscopy for upper tract stone disease.
MATERIALS AND METHODS - Records for patients managed at four tertiary care centers between December 2006 and October 2015 with the diagnosis of ureteral stricture following ureteroscopy for upper tract stone disease were retrospectively reviewed. Study outcomes included number and type (endoscopic, reconstructive, or nephrectomy) of procedures required to manage stricture.
RESULTS - Thirty-eight patients with 40 ureteral strictures following URS for upper tract stone disease were identified. Thirty-five percent of patients had hydronephrosis or known stone impaction at the time of initial URS, and 20% of cases had known ureteral perforation at the time of initial URS. After stricture diagnosis, the mean number of procedures requiring sedation or general anesthesia performed for stricture management was 3.3 ± 1.8 (range 1-10). Eleven strictures (27.5%) were successfully managed with endoscopic techniques alone, 37.5% underwent reconstruction, 10% had a chronic stent/nephrostomy, and 10 (25%) required nephrectomy.
CONCLUSIONS - The surgical morbidity of ureteral strictures incurred following ureteroscopy for stone disease can be severe, with a low success rate of endoscopic management and a high procedural burden that may lead to nephrectomy. Further studies that assess specific technical risk factors for ureteral stricture following URS are needed.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
23 MeSH Terms
Neurodevelopmental considerations in surgical necrotizing enterocolitis.
Robinson JR, Kennedy C, van Arendonk KJ, Green A, Martin CR, Blakely ML
(2018) Semin Pediatr Surg 27: 52-56
MeSH Terms: Enterocolitis, Necrotizing, Humans, Infant, Newborn, Infant, Premature, Infant, Premature, Diseases, Neurodevelopmental Disorders, Neuropsychological Tests, Postoperative Complications
Show Abstract · Added June 27, 2018
The majority of surviving infants with surgical necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) will have some degree of neurodevelopmental impairment. The impact of specific medial and surgical treatments for infants with severe NEC remains largely unknown but is being actively investigated. It is incumbent upon all providers caring for these infants to continue to focus on long term neurodevelopmental outcomes and to develop more widespread methods of neurodevelopmental assessment.
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
MeSH Terms
High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Concentration and Acute Kidney Injury After Cardiac Surgery.
Smith LE, Smith DK, Blume JD, Linton MF, Billings FT
(2017) J Am Heart Assoc 6:
MeSH Terms: Acute Kidney Injury, Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Atorvastatin, Cardiac Surgical Procedures, Cholesterol, HDL, Coronary Artery Disease, Dose-Response Relationship, Drug, Double-Blind Method, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Humans, Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors, Kidney Function Tests, Male, Middle Aged, Postoperative Complications, Postoperative Period, Preoperative Period, Risk Factors, Treatment Outcome
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2018
BACKGROUND - Acute kidney injury (AKI) after cardiac surgery is associated with increased short- and long-term mortality. Inflammation, oxidative stress, and endothelial dysfunction and damage play important roles in the development of AKI. High-density lipoproteins (HDLs) have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties and improve endothelial function and repair. Statins enhance HDL's anti-inflammatory and antioxidant capacities. We hypothesized that a higher preoperative HDL cholesterol concentration is associated with decreased AKI after cardiac surgery and that perioperative statin exposure potentiates this association.
METHODS AND RESULTS - We tested our hypothesis in 391 subjects from a randomized clinical trial of perioperative atorvastatin to reduce AKI after cardiac surgery. A 2-component latent variable mixture model was used to assess the association between preoperative HDL cholesterol concentration and postoperative change in serum creatinine, adjusted for known AKI risk factors and suspected confounders. Interaction terms were used to examine the effects of preoperative statin use, preoperative statin dose, and perioperative atorvastatin treatment on the association between preoperative HDL and AKI. A higher preoperative HDL cholesterol concentration was independently associated with a decreased postoperative serum creatinine change (=0.02). The association between a high HDL concentration and an attenuated increase in serum creatinine was strongest in long-term statin-using patients (=0.008) and was further enhanced with perioperative atorvastatin treatment (=0.004) and increasing long-term statin dose (=0.003).
CONCLUSIONS - A higher preoperative HDL cholesterol concentration was associated with decreased AKI after cardiac surgery. Preoperative and perioperative statin treatment enhanced this association, demonstrating that pharmacological potentiation is possible during the perioperative period.
CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION - URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique Identifier: NCT00791648.
© 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
21 MeSH Terms
Outcomes after vascular resection during curative-intent resection for hilar cholangiocarcinoma: a multi-institution study from the US extrahepatic biliary malignancy consortium.
Schimizzi GV, Jin LX, Davidson JT, Krasnick BA, Ethun CG, Pawlik TM, Poultsides G, Tran T, Idrees K, Isom CA, Weber SM, Salem A, Hawkins WG, Strasberg SM, Doyle MB, Chapman WC, Martin RCG, Scoggins C, Shen P, Mogal HD, Schmidt C, Beal E, Hatzaras I, Shenoy R, Maithel SK, Fields RC
(2018) HPB (Oxford) 20: 332-339
MeSH Terms: Aged, Bile Duct Neoplasms, Cholecystectomy, Databases, Factual, Female, Hepatectomy, Hepatic Artery, Humans, Klatskin Tumor, Male, Middle Aged, Neoplasm Grading, Neoplasm Staging, Pancreaticoduodenectomy, Portal Vein, Postoperative Complications, Retrospective Studies, Risk Factors, Time Factors, Treatment Outcome, United States, Vascular Surgical Procedures
Show Abstract · Added April 10, 2018
BACKGROUND - Surgical resection is the cornerstone of curative-intent therapy for patients with hilar cholangiocarcinoma (HC). The role of vascular resection (VR) in the treatment of HC in western centres is not well defined.
METHODS - Utilizing data from the U.S. Extrahepatic Biliary Malignancy Consortium, patients were grouped into those who underwent resection for HC based on VR status: no VR, portal vein resection (PVR), or hepatic artery resection (HAR). Perioperative and long-term survival outcomes were analyzed.
RESULTS - Between 1998 and 2015, 201 patients underwent resection for HC, of which 31 (15%) underwent VR: 19 patients (9%) underwent PVR alone and 12 patients (6%) underwent HAR either with (n = 2) or without PVR (n = 10). Patients selected for VR tended to be younger with higher stage disease. Rates of postoperative complications and 30-day mortality were similar when stratified by vascular resection status. On multivariate analysis, receipt of PVR or HAR did not significantly affect OS or RFS.
CONCLUSION - In a modern, multi-institutional cohort of patients undergoing curative-intent resection for HC, VR appears to be a safe procedure in a highly selected subset, although long-term survival outcomes appear equivalent. VR should be considered only in select patients based on tumor and patient characteristics.
Copyright © 2017 International Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Association Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
22 MeSH Terms
Interpregnancy Interval After Pregnancy Loss and Risk of Repeat Miscarriage.
Sundermann AC, Hartmann KE, Jones SH, Torstenson ES, Velez Edwards DR
(2017) Obstet Gynecol 130: 1312-1318
MeSH Terms: Abortion, Spontaneous, Adult, Birth Intervals, Cohort Studies, Female, Humans, Maternal Age, Parity, Pregnancy, Pregnancy Complications, Pregnancy Outcome, Proportional Hazards Models, Prospective Studies, Risk Assessment, Risk Factors, Tennessee
Show Abstract · Added February 21, 2019
OBJECTIVE - To assess whether interpregnancy interval length after a pregnancy loss is associated with risk of repeat miscarriage.
METHODS - This analysis includes pregnant women participating in the Right From the Start (2000-2012) community-based prospective cohort study whose most recent pregnancy before enrollment ended in miscarriage. Interpregnancy interval was defined as the time between a prior miscarriage and the last menstrual period of the study pregnancy. Miscarriage was defined as pregnancy loss before 20 weeks of gestation. Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate crude and adjusted hazard ratios and 95% CIs for the association between different interpregnancy interval lengths and miscarriage in the study pregnancy. Adjusted models included maternal age, race, parity, body mass index, and education.
RESULTS - Among the 514 study participants who reported miscarriage as their most recent pregnancy outcome, 15.7% had a repeat miscarriage in the study pregnancy (n=81). Median maternal age was 30 years (interquartile range 27-34) and 55.6% of participants had at least one previous livebirth (n=286). When compared with women with interpregnancy intervals of 6-18 months (n=136), women with intervals of less than 3 months (n=124) had the lowest risk of repeat miscarriage (7.3% compared with 22.1%; adjusted hazard ratio 0.33, 95% CI 0.16-0.71). Neither maternal race nor parity modified the association. Attempting to conceive immediately was not associated with increased risk of miscarriage in the next pregnancy.
CONCLUSION - An interpregnancy interval after pregnancy loss of less than 3 months is associated with the lowest risk of subsequent miscarriage. This implies counseling women to delay conception to reduce risk of miscarriage may not be warranted.
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
MeSH Terms
Erythematous plaques and papules on a premature infant.
Riemenschneider K, Redenius R, Reese J, Fine JD, Weitkamp JH, Tkaczyk E
(2017) J Am Acad Dermatol 76: e111-e112
MeSH Terms: Anti-Bacterial Agents, Apgar Score, Biopsy, Needle, Female, Follow-Up Studies, Gestational Age, Humans, Immunohistochemistry, Impetigo, Infant, Newborn, Infant, Premature, Male, Pregnancy, Pregnancy Complications, Infectious, Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Newborn, Streptococcal Infections, Treatment Outcome
Show Abstract · Added March 31, 2018
A 2240 gram boy was born at 33.2 weeks gestation with nonblanching, deeply erythematous plaques and papules on the back, flanks, and scalp (Figure 1). His mother was GBS positive and on antibiotic suppression for prior cutaneous MRSA and urinary tract infections. Intrapartum intravenous Penicillin G was administered, and the amniotic sac was artificially ruptured 4 hours prior to delivery to facilitate labor. The delivery was uncomplicated without concern for chorioamnionitis, but the patient initially required CPAP for respiratory distress with 1-minute and 5-minute Apgar scores of 7 and 8, respectively. A skin punch biopsy is shown (Figure 2).
0 Communities
1 Members
0 Resources
MeSH Terms